talesofthestarshipregeneration
touchmeordont:

kohenari:


Last month, when Glenn Ford was released from prison for a crime he didn’t commit, the state of Louisiana “gave him a $20 debit card for his troubles.” That, plus the four cents he had left in his prison account, was all he had.
How do you build up the material accumulations of a lifetime overnight? How do you do it with no money? Where do you even begin?
Ford’s friend John Thompson had a clever idea: Do what millions of Americans do when they are hoping that other people will buy them a whole bunch of stuff. Build an Amazon registry.

The Amazon Wish List is here.
Read the whole piece here.

Just bought this dude something off his wishlist. You should too.

touchmeordont:

kohenari:

Last month, when Glenn Ford was released from prison for a crime he didn’t commit, the state of Louisiana “gave him a $20 debit card for his troubles.” That, plus the four cents he had left in his prison account, was all he had.

How do you build up the material accumulations of a lifetime overnight? How do you do it with no money? Where do you even begin?

Ford’s friend John Thompson had a clever idea: Do what millions of Americans do when they are hoping that other people will buy them a whole bunch of stuff. Build an Amazon registry.

The Amazon Wish List is here.

Read the whole piece here.

Just bought this dude something off his wishlist. You should too.

medievalpoc

Janet Stephens, Independent Scholarship, and Roman Hairstyles

medievalpoc:

obfuscobble:

medievalpoc:

overlordrae replied to your post: eruditefag asked:I’m just wonderi…

Asking about how qualified someone is in academia always brings to mind how a hairdresser discovered how Roman hairstyles were done when many thought the portrait styles were just idealized fancy.

Janet Stephens, tearing down ur Ivory Tower:

Stephens, a hairdresser based in Baltimore, took a trip to the Walters Art Museum back in 2001 and learned about the intricate hairdos worn by Vestal Virgins so she could duplicate them herself. But she ended up delving further into the fashion and art history books than she’d anticipated. Four years later, Stephens made a phenomenal discovery that she says “essentially changed the field of classical hair studies.”

While reading Roman literature, she stumbled across the term “acus” which has been translated to “hairpin.” But Stephens’ experience with embroidery sparked the theory that these ancient hairdos were actually created using a needle and thread — which was pretty convincing. Her findings were published in the 2008 edition of the Journal of Roman Archaeology.

"That quote everyone was referencing for centuries, but no one took it literally until I came along," she said. “Maybe that was the naivety in me.”

When she’s not cutting, coloring and highlighting at Studio 921 Salon and Day Spa in Baltimore, Stephens is practicing what she preaches by recreating ancient Roman hairstyles at home. Her YouTube channel includes tutorials featuring background on the women who wore these intricate hairdos, insight on their hair textures, the types of styling tools used and how they’d maintain these looks.

But of course HOW DARE SHE QUESTION THE “ACCEPTED FACTS”, RIGHT?

:D

Y’all help I can’t stop watching these ancient roman hairstyling vids.

1. dang they had crazy hair ok?
2. SEW THAT HAIR
3. Who thought up these hairstyles like seriously it was some sort of party where they tried to build houses with hair or something
4. Someone thought this hairstyle up.  Now Janet Stephens recreates it.  At the end of the vid she even shows how to do those weird curl crowns that look like headbands but nope it’s hair.

SERiously!!!! I think people are underestimating just HOW COOL THIS IS:

image

image

image

THERE ARE SIMPLE ONES, TOO!

Classical Greek Hairstyle:

image

image

image

^ I would even do that!

nudiemuse

puccinisghost asked:

The Hellenistic stele you posted is beautiful, but whether it's meant to represent a POC is debatable; it seems to have been a fairly common practice in Greek art (as in Egyptian) to represent men with darker skin than women, reflecting the "men spend time outdoors, women are sequestered indoors" ideology of gender roles.

medievalpoc answered:

[post for reference]

Like, okay I’m not angry, because i know and understand that this is what you learned in class, and this is why other people send angry asks about my qualifications like this one about how Wrongety Wrongsauce I am about everything ever.

I have written so much about “color conventions” and gender and how utterly outdated all of this is, along with the fact that I cannot find anything to really support this assumption other than “a Victorian guy made this up in the 1800s”. and everyone after that just decided to agree.

Here’s an article I wrote about the Aegean Skin Color/Gender Convention.

Here’s an image from a post slated to go out a bit later today of another, very similar funerary stele of a woman giving birth (because she died in childbirth) with (GASP!) brown skin (along with another of her female attendants):

Also, the thing about Egyptian Art and skin color/gender conventions?

I find it fascinating that the only time this comes up is when there’s some kind of investment white/western culture has in claiming an ancient culture as its own. Go ahead, read a whole article on it. Bend over backwards to try and find a “reason” why diverse skin colors would have been depicted in ancient art. Here’s another post with some replies and analysis (although it’s gotten a bit garbled in the html attributions, sorry about that), but this debate about skin color as an abstract artistic symbol versus skin color as skin color probably jumped the shark at least 20 years ago.

nudiemuse:

medievalpoc:

hiphopocliedes:

thestolencaryatid:

medievalpoc:

eruditefag:

You talk about the color/gender conventions in ancient Greek art as if they aren’t a real thing, but they are. There’s recent scholarship (terrible, I know—gatekeeping elitism, etc.) on the subject. 

Moreover, the stelae that you’ve posted are Hellenistic, so attempting to make the connection to the Aegean Bronze Age, which ended at ~700 prior depending on whom you ask is difficult at best. 

Since you haven’t asked any questions this time, I’ll provide some! It’ll be just like Jeopardy!

If you think I’m not qualified, why are you coming down off your high horse to argue with me?

Why are you so invested in analyzing periods in a vacuum, as if they have nothing to do with cultures that existed before, or were influential toward things that came after?

Why aren’t you interesting in analyzing how and why the skin color=gender convention is used in application to (according to you) such dissimilar periods? What purpose could that serve?

Why are you overstating my position about color conventions and symbolism in art (as if I’m stating that they don’t exist)? Could it be because you’re overly invested in things you learned in class that your professors presented as unchallenged, and yet is actually an academic debate with yes, lots of recent scholarship?

Why is it so un-possible to compare the same practice from modern historians being applied to different eras or geographical location and try to find a pattern? To do a cross-analysis on how this bust of Memnon was received by modern historians? To do yet another analysis on why so many scholars try to find an “explanation” for the Black Madonnas of Europe? Maybe wonder what this could mean about academic attitudes toward skin color in general, and the investment in symbolism versus literally any other interpretation?

To maybe think about why they would do that? Or to re-asses the credence we give to modern interpretations of ancient evidence, or at least acknowledge that we’re reading INTERPRETATIONS and not some kind of perfectly preserved Absolute Truth from that time?

Or, you know, we could just talk about how I’m really just some Totally Unqualified Subhuman who No One Has To Listen To instead.

I think it’s really important for people to see and really look at how these kind of debates take place, and think about why they happen. About who is seen as “legitimate” and who is not.

What is “Expertise”, really? How do we decide? Who should we listen to, and why? Who is allowed to criticize institutionally accepted interpretations? And is anyone ever Qualified Enough?

this obsession with determining the racial identity of a culture with no concept or social organization of race is truly disturbing, especially as it rests on using modern terminologies to analyze ART and depictions in fucking ART and the way you think about ART TODAY is not how people in Bronze age Crete thought of “art” nor were they trying to fulfill a quota in representing diversity

americans are truly fucking disturbed 

Here we see medievalpoc accusing someone else of analysing a situation with an anachronistic viewpoint

^ I think anyone reading the above criticism should take the opportunity to sort of compare it with the discussion that just took place about Sleeping Black Man, how how our modern views of race 100% inform how we see race in Art History, even Ancient Art.

It’s just really weird to me that so many people seem to have a problem with my analysis of a situation that already exists, rather than that situation existing in the first place.

Like, ??????

It wasn’t MY idea to assign everyone who ever lived a race. I’m trying to document how those races were assigned and why.

I never claimed to understand what people in Ancient Crete thought about anything. That’s not what we do here. We talk about how we view art today, as modern people, and how our views are filtered by our modern ideas and attitudes.

Is this really that hard to understand?

Also, “fulfill a quota in representing diversity”? I think there is something wrong here and I do not think that it is this blog existing. :|

I don’t even know what’s happening anymore.

I hate that I am ever surprised that people want to keep history as white as they can.

The lengths people will go to.

To make sure nothing of beauty, grace or import in history happened involving people of color. More so if they are Black.

garpusstuff

garpusstuff:

sahnin:

samjohnssonvt:

gaywrites:

Remember when Honey Maid released that “wholesome families” ad, featuring same-sex couples, parents with tattoos, biracial couples, and other general awesomeness? Conservatives were pissed. So Honey Maid did them one better and released another video, addressing the hateful and homophobic comments head-on. And now I’m crying. (via the Huffington Post)

some times, a company feels the need to flip off its critics. and some times, it is GLORIOUS

Welp, looks like I’m adding Honey  Maid products up near Ben and Jerry’s ice cream for my weekly shopping list.

Only brand of graham cracker without HFCS, too.

falsecatalyst

cognitivedissonance:

dennisnsantana:

averyterrible:

taylorswifthecreator:

The guy made a short film about it here

http://www.andrewnormanwilson.com/WorkersGoogleplex.html

our technofuture

cant wait for eric schmidt and justine tunney to save america

Whoa.

iamdust

Flawless Human Beings » Gina Torres » Gina Torres Alphabet

↳ F → feminism & representation
"I certainly came up in an era where women were really making strides and making a point to beat down doors and find their place, and crash through the glass ceiling. And a lot of them did that believing that they had to trade on their femininity and that they had to be a man and tap into whatever they believed was a masculine trait to hang in the boys’ room, to get the "keys to the kingdom" as it were. And what’s beautiful about Jessica Pearson is that she is the next level to that when, really, feminism is about being all that you are and not having to trade one thing for another on your way up, or apologize." - Gina Torres (about her character Jessica Pearson, on Suits)

ixamxdecadence
hotdamnitsbam:

ctgraphy:

christajnewman:

therealmooki:

antolovich:

girl-with-minnie-ears:

theclichefortunecookie:

johnlockinthetardiswithdestiel:

thecheerfulemo:

Cutest fucking alien in existence

You sure about that


yeah


i’m


pretty


sure



Damn the Disney fandom just reclaimed its post

And belted the crap out of the Whovians

Four for you, Stitch fandom.





Always reblog my baby

hotdamnitsbam:

ctgraphy:

christajnewman:

therealmooki:

antolovich:

girl-with-minnie-ears:

theclichefortunecookie:

johnlockinthetardiswithdestiel:

thecheerfulemo:

Cutest fucking alien in existence

You sure about that

image

yeah

image

image

i’m

image

image

pretty

image

image

sure

image

image

Damn the Disney fandom just reclaimed its post

And belted the crap out of the Whovians

Four for you, Stitch fandom.

Always reblog my baby

ixamxdecadence
geekishchic:

thebigbadafro:

nieceoftheserpent:

theskaldspeaks:

needtherapy:

jnenifre:

From Facebook

After spending years developing a simple machine to make inexpensive sanitary pads, Arunachalam Muruganantham has become the unlikely leader of a menstrual health revolution in rural India. Over sixteen years, Muruganantham’s machine has spread to 1,300 villages in 23 states and since most of his clients are NGOs and women’s self-help groups who produce and sell the pads directly in a “by the women, for the women, and to the women” model, the average machine also provides employment for ten women. Muruganantham’s interest in menstrual health began in 1998 when, as a young, newly married man, he saw his wife, Shanthi, hiding the rags she used as menstrual cloths. Like most men in his village, he had no idea about the reality of menstruation and was horrified that cloths that “I would not even use… to clean my scooter” were his wife’s solution to menstrual sanitation. When he asked why she didn’t buy sanitary pads, she told him that the expense would prevent her from buying staples like milk for the family. Muruganantham, who left school at age 14 to start working, decided to try making his own sanitary pads for less but the testing of his first prototype ran into a snag almost immediately: Muruganantham had no idea that periods were monthly. “I can’t wait a month for each feedback, it’ll take two decades!” he said, and sought volunteers among the women in his community. He discovered that less than 10% of the women in his area used sanitary pads, instead using rags, sawdust, leaves, or ash. Even if they did use cloths, they were too embarrassed to dry them in the sun, meaning that they never got disinfected — contributing to the approximately 70% of all reproductive diseases in India that are caused by poor menstrual hygiene. Finding volunteers was nearly impossible: women were embarrassed, or afraid of myths about sanitary pads that say that women who use them will go blind or never marry. Muruganantham came up with an ingenious solution: “I became the man who wore a sanitary pad,” he says. He made an artificial uterus, filled it with goat’s blood, and wore it throughout the day. But his determination had severe consequences: his village concluded he was a pervert with a sexual disease, his mother left his household in shame and his wife left him. As he remarks in the documentary “Menstrual Man” about his experience, “So you see God’s sense of humour. I’d started the research for my wife and after 18 months she left me!”After years of research, Muruganantham perfected his machine and now works with NGOs and women’s self-help groups to distribute it. Women can use it to make sanitary napkins for themselves, but he encourages them to make pads to sell as well to provide employment for women in poor communities. And, since 23% of girls drop out of school once they start menstruating, he also works with schools, teaching girls to make their own pads: “Why wait till they are women? Why not empower girls?” As communities accepted his machine, opinions of his “crazy” behavior changed. Five and a half years after she left, Shanthi contacted him, and they are now living together again. She says it was hard living with the ostracization that came from his project, but now, she helps spread the word about sanitary napkins to other women. “Initially I used to be very shy when talking to people about it, but after all this time, people have started to open up. Now they come and talk to me, they ask questions and they also get sanitary napkins to try them.”In 2009, Muruganantham was honored with a national Innovation Award in 2009 by then President of India, Pratibha Patil, beating out nearly 1,000 other entries. Now, he’s looking at expanding to other countries and believes that 106 countries could benefit from his invention. Muruganantham is proud to have made such a difference: “from childhood I know no human being died because of poverty — everything happens because of ignorance… I have accumulated no money but I accumulate a lot of happiness.” His proudest moment? A year after he installed one of the machines in a village so poor that, for generations, no one had earned enough for their children to attend school. Then he received a call from one of the women selling sanitary pads who told him that, thanks to the income, her daughter was now able to go to school. To read more about Muruganantham’s story, the BBC featured a recent profile on him at http://bbc.in/1i8tebG or watch his TED talk at http://bit.ly/1n594l6. You can also view his company’s website at http://newinventions.in/To learn more about the 2013 documentary Menstrual Man about Muruganantham, visit http://www.menstrualman.com/For resources to help girls prepare for and understand their periods - including several first period kits - visit our post on: “That Time of the Month: Teaching Your Mighty Girl about Her Menstrual Cycle” at www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=3281To help your tween understand the changes she’s experiencing both physically and emotionally during puberty, check out the books recommended in our post on “Talking with Tweens and Teens About Their Bodies” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=2229And, if you’re looking for ways to encourage your children to become the next engineering and technology innovators, visit A Mighty Girl’s STEM toy section athttp://www.amightygirl.com/toys/toys-games/science-math


Awesome, dude. Awesome. I mean, AWESOME.

WHAT AN EPIC BADASS!

This man is awesome!


Man. You’re doing it right.

geekishchic:

thebigbadafro:

nieceoftheserpent:

theskaldspeaks:

needtherapy:

jnenifre:

From Facebook

After spending years developing a simple machine to make inexpensive sanitary pads, Arunachalam Muruganantham has become the unlikely leader of a menstrual health revolution in rural India. Over sixteen years, Muruganantham’s machine has spread to 1,300 villages in 23 states and since most of his clients are NGOs and women’s self-help groups who produce and sell the pads directly in a “by the women, for the women, and to the women” model, the average machine also provides employment for ten women. 

Muruganantham’s interest in menstrual health began in 1998 when, as a young, newly married man, he saw his wife, Shanthi, hiding the rags she used as menstrual cloths. Like most men in his village, he had no idea about the reality of menstruation and was horrified that cloths that “I would not even use… to clean my scooter” were his wife’s solution to menstrual sanitation. When he asked why she didn’t buy sanitary pads, she told him that the expense would prevent her from buying staples like milk for the family. 

Muruganantham, who left school at age 14 to start working, decided to try making his own sanitary pads for less but the testing of his first prototype ran into a snag almost immediately: Muruganantham had no idea that periods were monthly. “I can’t wait a month for each feedback, it’ll take two decades!” he said, and sought volunteers among the women in his community. He discovered that less than 10% of the women in his area used sanitary pads, instead using rags, sawdust, leaves, or ash. Even if they did use cloths, they were too embarrassed to dry them in the sun, meaning that they never got disinfected — contributing to the approximately 70% of all reproductive diseases in India that are caused by poor menstrual hygiene. 

Finding volunteers was nearly impossible: women were embarrassed, or afraid of myths about sanitary pads that say that women who use them will go blind or never marry. Muruganantham came up with an ingenious solution: “I became the man who wore a sanitary pad,” he says. He made an artificial uterus, filled it with goat’s blood, and wore it throughout the day. But his determination had severe consequences: his village concluded he was a pervert with a sexual disease, his mother left his household in shame and his wife left him. As he remarks in the documentary “Menstrual Man” about his experience, “So you see God’s sense of humour. I’d started the research for my wife and after 18 months she left me!”

After years of research, Muruganantham perfected his machine and now works with NGOs and women’s self-help groups to distribute it. Women can use it to make sanitary napkins for themselves, but he encourages them to make pads to sell as well to provide employment for women in poor communities. And, since 23% of girls drop out of school once they start menstruating, he also works with schools, teaching girls to make their own pads: “Why wait till they are women? Why not empower girls?” 

As communities accepted his machine, opinions of his “crazy” behavior changed. Five and a half years after she left, Shanthi contacted him, and they are now living together again. She says it was hard living with the ostracization that came from his project, but now, she helps spread the word about sanitary napkins to other women. “Initially I used to be very shy when talking to people about it, but after all this time, people have started to open up. Now they come and talk to me, they ask questions and they also get sanitary napkins to try them.”

In 2009, Muruganantham was honored with a national Innovation Award in 2009 by then President of India, Pratibha Patil, beating out nearly 1,000 other entries. Now, he’s looking at expanding to other countries and believes that 106 countries could benefit from his invention. 

Muruganantham is proud to have made such a difference: “from childhood I know no human being died because of poverty — everything happens because of ignorance… I have accumulated no money but I accumulate a lot of happiness.” His proudest moment? A year after he installed one of the machines in a village so poor that, for generations, no one had earned enough for their children to attend school. Then he received a call from one of the women selling sanitary pads who told him that, thanks to the income, her daughter was now able to go to school. 

To read more about Muruganantham’s story, the BBC featured a recent profile on him at http://bbc.in/1i8tebG or watch his TED talk at http://bit.ly/1n594l6. You can also view his company’s website at http://newinventions.in/

To learn more about the 2013 documentary Menstrual Man about Muruganantham, visit http://www.menstrualman.com/

For resources to help girls prepare for and understand their periods - including several first period kits - visit our post on: “That Time of the Month: Teaching Your Mighty Girl about Her Menstrual Cycle” at www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=3281

To help your tween understand the changes she’s experiencing both physically and emotionally during puberty, check out the books recommended in our post on “Talking with Tweens and Teens About Their Bodies” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=2229

And, if you’re looking for ways to encourage your children to become the next engineering and technology innovators, visit A Mighty Girl’s STEM toy section athttp://www.amightygirl.com/toys/toys-games/science-math

Awesome, dude. Awesome. I mean, AWESOME.

WHAT AN EPIC BADASS!

This man is awesome!

Man. You’re doing it right.

snarkbender

Some Thoughts on Race Work and the Ally Disguise

snarkbender:

ultramaricon:

A couple nights ago I attended an interactive talk about African Americans in Oregon history that a colleague and friend offered at the Oregon Historical Society here in Portland. 

The interactive part meant I had to turn around and talk to a retired white, male historian sitting behind me about who we were and why we were there. Within 15 minutes he had called me a “snob” for living in Portland and not the small, conservative town where I teach; accused me and the young woman of color sitting next to him of being “complicit” in the gentrification of historically black North Portland without knowing anything about my racial or economic background; incorrectly tagged me as the beneficiary of the privileges the US gave to elite, white Cuban immigrants in the 1960s; then told me that the idea that African Americans were not allowed to live in Oregon in the late 1800s was “inaccurate and sloppy”—they were publicly and legally whipped (often lynched), taxed, and put to work if they chose to stay in the state, which is “not exactly the same thing.”  Pro-tip: it is the same thing.

He then proceeded to interrupt my friend’s talk with comments that began with phrases like “I believe you’re mistaken when” and “You’re overlooking the fact that.” For example, the speaker told us about how when African Americans, disenfranchised from the public schools in Salem, Oregon, finally raised the money to open their own school, the state waited 6 months then incorporated the school and used the facility to institutionalize racial segregation in the district.  Our white historian man then raised his hand to express disappointment that the speaker had focused on the “negative” side of the story (apparently African Americans opening their own school is negative) and thought this was a “miraculous” example of white liberals finally organizing to provide blacks with an education in Oregon by “opening” one of the first publicly funded black schools. To the speaker’s credit, she laid it out real good (and polite): nothing happened until blacks opened their own damn school, and the talk is simply not about the positive contributions of white politicians but about the lives of blacks in Oregon (see the difference? I know it’s subtle). Repeated comments like these, which did not expand on the talk but ideologically disempowered a woman-of-color historian in a room full of white people, inevitably amounted to one basic grievance: he wanted the talk to be about the wonderful things white liberals have done for African Americans in Oregon, the same timeline of white achievements you can get at the historical society itself, at any museum, most history books, and on Google. 

I believe he thought he was connecting with us. I believe he thought he was even modeling some kind of ethical scholarship. I truly believe he thought he was helping us by offering his “expertise” and what he perceived as constructive criticism. And this level of delusion about his privilege, his importance, and his superiority makes me even angrier at him than if he had just sat there and said “I hate black people.”  

Undermining our work in the guise of an ally is the most covert and egregious form of racism. It digs right into the structures we’ve painstakingly built to repair centuries of economic, social and intellectual disempowerment and pulls them apart with surgical care, one piece at a time, so that the products of black and brown labor can be collected and added to the coffers of white cultural capital.  The stealth racism of allies who feel they have more to teach than to learn obstructs, fractures, and undermines our lives and work in ways the perpetrators can’t even perceive because their perspectives are so aloft with a mistaken sense of wisdom and competence, so drunk with privileges they believe it is their job to mete out at their own discretion, so frenzied with panic over the dissolution of the structural superiority on which their entire identity is based.

Save for listening to and READING THE WORK OF people of color, I think for white, antiracist work, releasing one’s grip on one’s own authority and the impulse to exert this authority in black-led spaces has got to be the very first step.

I’m so grateful to all the Portland denizens who attended the talk to listen, contribute, take notes, and give my friend the respect she deserves as a teacher, historian, and anti-racist community activist. Despite this man’s comments, the talk was only derailed for a few seconds here and there, when the speaker was momentarily shaken by the man’s pedantic tone, but quickly recovered with facts, rhetorical calling out, and sincerity.  The talk was amazing and I learned so much about Oregon, about teaching, and about dialogue in just a couple of hours. I guess I’m writing this not to give the man undue attention, but to start figuring out what exactly it is that power is doing in the room when white people do this, to give other people a working anatomy of this kind of interaction, and to continue the work of thinking about how to effectively respond and move on. 

Peace.    

white people remain irrevocably untrustworthy and ridiculous, even—nay, especially— those who claim to be Otherwise Enlightened

I had a version of this guy happen to me on a panel I did about the Civil War and its aftermath. When someone says Jim Crow laws weren’t that bad since they came from the Black Codes all you can do is eat their face with facts & try not to jump out of your seat to forcibly eject them from the building. Through the roof. I applaud this lecturer’s restraint.