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Esoterica

1wantchange
1wantchange:

Hell 

1wantchange:

Hell 

rustons

hamburgerjack:

rustons:

Did you ever hear about the difficulty of a Black model succeding in the fashion industry of recent years? Did you ever hear about anything like that?

Uh no, I actually didn’t know how hard it was because you know I watched all the interviews with Naomi Campbell and stuff like that. And they asked the same question and she was just like, “It is hard being a Black model knowing that you’re not gonna get a job but you still have to be out there.” And in Australia too, when I go casting, they ask me “Why did your agency send you here and I’m like because this is casting and they just go “We don’t work with Black models.” 

They say that when you go casting in Australia?

Yeah, like the big names. They’ll be like “We don’t work with Black models, so, sorry. Sorry they have to send you all the way here.” And I’m just like ‘No it’s okay, thank you for letting me know.” So yeah, it is hard being a Black model because it’s just impossible but at the same time I don’t wanna think about it as impossible. I want to think about it as possible because we can turn the impossible into possible!

Ajak Deng interviewed by Bethann Hardison 

She didn’t know it was “impossible” because she saw someone like her doing what she wanted to do.

THAT IS WHY WE NEED TO SEE OURSELVES IN THE MEDIA.

And she’s still going, because even though they’re blatantly racist and shooting her down there are still people like her and there is still Naomi Campbell DOING IT

(via hamburgerjack-deactivated201404)

dispirits
notesonascandal:

jayaa:


Uproar as students (from my university) dress as ‘traditional’ Aboriginal people.
The publication of a photograph of university students at an official college function dressed up to look like “traditional” Aboriginal people, with their faces and limbs painted brown, has forced an internal investigation and rapid re-education program.
The eight female students from the co-educational Cromwell College within the University of Queensland were depicted in the photo - taken last Tuesday - with wild hair, holding sticks and wearing material fashioned into makeshift loin cloths.
The photo made its way on to online social networking sites and quickly raised the ire of a number of indigenous Australians from around the country. At least one contacted the college and the university directly, sparking the investigation.
Read More

People are arguing about this on our Stalkerspace page and this one particular girl keeps saying dumb ass shit like “I just had to write a 3000 word assignment on how aboriginals have been affected by ‘white’ people. I understand all the shit that went down. However, dressing up in order to celebrate their culture i fail to see how it’s as bad as you guys are making it out to be. As previously said, sure they could have went about it better, but do intentions count for nothing?”
gurl
pls
stop

There is nothing celebratory about this picture. Your intentions count for shit. What they could have done better is to have not done it at all. 
This is racist and anti-Black. Period. Fuck them and anybody that thinks it’s ok.

notesonascandal:

jayaa:

Uproar as students (from my university) dress as ‘traditional’ Aboriginal people.

The publication of a photograph of university students at an official college function dressed up to look like “traditional” Aboriginal people, with their faces and limbs painted brown, has forced an internal investigation and rapid re-education program.

The eight female students from the co-educational Cromwell College within the University of Queensland were depicted in the photo - taken last Tuesday - with wild hair, holding sticks and wearing material fashioned into makeshift loin cloths.

The photo made its way on to online social networking sites and quickly raised the ire of a number of indigenous Australians from around the country. At least one contacted the college and the university directly, sparking the investigation.

Read More

People are arguing about this on our Stalkerspace page and this one particular girl keeps saying dumb ass shit like “I just had to write a 3000 word assignment on how aboriginals have been affected by ‘white’ people. I understand all the shit that went down. However, dressing up in order to celebrate their culture i fail to see how it’s as bad as you guys are making it out to be. As previously said, sure they could have went about it better, but do intentions count for nothing?”

gurl

pls

stop

There is nothing celebratory about this picture. Your intentions count for shit. What they could have done better is to have not done it at all. 

This is racist and anti-Black. Period. Fuck them and anybody that thinks it’s ok.

Indigenous Australians were classfied as ‘Flora and Fauna’ until 1967.

liberationista:

Just gonna leave this here for anyone who believes that Australia is not a racist country.

We’ve only recognised Indigenous Australians as fully human for less than 50 years. It takes a lot longer than that to gain full equality and justice for survivors of colonialism and systematic oppression.

(via b-binaohan-deactivated20140530)

jojazm
deliciouskaek:

dreams-from-my-father:

brombie:

aeropig:

26th of January isAustralia DayInvasion Day
Without forgetting the past, here is to a better future together.

together? how about I kill all my people off and then kill myself? HERES TO A BETTER FUTURE, YEAHHH

White people are the worst thing that ever happened to humanity SMH!

“without forgetting the past, let’s just forget the past and focus on people like me!”
*waiting for someone to tell me this is beautiful too*

deliciouskaek:

dreams-from-my-father:

brombie:

aeropig:

26th of January isAustralia DayInvasion Day

Without forgetting the past, here is to a better future together.

together? how about I kill all my people off and then kill myself? HERES TO A BETTER FUTURE, YEAHHH

White people are the worst thing that ever happened to humanity SMH!

“without forgetting the past, let’s just forget the past and focus on people like me!”

*waiting for someone to tell me this is beautiful too*

(via deliciouskaek)

renoriginal

Hip hop?? Yeah, well YOU can stop: exploitative workshops targeting Indigenous kids

renoriginal:

I have a gripe, and that gripe is the proliferation of hip hop workshops targeted at Indigenous mob, particularly young fullas. You may think that this is weird, a long term, hard core Indigenous hiphop-head who doesn’t believe in hip hop workshops? Well, let me explain. I love hip hop. I grew up on hip hop. I’ve taken a hell of a lot, and learned a hell of a lot from hip hop. I do believe that it can give a voice to the voiceless.  My issue with these workshops is the exploitation and paternalism that is rampant is so many of these programs. This is not an attack on all programs, because there are some good ones out there that do great work, nor is this breakdown based on one group in particular. This is my opinion, in consultation with other Indigenous practitioners, on some of the biggest issues we have seen with these programs. Let’s have the discussion so we can get this out in the open and hopefully change things around for the better.

Disadvantage: we KNOW, nearly every, if not all, indicator of disadvantage shows Indigenous people as the most disadvantaged group in Australian society. WE LIVE IT EVERY DAMN DAY!!! Personally, I believe that it is hard to build anything positive from a foundation where you want to push the disadvantage aspect so damn hard!!! Don’t sugar coat it, don’t over look it. Recognise it. Don’t harp on it. And don’t you dare exploit it so that you can get funding, build a profile for yourself, or make yourself sleep easier at night because you’re ticking off your good deed. Like Tina Turner said, we don’t need another hero. We don’t need saviours. There are many programs out there that have been designed WITH Indigenous people, not FOR us. We don’t need you to tell us HOW to turn our lives around. The biggest thing is for you to recognise and try to understand our story. Most importantly, YOU CANNOT HAVE EMPOWERMENT THROUGH REINFORCING DISADVANTAGE.

At risk youth: if you don’t have the skills to work with at-risk kids, you can do more harm than if you had done nothing. Someone else then has to deal with the aftermath and most often it is not the fly-by-night program providers. I’m not even going to try and delve into diversionary programs at this time.

Paternalism: If you don’t know what this word means, look it up. I’m going to go out on a limb and say that paternalism underlies just about every government policy to date. It’s why they are guaranteed to fail so miserably. If you want a current example of paternalism, look at the NT Intervention. Many of these hip hop programs are done without ANY consultation or involvement from  Indigenous people. Put simply, they are done FOR us. We don’t need you to tell us how to improve our lives. That is paternalism.  If you have skills that would be of benefit to pass on, work WITH us. As the saying goes, the road to hell is paved with good intentions. Good intentions don’t make a program right. Not by a long stretch. I have often asked people involved in workshop programs a very simple question as to their interest in this work, and that question is: why? There are not many that can answer this question in a way that is not intrinsically paternalistic. When people can’t recognise that, and try to address it, then there is a problem.

Let’s think for a minute, lets imagine that I decide one day, with no experience or background in the religion, that I had a vision for lets say Jewish kids. So I decided that they should do hip hop and off I go. I identify that there’s targeted funding for programs with these kids, which I promptly apply for, I might have a meeting over coffee with a few Jewish friends of friends, and off I go running my workshops. Hey, some kids might not engage, but I’ve got this one that will and I’m going to push them. Got their track, got their picture, I’m going to use it to push my program… Can you imagine the outrage if I started going into the Jewish community with my vision for their kids!! Let’s also say that I am from a different religious group, let’s say I’m catholic, which I never openly declare in my promotional material, but you know, I have some words to the kids about how great my religion is while I work with them and ‘gently encourage’ to consider conversion. This happens with some programs with Aboriginal kids!! Do you know why people can get away with this? Because you are dealing with one of the most disadvantaged group in society!!! Funders very rarely want to fund culturally appropriate programs with long term sustainable outcomes because they rely on quantitative outcomes over a short term.

Mob!! We need to stop making it so easy for just any program to have access to our kids! Exercise some quality control and guidance. Instead of us bitching about this provider and that provider on the quiet. Lets start pulling them up and making them accountable! If they don’t have a reasonable number of Aboriginal employees with a reasonable level of training and experience, and if they don’t have meaningful cosultation processes: don’t support them. It is that simple.

Self-determination: Said it before, I’ll say it again (and again, and again) you have NO place in Indigenous issues if you do not have an understanding of self-determination. Contrary to what many governments would have us believe, self determination is NOT a dirty word. It is the only way to achieve sustainable, long-term change. Many of these programs have NO understanding of self-determination, let alone know how to incorporate it into their programs. Go do some research on it and then come back and see me.

Skills: Seriously, how many ‘never were’s’ are we going to keep sustaining through these programs? There are quite a few artists that basically only have a name through riding off their ‘Indigenous workshops’ portfolio. They have no respect within the scene that they claim to have mad skills in! So what skills are you passing on again??

Relevance: believe it or not, not every Indigenous kid is into hip hop. Nor are they all at risk. Nor are they all into sports. We’re a diverse mob, with diverse interests, including musically. Needs also change geographically. One size does not fit all. How do you know what the community you’re working with needs? YOU WORK WITH IT!!! You don’t take a program to a community, you develop one WITH them!

Exploitation: if you are using the workshops & kids to promote your name: you’re being exploitive. If you don’t have a reputation except for pushing these workshops: you’re being exploitive. If you take usage of the products of the workshop and it’s easier to find out your name than the name of the kids that actually did it: that’s exploitation. If you’re in it purely for the money and access to grants: that’s exploitation. If you push ‘them’ to promote ‘you’: that’s exploitation. If you take intellectual property rights: that’s exploitation. If you don’t follow protocols around Indigenous culture: that’s exploitation. If your program isn’t giving something back to the community: that’s exploitation. If you undercut Indigenous artists: that’s exploitation. If you’re taking money away from properly constructed programs: THAT’S FUCKED!!!

Also, do not put the terms ‘Indigenous’, ‘Aboriginal’, ‘Mob’ etc in your name unless you actually are an Indigenous business (looking at you Indigenous Hip Hop Projects). If you are a religious based or funded program, be up front about it so Indigenous parents can make an informed decision as to what they are exposing their children to.

Gatekeepers: These organisations/individuals often become gatekeepers for the broader community wanting to access Indigenous music and musicians. Whether it’s intentional or not, these organizations usually focus on forging a profile for themselves, rather than an outcome for others. When non-Indigenous Australians want to access Indigenous musicians, because they don’t know any better themselves, and because of the number of issues associated with the profile of Indigenous music (which is a whole other post) they will often go to these groups in the first instance as that’s what they are aware of. How many Indigenous music panels/forums will have 1 indigenous artist, and then the rest of the panel members made up of Non-Indigenous (including ‘migrant “Indigenous”’ people as well), talking about Indigenous music!!! This has GOT TO STOP!! Two big issues that arise out of this is that often, these groups will only recommend artists that they work with. Secondly, if they do youth work, they often push these kids forward too fast. This can actually hamper, rather than develop, a musical career (again, a whole other post). It perpetuates the stereotype that Indigenous music is underdeveloped and childlike. It also means that upcoming Indigenous musicians get looked over yet again for gigs.

Indigenous music: Often these groups get a lot of media attention for the kids tracks. After all, this is the ‘easy’, ‘cute’ ‘soft and fluffy’ stuff that media is willing to cover when it comes to Indigenous issues. Not entirely bad in itself, but the kids aren’t necessary trying to have a career in the music industry and, generally, this is their first (and often last) track. Can you imagine if you had heard your favourite muso from their very first attempt at music? So let’s take it further, if said producer is pretty crap, as can often be the case, and/or they don’t have the skills to develop the kids lyricism… I hope you get the picture of where this can leave the final product, which is then promoted by the workshop providers. It’s often treated as a gimic, and the attention that it is given creates the impression that this is where Indigenous hip hop is at. There are many Indigenous hip hop artists who are dope, there have been for YEARS, but they often get overlooked because these organisations are acting as the gatekeepers and/or ‘experts’ of Indigenous music.

 

Finally, NO-ONE should have a vision for Indigenous kids but those kids themselves. To make your vision their vision is paternalism and it is not addressing disadvantage. Instead, support these kids to believe in themselves. Provide a safe space for them to be themselves. Help support them to deal with the racism that we face each and every damn day!!! Help make those opportunities to develop further if that’s what’s wanted. Train them to be a trainer themselves if that’s what they want. Provide opportunities, including employment, for Indigenous musicians who are often overlooked and ostracised from the industries. Most importantly, do not be so arrogant as to presume that you know better than Indigenous communities themselves.

No program working with Indigenous communities should dare even consider itself legitimate without real input and inclusion of Indigenous people themselves. Otherwise it’s just a case of history repeating itself.

 

*I welcome comments and discussion on this post.  I take ownership over any structural, spelling or grammar issues so please do not engage if that is going to be your only contribution.  Thanks to those that contributed, you know who you are.*

(via karenhealey)

While it is rare to find such a direct statement of a slave past as that of James Brown, it is safe to presume for the majority experience for black convicts transported between 1788-1820 their formative experience had been of slavery, be it in North America, or the West Indies, or the slave
ships intercepted. After 1820 the penal colonies VDL and NSW began to receive a new kind of African convict: chattel slaves transported directly from Mauritius and the Caribbean.

Bruce, a slave who arrived in NSW in 1821 had been sentenced to life in St Vincent in the West Indies. Bruce was unusual in that the slave status of convicts sent from British colonies was rarely stated on the official documentation, a reflection of some kind of official squeamishness about being complicit in the slaving business. Bruce was transported at some considerable cost, since his master would have been compensated for the loss of his property. In those cases where slave owners had not managed to get their property returned, I would guess that the offence was an act of retaliation or rebellion. Certainly that was the case for Sophie, a Malagasy slave from Mauritius who had set fire to her mistress’ barn. She was found guilty of a breach of her mistress’ trust — an interesting concept in a master-slave relationship — and sentenced to death. Transportation to NSW was a condition of her pardon. Her owner was compensated for the
worth of Sophie, and her compensation included the worth of the baby that Sophie had given birth to while in prison. There is no record of the child arriving in NSW. Likewise the slave Theresa, a native of Madagascar, was transported from Mauritius in the same year, guilty of assault on her master and child. She went to strike the child with a hoe and when her master tried to stop her she had seized his testicles and squeezed so hard that he fainted. She admitted her violence was retaliation for the brutal treatment she had received. Her owner was well-compensated for the loss of his troublesome property.

Attempting to kill one’s master was not an uncommon capital offence. Two child slaves, Constance, aged eight, and Elizabeth, aged twelve, were found guilty of trying to poison their mistress and transported to NSW for life. Poison was a favourite weapon of rebellious slaves. Over 50% of attempted murder and murder cases involved poison. Yet Maria, a slave from the remote mahogany-cutting British settlements around Belize on the Bay of Honduras, used a knife.

At first there was only an occasional trickle of slaves from the colonies, but this traffic dramatically increased as the anti-slavery movement in Britain grew louder and more persistent. Although the slave trade had ended in 1808, the complete abolition of slavery in the British colonies did not finally come until 1838. After 1830, the slave colonies, notably those in the West Indies, sought transportation as a means to control a dangerously restive slave population excited by rumours of impending emancipation.

Between 1830 and 1838 at least eighteen slave colonies were able to transport hundreds of their troublesome black chattel to Australia.

Cassandra Pybus, A Touch of the Tar: African settlers in colonial Australia and the implications for issues of Aboriginality  (2001)

So basically Creole Mauritians have slave heritage and we come at least partially from Madagascar, where obviously our ancestors were Malagasy. This passage describes and analyses how slaves were transported as convicts to what was then Van Diemen’s Land and NSW (now part of Australia), and for what purposes.  From 1788, Indigenous peoples and lands are colonised by the British. Pybus states that from 1820, slaves were transported as convicts from Madagascar in Africa, and from Belize and islands/countries in the Caribbean. Pybus contradicts the other historian which I read today whom said that there was a Black convict specifically from Madagascar on the First Fleet in 1788. 

Pybus also talks about some of the content of slave resistance, and the costs of that resistance. This turning the slave into a convict weaves neatly into the wider slave resistances happening across British colonies which through transportation of resisting slaves, the British tried to quell. 

So basically our people were dehumanised as slaves and some were then doubly dehumanised as convicts. But then dehumanised is an inappropriate word because our ancestors were never even allowed to be human in the first place.

(via leonineantiheroine)

(via leonineantiheroine-deactivated2)

Video shows bloody ending to teen joyride

leonineantiheroine:

http://m.news.com.au/TopStories/pg/0/fi1171757.htm

A POLICE officer unleashed a series of savage blows to the head of a teenager bleeding from a bullet wound to the neck during a brutal arrest early yesterday.

Moments after he was pulled from a mangled car wreck in Kings Cross, Sydney, shocking footage shows police repeatedly striking Troy Taylor before dragging his limp body across the street.

An officer then places a knee on the teen’s blood-soaked back to handcuff him.

The 18-year-old, one of two teenagers shot by police during a dramatic chase, is then left lying in a pool of blood as dozens of stunned bystanders look on.

The teenagers, one just 14, were in a serious condition in St Vincent’s Hospital last night.

—-

All of the boys and young men are Aboriginal. Yep they did the wrong thing by driving the car onto the pavement but also they seemed to be frightened of the police and there was no need for the cop to bash the kid after the car crashed. 

This is what Mick Mundine had to say:

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/mick-mundine-horrified-by-video-of-arrest-of-shooting-victim-troy-taylor-in-kings-cross/story-e6freuy9-1226335217914

ABORIGINAL elder Mick Mundine was shocked and stunned by the way police arrested shooting victim Troy Taylor, 18, describing it as “pathetic.”

“It’s very wrong - this has to stop,” Mr Mundine said.

The respected Aboriginal community leader watched the dramatic and disturbing video footage in the offices of The Sunday Telegraph yesterday.

“I mean, how are they training them? What’s the training for? Where’s the commonsense?” said an emotional Mr Mundine, who is working with respected Redfern police commander, Superintendent Luke Freudenstein, to calm tensions in the inner-city suburb.

“They never had guns in the car, so why did they even shoot the kids?”

(via leonineantiheroine-deactivated2)

Esoterica: To some of the Aussies clogging up up the Indigenous tag

deluxvivens:

thesavagesalad:

thesavagesalad:

TW: talks on genocide, racism, privilege denial, Australians who don’t know history

Namely those who are quite upset by the PM losing her shoe and have now resorted to engaging in hateful rhetoric directed at the Australian Indigenous communities.

Man i had to hear about abuse at a residential indian school today from the spouse of a survivor. I’m  renewing my commitment to not giving a fuck about hurt feefees on this topic.

(via deluxvivens-deactivated20130417)

To some of the Aussies clogging up up the Indigenous tag

thesavagesalad:

thesavagesalad:

TW: talks on genocide, racism, privilege denial, Australians who don’t know history

Namely those who are quite upset by the PM losing her shoe and have now resorted to engaging in hateful rhetoric directed at the Australian Indigenous communities.

I’ve noticed a few trends going on in the racist, ignorant and possibly written-in-an-inebriated-state, rage posts. And it’s only fair to address these things.

1. There is this misunderstanding that the genocide and ill treatment of Indigenous Australians “happened” 200 years ago. Allow me to correct you (Aussie to Aussie of course, because some of you seem rather flustered when a non Aussie attempts to address your racist disposition)- The Genocide and ill treatment of Indigenous Australians STARTED roughly 200 years ago.

The effects of the genocide, the negligence and abuse by the government, the ongoing institutional oppression of them is still happening today. Whilst you were mourning over the PM’s lost shoe, the NTER was (and is) still running. Police brutality against Indigenous Australians is still happening. The rates of infant mortality, sexual abuse and assault are still disproportionately higher in comparison to the general population. If it comforts you in the slightest- the PM will get another pair of shoes. However, these issues will not experience such an instant fix.

2. Many of you seem quite upset by the fact that Indigenous Australians can access a free education. Now this surprises me because we do have government schools where education is free (and if there are certain payments to be made, government subsidies can still be applied for) which is available to all Australians. And even up to a tertiary level (though the HECS is far from perfect) there are still ways of lessening the financial burden- provided by private and public institutions which all Australians can access.

3. Since we’re talking about university, I’ve also observed a lot of anger due to the fact that apparently Indigenous Australians can get a “free ride” into university because they apparently “swim in” scholarships.

Again- if you actually took the time to research our nation’s Universities, you’d notice that despite there being 2-3 max Indigenous focus scholarships per uni, there are plenty more scholarships on top of that which any Australian and apply for if you meet a set of requirements (and fun fact, even the Indigenous focused scholarships have a set of requirements to meet as well). Also, another point to be made- Indigenous Australians are not exempt from HECS.

4. Many of you seem quite bitter about how Indigenous Australians apparently get free-to-access dole. And the fact that you cannot access such magic dole which you seem to blame Indigenous Australians for. In the time that it took for you to write your hate post, if you had done some research- you would have learnt that applications  for the dole are open to all. It doesn’t mean that you will get the dole (because you have to meet certain requirements to qualify for it) but the same way your application will go through a process of assessment- so will an Indigenous Australian’s ( and they must meet a set of requirements as well). And where there will be some application that will be accepted, there will be those which will be rejected- the same applies to Indigenous applicants as well.

I would go into further detail on the numerous ways the Indigenous community here has been abused by the government institutionally and individual wise, or the 5 acts of genocide this community has experienced- but the Prime Minister losing her shoe, or a flag being burnt (because those who wrapped themselves in the flag as they participated in the Cronulla Riots are not offensive at all.), or you not knowing that you can access a lot of these things which you accuse Indigenous Australians for- is clearly more important than all that.


Reblogging again because there is a hate post on how Indigenous Australians Are The Worst because they can get cheap milk in Western Australia.

Fun fact: EVERYONE IN WESTERN AUSTRALIA CAN GET CHEAP MILK

$2.00 FOR 2 LITRES WHAT A BARGAIN YOU PEOPLE ARE RUNNING OUT OF EXCUSES GO TO FUCKING COLES BEFORE POSTING THIS SHIT

(via womanistgamergirl)