mizjenkins

Black History: The Divine Nine

mizjenkins:

The National Pan-Hellenic Council was established in an age when racial segregation and disenfranchisement plagued African-Americans, the rise of each of the black fraternities and sororities that make up the NPHC bore witness to the fact that despite hardships African Americans refused to accede to a status of inferiority.

The organization’s stated purpose and mission in 1930:

Unanimity of thought and action as far as possible in the conduct of Greek letter collegiate fraternities and sororities, and to consider problems of mutual interest to its member organizations.

The founding members of the NPHC were Kappa Alpha Psi, Omega Psi Phi, Alpha Kappa Alpha, Delta Sigma Theta and Zeta Phi Beta. The council’s membership expanded as Alpha Phi Alpha (1931), Phi Beta Sigma (1931), Sigma Gamma Rho (1937), and Iota Phi Theta (1997) joined this coalition of Black Greek letter organizations (BGLOs).

In his book on BGLOs, Lawrence Ross coined the phrase “The Divine Nine” when referring to the coalition.

notesonascandal
notesonascandal:

reverseracism:

The ignorance…

When they get a White History Month, what the fuck are we gonna talk about?? All the same shit we’ve BEEN talking about forever in all the other damn months?? Are we gonna be learning some new shit about the dominant culture? Please. Explain it to me? 

notesonascandal:

reverseracism:

The ignorance…

When they get a White History Month, what the fuck are we gonna talk about?? All the same shit we’ve BEEN talking about forever in all the other damn months?? Are we gonna be learning some new shit about the dominant culture? Please. Explain it to me? 

deliciouskaek
racemash:

auntada:

“The Congressman-elect is a bright mulatto of good address. He is an effective stump-speaker, and is very popular with his race, while enjoying the friendship of many white people in his district. He is very ambitious to do something toward elevating his race, and he will be pretty sure to be heard from when the new Congress assembles.”
Harper’s Weekly, March 2, 1889
The Honorable Henry Plummer Cheatham (R-NC), the only African American member of Congress in 1889. Cheatham, a graduate of historic Shaw University, served in Congress from 1889 to 1893.

I’m having 2008 election flashbacks when people (including his current VP Biden) said similar shit about Obama. Like over 100 years later. 

racemash:

auntada:

“The Congressman-elect is a bright mulatto of good address. He is an effective stump-speaker, and is very popular with his race, while enjoying the friendship of many white people in his district. He is very ambitious to do something toward elevating his race, and he will be pretty sure to be heard from when the new Congress assembles.”

Harper’s Weekly, March 2, 1889

The Honorable Henry Plummer Cheatham (R-NC), the only African American member of Congress in 1889. Cheatham, a graduate of historic Shaw University, served in Congress from 1889 to 1893.

I’m having 2008 election flashbacks when people (including his current VP Biden) said similar shit about Obama. Like over 100 years later. 

notesonascandal
thehuskybro:

I am watching Slavery By Another Name
“These are the “Good Ol’ Days” that Rick Santorum wish America to go back to,  Rick Santorum ain’t worth a damn! http://huskybro.com/post/6352263427/white-america-was-great”
 36 others are also watching  Slavery By Another Name on GetGlue.com

thehuskybro:

I am watching Slavery By Another Name

“These are the “Good Ol’ Days” that Rick Santorum wish America to go back to, Rick Santorum ain’t worth a damn! http://huskybro.com/post/6352263427/white-america-was-great”

36 others are also watching Slavery By Another Name on GetGlue.com

daniellemertina

re black women & black history

daniellemertina:

My school is focusing on black women for this year’s Black History Month in order to be in line with this year’s national BHM theme of “Black Women in American Culture and History” and someone, a black male (in the community, not at my school… and supposedly a member of the local chapter of the NAACP), complained to those in charge that “no black men would attend” because they would “not benefit” from the events.

Wow. This is black male sexism in action.

Every year, my school has predominantly focused on black men… simply because no gender was specified and whenever that happens women are naturally cast to the side. Unless there is a specific initiative to remember the accomplishments of black women, only black men are remembered. That’s a fact. A decision to focus on women is an attempt to more fully remember black history, because there is no way that men can ever be forgotten. MLK and Malcolm X will be in every Black History Month regardless. (My Sorors) Daisy Bates and Dorothy Height will not.

But what bothers me most is the notion that a black man cannot receive anything from programming specifically about black women. This is exemplary male arrogance. A man’s experience is universal, but that of a woman is only confined to her interests.

It’s also interesting because the committee is predominantly made up of female students. It is also headed by a female student. I know my Sorority is putting on an entire week of programming for Black History Month. YET, women are maligned as not important enough to focus on our specific issues and concerns. And the bravery of our foremothers.

The man who responded to this sexist critique has a feminist consciousness, so he responded more than adequately. But, it alludes me that black men feel as if they are the only ones who truly matter in black history.

It points to a bigger problem. Black men feel as if they are the only ones who matter everywhere. Black History Month is nominal, but this notion extends to institutional racism and racial injustice (generally speaking) as well.

Black men feel as if racism primarily concerns them. The black man’s attitude is “give me rights because I’m a man too” and then I’ll be nice to my black woman and my black children. Not much has changed from decades ago when that was the black movement’s nearly official stance.

Meanwhile the black woman remains the mule of the world. Muted. Expected to aid in muting herself, in order to “uplift” the black man. And that starts with Black History Month. We are good enough to put on the month, but not good enough to focus on ourselves when it comes around. We are good enough to have the black man’s back when he struggling, but not good enough for him to do the same thing.

Ya’ll need to come correct. This is 2012.

bad-dominicana

volviomarilia:


Dominican Republic   The Dominican Republic occupies the eastern two thirds of the island called Hispaniola (Little Spain), which it shares with Haiti. In 1496 it became the site of the first European colony in the Western Hemisphere, with the city of Santo Domingo as the Spanish administrative capital for all the Americas. The early settlers enslaved many of the indigenous Taino people to work in their gold mines and brutality and disease all but wiped out a population of around one million in 50 years. With local labour in short supply, the gold hungry colonists made Santo Domingo the first destination for enslaved Africans in America, a substantial ‘cargo’ of 5000 arriving in 1511. The discovery of gold and silver in Mexico (1520) and Peru (1533) sparked a massive flight by Spanish colonists in the 1520s, as slaves were being forced to work Santo Domingo’s gold deposits to exhaustion. The Spanish abandoned the island almost overnight, the exodus leaving only a few thousand white settlers and their slaves to raise livestock and supply passing ships. Buccaneers gradually began to arrive in the west, in what is now Haiti followed by French colonists, eventually forcing Spain to cede the area to France in 1697. The French territory, Saint Domingue, developed into the worlds largest sugar producer, while Spanish towns in what is now the Dominican Republic continued to stagnate. By 1790 the colony’s 125,000 residents broke down into 40,000 white landowners, 25,000 black freemen, and 60,000 slaves, whereas in St. Domingue half a million enslaved Africans constituted 80% of the total population. The sugar industry did grow during the 18th Century, but it was mostly terminated by the slave revolt in Saint Domingue in 1791. In 1801 Haitian leader Toussaint Louverture invaded the east of the island, liberating some 40,000 slaves, and prompting most of the slave owning elite to flee to Cuba and Puerto Rico. The Spanish re-established slavery when they regained control of the east in 1809, and began sending slavers (slave ships) on expeditions into the newly independent Haiti. The Haitians invaded again in 1821, freeing all the slaves and the Dominican Republic finally declared its independence in 1844.

bad-dominicana
baddominicana:

newwavefeminism:

submitted by grrrl-powr : 

I just really want your opinion on this. It’s kind of sad that I know this guy personally.

thats how pervasive anti-black racism is… it convinces everyone that there is only one type of “aint bout shit” black person who can’t help but live a pathological life of destruction. Especially when there are next to zero non-stereotypical/non-negative representations of Black Americans in the mass media. Unfortunately, some blacks who  who don’t fit the popular, erroneous stereotype, instead of thinking “i guess the way we construct African Americans is flawed, I should challenge this!” buy into the pervasive anti-black sentiment of this country & instead become self righteous, judgmental specal snowflakes.
happy black history month -_-

yes, you can be black and anti-black.

baddominicana:

newwavefeminism:

submitted by grrrl-powr : 

I just really want your opinion on this. It’s kind of sad that I know this guy personally.

thats how pervasive anti-black racism is… it convinces everyone that there is only one type of “aint bout shit” black person who can’t help but live a pathological life of destruction. Especially when there are next to zero non-stereotypical/non-negative representations of Black Americans in the mass media. Unfortunately, some blacks who  who don’t fit the popular, erroneous stereotype, instead of thinking “i guess the way we construct African Americans is flawed, I should challenge this!” buy into the pervasive anti-black sentiment of this country & instead become self righteous, judgmental specal snowflakes.

happy black history month -_-

yes, you can be black and anti-black.