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Esoterica

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Help "The Unwritten Rules" get funding for a Season 2!

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From the site:

“the Unwritten Rules” Web Series

When I wrote the book, ”40 Hours and Unwritten Rule: The Diary of a Nigger, Negro, Colored, Black, African-American Woman” in 2003, I wanted to create a voice that had been silenced, judged, and disregarded. And eight years later, that voice was resurrected with “the Unwritten Rules”. 

“the Unwritten Rules” is a web series based on the book, “40 Hours and Unwritten Rule” (Butterfly Ink Publishing, 2004). The series follows a Black woman’s, Racey Jones, journey in a predominantly white workplace with real situations, truthful thoughts, and honest reactions. With Season 1, the voice was heard globally (ie. US, the UK, Australia, South Africa, the Caribbean) and embraced by Black & White and Young & Old. And for Season 2, we want to speak louder! But we can’t do it without your help.

“the Unwritten Rules” stars Aasha Davis (‘Pariah’, ‘South of Nowhere’, ‘Friday Night Lights’), Balbinka, Sara Finely, David Lowe, Kayla Ibarra, Ebenzer Quaye, and Antonio Ramirez. The series is Written and Executive Produced by me (Kim Williams). I have 16 years experience in Television and Film Production working as an Associate Producer/Post Supervisor. I’ve also written two novels (butterflyinkpublishing.com), as well as, Co-written and Produced the theatrical play, “Bitch” (bitchtheplay.com). Aasha Davis and Michelle Clay also serve as Producers on the series.

The web series has received an overflow of positive response and has been featured on The Grio.com’s 6 Web Series to Watch List, Sister 2 Sister’s 9 Web Series to Watch List , clutchmagazine.com, TheUrban Daily.com, Womanist Musings BlogAol.com, and many more.

To watch Season 1 episodes, go to www.theunwrittenrulesseries.com

Kim Williams (Creator, Writer, Producer)


Have you helped a Black filmmaker’s voice get heard?

Well she needs $22000.

Support Black film and media.

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examiner.com


The Three Black Princesses is a German fairy tale collected by the Brothers Grimm.
A fisherman becomes a burgomaster of a town in East India after he receives six hundred dollars for this son. The son escapes from his captor and discovers an enchanted castle with three black princesses.
He can free them from the spell only if he does exactly what they tell him. However, the boy listens to his mother’s advice and drops hot candle wax on each of the princesses faces.
The girls turn half white as a result. His actions doom the castle and the princesses to be cursed forever.
In fear, the boy jumps out the window, breaking his leg. The castle sinks into the ground and is never seen again.

The Three Black Princesses is a German fairy tale collected by the Brothers Grimm.

A fisherman becomes a burgomaster of a town in East India after he receives six hundred dollars for this son. The son escapes from his captor and discovers an enchanted castle with three black princesses.

He can free them from the spell only if he does exactly what they tell him. However, the boy listens to his mother’s advice and drops hot candle wax on each of the princesses faces.

The girls turn half white as a result. His actions doom the castle and the princesses to be cursed forever.

In fear, the boy jumps out the window, breaking his leg. The castle sinks into the ground and is never seen again.

(via masteradept)

sourcedumal

Have you helped a Black writer get their voice heard today?

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Well here’s your chance!

Kickstarter for “Wanted” Update: SUCCESS! Wanted has successfully raised $3800 for their show!!!!

Lets keep this up, you guys!

Kickstarter for “13 Women” Needs 15000 in 43 days!

Kickstarter for “Nefetari: The Series”

Adding in more:

Indiegogo for Season 2 of “The Unwritten Rules”

“the Unwritten Rules” is a web series based on the book, “40 Hours and Unwritten Rule” (Butterfly Ink Publishing, 2004). The series follows a Black woman’s, Racey Jones, journey in a predominantly white workplace with real situations, truthful thoughts, and honest reactions.

The first season is available on youtube here

Needs $22000 in 50 days!

(via sourcedumal)

In South Africa, jealous white women decided that freed women, by their dress and manner, had become “unseemly and vexing to the public” and in 1765 they were forbidden to wear “colored silk clothing, hoopskirts, fine laces, adorned bonnets, curled hair or earrings.” One can understand the vexation over silks, but forbidding a mulatto to walk in public with her hair in curls a hundred fifty years before the invention of the straightening iron was an early and ominous indication of the white South African talent for fine-tuned racial sadism.

orlando patterson, “slavery and social death” (via ourcatastrophe)

(via educationforliberation)

thinkspeakstress

The Unwritten Rules… a webseries by a WoC, HELL YESSSS.

sourcedumal:

thinkspeakstress:

I’m really hopeful because from what I’ve seen, there’s been no transphobia, no homophobia, no racist bullshit (the show is about racism that woc, specifically Black women, encounter on the job/daily life, but you get what I mean), SHFIODHFIOSAHFIOHFIASODFHOIAFHOA.

Y’ALL. BLACK WOMEN DOING SHIT.

SHOWIN Y’ALL HOW WE GET IT DONE

BLACK WOMEN GIVEN POSITIVE REPRESENTATION IN THE MEDIA

BLACK WOMEN RUNNING SHIT

The Unwritten Rules, which I’ve written about before, is one of my favorite web shows. It’s about a young Black woman—played by Aasha Davis—working and living in white spaces, and it deals with the very real isses that we as Black women face, but in a funny way. Seriously, it’s hilarious! So much of the stuff we laugh about on tumblr is covered in this show, which makes me die even more. XD

Season two is gonna be on the way, but first they need some money!

Black women writing and representing us in a positive light. Women of color being given a voice that’s positive! And the best part? There is barely any problematic material whatsoever. I say “barely” because maybe something might have gone under my radar. But I can safely say that I only side eye’d once while watching this show, and that was in an episode that explored her feelings of displacement amongst white people and also amongst Black people (it addressed real insecurity, though; not being deemed Black enough. BUT. Maybe it was just me, but the portrayal of “Black Black” was over the top.)

But seriously, I flat out recommend this show to every single one of y’all.

Every one of their episodes is on youtube so you can watch allll of season one (12 episodes, each around 6,7 minutes long, but they get progressively longer. The longest is 12 minutes) here! (Link to the “Unwritten Rules Playlist on youtube. All of the episodes are there! The order is: Trailer, “What is the Unwritten Rules?” and then the show episodes. You can choose what to watch through the list on the side, though!) Just a heads up, though; for some reason, the playlist runs BACKWARDS. So be sure to scroll down and choose episode 1, lol.

To see Kim William (the creator of The Unwritten Rules) talking about the purpose of the show and why she created it, you can watch this short little clip here. This video is also included in the playlist.

To donate, check out the indiegogo page.

Black women gettin shit done. What say you?

I have been signal boosting this indiegogo page every day for the past week.

She needs 25k in the next month and a half.

Black voices need to be heard.

DONATE TO THIS CAUSE.

twerks4loanpayments

Soooooooo, just a quick question

aunaturale4life:

If Kanye and Kim don’t get married BEFORE Kim has this child will y’all jump down her throat, condemn her, and say that she’s a bad woman because she “didn’t do it right”?

Cuz a lot of people jumped down all of the throats of black women who had children out of wedlock when Beyonce announced her pregnancy.

But, then again, I don’t think people will since Kim’s not a black woman and apparently only black women need to be chastised for having children out of wedlock *sarcasm*

Just wondering

Why ask questions we already know the answer to though? I mean, no one is chin checking rappers (including Kanye), for having kids without the benefit of clergy. People don’t give a tiny tin fuck about policing the sex lives of anyone but black women.

freshmouthgoddess

and the POC and the black folks who are mocking black women because we want to protect twerking from whiteness. I want to thank you for being good little agents to white supremacy. thank you for reafirming what i know.. Black women only have themsleves. black women must protect themsleves from all of you at all cost. thank you. for showing support for whiteness. may whiteness bring you long and fruitful lives. (unless they decide to kill you first)

thegoddamazon:

cosmicyoruba:

freshmouthgoddess:

I will say this once qgain. if you are not here to elevate all black women. please fucking unfollow.

Fucking cosigned!

Co-signed.

Unfollow me if you ain’t here for Black women. And I mean ALL Black women. Just unfollow now because we gon fight.

(via masteradept)

The reason why so many black women/girls/ladies love Moesha is because we had black sitcoms before. Some were family sitcoms and some were friend sitcoms. Moesha was about a black girl who was beautiful, had her own goals, aspirations, and fears, and was flawed. She was the center of this show. All these hott boys wanted to get with her and you even had the losers who did her bogus. She was around poverty and struggle but was also around successful black people. She had those braids too. Those Braids. Those braids meant so much to me. It’s so easy to find a teen show and list off white protagonist after white protagonist. Felicity. The OC. Everwood. One Tree Hill. Daria. 90210. Dawsons Creek.Gossip Girl. I’m not saying they were bad and I’m not saying some of them didn’t have POC. But Moesha will mean more to me and other Black Girls/Women than anyone who isn’t a black female will ever know. It showed me and others that we could matter. I will forever love and support Brandy for that. Don’t even get me started on R&H Cinderella.

-my cousin during a facebook conversation about shows we watched in the 90’s. 

She gave me permission to post this. 

(via supportivecoloredfriendboo)

(via notesonascandal)

stoicallyemotive

(via masteradept)

Mary McLeod Bethune’s ‘Last Will and Testament’

deluxvivens:

image

(because I’m tired of Black women’s history being ignored in these conversations)

Sometimes as I sit communing in my study I feel that death is not far off. I am aware that it will overtake me before the greatest of my dreams – full equality for the Negro in our time – is realized. Yet, I face that reality without fear or regrets. I am resigned to death as all humans must be at the proper time. Death neither alarms nor frightens one who has had a long career of fruitful toil. The knowledge that my work has been helpful to many fills me with joy and great satisfaction.

Since my retirement from an active role in educational work and from the affairs of the National Council of Negro Women, I have been living quietly and working at my desk at my home here in Florida. The years have directed a change of pace for me. I am now 78 years old and my activities are no longer so strenuous as they once were. I feel that I must conserve my strength to finish the work at hand.

Already I have begun working on my autobiography which will record my life-journey in detail, together with the innumerable side trips which have carried me abroad, into every corner of our country, into homes both lowly and luxurious, and even into the White House to confer with Presidents. I have also deeded my home and its contents to the Mary McLeod Bethune Foundation, organized in March, 1953, for research, interracial activity and the sponsorship of wider educational opportunities.

Sometimes I ask myself if I have any other legacy to leave. Truly, my worldly possessions are few.  Yet, my experiences have been rich. From them, I have distilled principles and policies in which I believe firmly, for they represent the meaning of my life’s work. They are the products of much sweat and sorrow.

Perhaps in them there is something of value. So, as my life draws to a close, I will pass them on to Negroes everywhere in the hope that an old woman’s philosophy may give them inspiration. Here, then is my legacy.


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