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bylinebeat:

Byline Beat’s Shanley Knox Sits Down With Evelyn Namara

In today’s interview Shanley Knox of Byline Beat discusses the growing effects of information communication technologies in Africa with Evelyn Namara. The two discuss Evelyn’s recent trip to the United States, mobile apps improving day to day lives in Africa and the community that it has helped cultivate.

Shanley Knox’s five piece series on ‘How Communication and Technology are Changing the Faces of Africa’ can be found on Byline Beat and you can also find her on Twitter at @ShanleyKnox.

Special thanks to Evelyn Namara who can be found online at http://EvelynNamara.com and on Twitter at @enamara.
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(via wildunicornherd)

sisterwolf

Queen Ranavalona III of Madagascar, ca. 1890-1895 
Ranavalona III (November 22, 1861 – May 23, 1917) was the last sovereign of the Kingdom of Madagascar.
She ruled from July 30, 1883, to February 28, 1897, in a reign marked by ongoing and ultimately futile efforts to resist the colonial designs of the government of France. As a young woman, she was selected from among several Andriana (nobles) qualified to succeed Queen Ranavalona II upon her death.
Like both preceding queens, Ranavalona entered into a political marriage with a member of the Hova (freeman) elite named Rainilaiarivony who, in his role as Prime Minister of Madagascar, largely oversaw the day-to-day governance of the kingdom and managed its foreign affairs.
Throughout her reign, Ranavalona tried to stave off colonization by strengthening trade and diplomatic relations with the United States and Great Britain. However, French attacks on coastal port towns and an assault on the capital city of Antananarivo ultimately led to the capture of the royal palace in 1895, ending the sovereignty and political autonomy of the century-old kingdom.
The newly installed French colonial government promptly exiled Rainilaiarivony to Algiers, while Ranavalona and her court were initially permitted to remain as symbolic figureheads. However, the outbreak of a popular resistance movement, called the menalamba rebellion, and discovery of anti-French political intrigues at court led the French to exile the queen to the island of Réunion in 1897.
Rainilaiarivony died that same year and shortly thereafter Ranavalona was relocated to a villa in Algiers, along with several members of her family. The queen, her family and the servants accompanying her were provided an allowance and enjoyed a comfortable standard of living including occasional trips to Paris for shopping and sightseeing. Despite Ranavalona’s repeated requests, she was never permitted to return home to Madagascar. Ranavalona died of an embolism at her villa in Algiers in 1917 at the age of 55. Her remains were buried in Algiers but were disinterred 21 years later and shipped to Madagascar, where they were placed within the tomb of Queen Rasoherina on the grounds of the Rova of Antananarivo.
(text source | image via sisterwolf)

Queen Ranavalona III of Madagascar, ca. 1890-1895 

Ranavalona III (November 22, 1861 – May 23, 1917) was the last sovereign of the Kingdom of Madagascar.

She ruled from July 30, 1883, to February 28, 1897, in a reign marked by ongoing and ultimately futile efforts to resist the colonial designs of the government of France. As a young woman, she was selected from among several Andriana (nobles) qualified to succeed Queen Ranavalona II upon her death.

Like both preceding queens, Ranavalona entered into a political marriage with a member of the Hova (freeman) elite named Rainilaiarivony who, in his role as Prime Minister of Madagascar, largely oversaw the day-to-day governance of the kingdom and managed its foreign affairs.

Throughout her reign, Ranavalona tried to stave off colonization by strengthening trade and diplomatic relations with the United States and Great Britain. However, French attacks on coastal port towns and an assault on the capital city of Antananarivo ultimately led to the capture of the royal palace in 1895, ending the sovereignty and political autonomy of the century-old kingdom.

The newly installed French colonial government promptly exiled Rainilaiarivony to Algiers, while Ranavalona and her court were initially permitted to remain as symbolic figureheads. However, the outbreak of a popular resistance movement, called the menalamba rebellion, and discovery of anti-French political intrigues at court led the French to exile the queen to the island of Réunion in 1897.

Rainilaiarivony died that same year and shortly thereafter Ranavalona was relocated to a villa in Algiers, along with several members of her family. The queen, her family and the servants accompanying her were provided an allowance and enjoyed a comfortable standard of living including occasional trips to Paris for shopping and sightseeing. Despite Ranavalona’s repeated requests, she was never permitted to return home to Madagascar. Ranavalona died of an embolism at her villa in Algiers in 1917 at the age of 55. Her remains were buried in Algiers but were disinterred 21 years later and shipped to Madagascar, where they were placed within the tomb of Queen Rasoherina on the grounds of the Rova of Antananarivo.

(text source | image via sisterwolf)

(via crankyskirt)

Kenyan men urged to boycott meals in abuse protest

dynamicafrica:

A Kenyan men’s lobby group calls for a six-day boycott of home-cooked meals to draw attention to what it says is increasing domestic violence against men.

The organisation, Maendeleo Ya Wanaume, wants Kenyan men to stop eating meals cooked at home by wives and partners.

It says men should instead eat together outside the home, and share experiences of emotional and physical abuse.

Kenya’s government does not take domestic violence against men seriously and may be fuelling it, the group says.

Maendeleo Ya Wanaume’s leader Ndiritu Njoka told the BBC’s Network Africa programme that he called for the nationwide boycott to try to stop women beating up or emotionally abusing their husbands and spouses.

Correspondents say most meals in Kenyan homes are cooked by women - and culturally it is important for men to eat at home in order to show their appreciation for women.

Maendeleo Ya Wanaume - which means Development for Men - was set up to try to encourage men to speak out in a society that often ridicules as weak, men who are subjected to domestic violence.

The group says the problem is growing as Kenyan women become more economically independent - in part, it says, because of government initiatives to improve the status of women.

Last year, the group conducted its own survey of Central and Nairobi provinces and found that up to 460,000 men said they had been subjected to some sort of domestic abuse.

These figures have not been independently confirmed.

The two provinces have a combined population of more than seven million people.

I'm Not Listening: Kenyan Whiteness by Gukira

fyeahafrica:

Kenyan whiteness is righteous rightness. Hyper-corrective toward non-whites, hyper-aware of its privileged status, hyper-willing to exercise its privilege and whip the natives into place.

A blustering white man yelled obscenities at my cab guy. When I subsequently confronted the blusterer—it’s that kind of day—he insisted: “he broke the law,” and repeated several times, “I’m not listening.” This in the banking hall of the Barclays Premier at Westgate—I don’t bank there, but I followed him inside to stage this confrontation.

“I’m not listening.”

It’s a curiously infantile statement coming from a middle-aged man—I place him in his mid-to-late 50s. Given this morning’s post on listening, I was struck by the phrase.

Q.E.D.

I try not to write when I am upset—irritation is a different thing. And, certainly, I try not to write when I am shaking with rage—at a whiteness that non-white Kenyans have allowed, even encouraged, to flourish; at a whiteness that need never question its rightness; at a whiteness that believes it is appropriate to belittle and demean non-white Kenyans, acting as though it need not take responsibility for its actions.

“I am not listening.”

What is it to insist on not listening as a foundation for Kenyan whiteness? How does Kenyan whiteness become a practice of not listening to non-whites? How might it be understood as an insistence on not listening?

Foundation. Practice. Insistence.

It is, perhaps, too simple to say that Kenya remains deeply segregated—class provides some opportunities for interaction, but not enough to matter. An inherited colonial whiteness has been buttressed by a multi-national and NGO whiteness. I use the singular, perhaps wrongly, to suggest that whiteness has clustered or, to use a metaphor I adore, agglutinated into a one-ness anchored by its relationship to non-whiteness.

Colonial Kenyan descendants, Europeans, North Americans, and Southern Africans clump together into something insular that can be incredibly ugly.

I am angry. Consequently, I am overstating my case. I know this. Yet, the case I am making about contemporary Kenyan whiteness is rarely made in public because money is at stake; rarely made consistently, allowing Kenyan newspapers to continue publishing racist screeds about “African inferiority”; rarely made into a cause for action because, again, money is at stake.

The too-swift overlapping transitions from majority white colonial governance to majority white tourism to majority white multi-national and NGO administrators have consolidated into something that cannot be critiqued. Something that simply does not listen.

Words may have replaced whips and, with the exception of Delamere’s descendants, whites in Kenya no longer shoot non-white Kenyans for sport. But it feels as though a whole bunch of white folk are running around, pointing guns at non-whites, and screaming, “BANG, BANG! You’re DEAD!”

(via deliciouskaek)

fyeahafrica:

Tales of success from Dadaab, world’s biggest refugee camp
Dadaab refugee camp in north-eastern Kenya was set up in 1991 as a temporary solution to conflict in the Horn of Africa. Twenty years later its numbers are still growing and for many of the camp’s younger residents it is the only home they have known.
The camp was built to house 90,000 refugees but its population is now broaching half a million people and with drought and famine ravaging East Africa, more arrive each day. Despite the desperation some residents are battling the odds, determined to make a success of life as a refugee.
[read on]

fyeahafrica:

Tales of success from Dadaab, world’s biggest refugee camp

Dadaab refugee camp in north-eastern Kenya was set up in 1991 as a temporary solution to conflict in the Horn of Africa. Twenty years later its numbers are still growing and for many of the camp’s younger residents it is the only home they have known.

The camp was built to house 90,000 refugees but its population is now broaching half a million people and with drought and famine ravaging East Africa, more arrive each day. Despite the desperation some residents are battling the odds, determined to make a success of life as a refugee.

[read on]

mainroute
mainroute:

Lamu girl - Kenya by Eric Lafforgue on Flickr.

mainroute:

Lamu girl - Kenya by Eric Lafforgue on Flickr.

(via )

fyeahafrica:

THE RAPE OF THE SAMBURU WOMEN

For more than fifty years, England has maintained military training facilities in the Samburu region of its former colony, Kenya.

During this period, women in the area have faced an epidemic of rape. Women from the Samburu, Massai, Rendile and Turkana indigenous communities have filed more than 600 official rape claims against British soldiers.

Yet, despite documentation of their claims, a three-year internal investigation by the Royal Military Police (RMP) cleared all soldiers of wrongdoing.Meanwhile, the victims have been shamed and outcast in their communities, many to the point of exile.

In the mid-1990s, Beatrice Chili responded to this situation by establishing the village of Senchen, a self-sufficient community run entirely by women. There, women build homes, weave textiles, gather and grow food, and raise children. This short film visits the brave women of Senchen, who speak candidly about their suffering and talk passionately about their demands for justice.

Watch the film to hear their stories and to find out how you can offer your support.

via

umalik
SomaliaSomaliaSomalia

umalik:

These pictures are not part of an archive, they are as recent as just few weeks and are from Somalia. People in Somalia are experiencing one of the worst famine of their history and have things compounded thanks to not having a central Government since 1991. This beautiful land, with rich history and culture is today in need of everything we can offer. 

On this Eid ul Fitr when we Muslims around the world have finished a whole month of fasting, depriving ourselves from everyday pleasures to feel the suffering and pain - these are the people we should be able to connect more closely with. So today and tomorrow when you celebrate around the world the festivities - all I ask you is to remember those in need in East Africa.

My appeal is beyond religion as this is a Humanitarian crisis.

It will not take a lot from you to help. Please generously donate online through a Charity, motivate more people to contribute or even reblog and talk about this with people around you.

For a video report of situation from Al Jazeera: Aid groups in Somalia appeal for more funding.

Charities involved in East Africa and Somalia famine response:

1. Islamic Relief
2. UNICEF
3. Oxfam
4. Disaster Emergency Committee
5. Catholic Relief Services

Eid Mubarak!

(via masteradept)