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Esoterica

dis-pos-a-ble
infinitefaults:

Marchesa, spring 2013

infinitefaults:

Marchesa, spring 2013

(via alltruthwaitsinallthings-deacti)

hvk.org

Even the clothes they wore were torture!

hamburgerjack:

howtobenoladarling:

image

Brooks Brothers you know the high end suit retailer, yea they got their start selling slave clothing to various slave traders. 

image

Historians say that slavery was so central to the economy in the early days of America that almost every business benefited from it.The entire economy of this country was based on slavery, North as well as South,” said Eric Foner, a professor of history at Columbia University. “New York had a stranglehold on the cotton trade, which made up half the total value of U.S. exports in 1850. Brooks Brothers supplied a lot of clothing to plantation owners. Merchants, manufacturers, everyone felt the economic ripples.”

Mr. Weld has shown by abundant and unimpeachable testimony, that “the clothing of slaves by day, and their covering by night, is not adequate either for comfort or decency.” (p. 40, &c.)

Virginia: Hon. T. T. Bouldin, a slaveholder, in a speech in Congress, Feb. 16, 1835, said: “He knew that many negroes had died from exposure to weather,” and added, “They are clad in a flimsy fabric that will turn neither wind nor water.”

Maryland: “The slaves, naked and starved, often fall victims to the inclemencies of the weather.” (Geo. Buchanan, M. D., of Baltimore, 1791.)

Georgia, &c.: “We rode through many rice swamps, where the blacks were very numerous”—“working up to the middle in water, men and women nearly naked.” (Wm. Savery, of Philadelphia, Minister Friends’ Soc., 1791.)

Tennessee, &c.: “In every slaveholding State many slaves suffer extremely, both while they labor and when they sleep, for want of clothing to keep them warm.” (Rev. John Rankin.)

http://ugrrquilt.hartcottagequilts.com/rr5.htm

Frederick Douglass mentions in his memoirs that as a slave child, he didn’t even have anything to wear until about seven and even then, I think he said it was just a big shirt.

(via witchsistah)

neoqlassical

(via angelsscream)

citizins
queennubian:

citizins:

ALL ITEMS FOR SALE AND FOR ORDER VIA WWW.CITIZINS.BIGCARTEL.COM OR EMAIL CITIZINS@GMAIL.COM

queennubian:

citizins:

ALL ITEMS FOR SALE AND FOR ORDER VIA WWW.CITIZINS.BIGCARTEL.COM OR EMAIL CITIZINS@GMAIL.COM

image

(via angelsscream)

weformlikevoltron

bblackkblobb:

westindians:

weformlikevoltron:

Lol at fashion bloggers who complain about the exclusivity of high end designer brands being in jeopardy because of rappers, collaborations etc. aka we don’t want black people in the hood to get it. Yet your pretending to like rap by posting Camron tunes and old three six mafia joints

tumblr is real tonight

i just read an ask about someone complaining about ‘ghettofication’

like wtf

(via blueklectic)

vintagegal

vintagegal:

1950’s Vintage Cocktail Dresses

(via hamburgerjack-deactivated201404)

velocicrafter:

darkjez:

thedarkchocolatedandy:

super-eklectic1:

supersiku:

howtobeterrell:

That’s a big ass scarf lol

I want it

take the scarf and the man, be warm all winter

That shit does look cozy though…

Ya’ll need to get real.
That’s a blanket.
Nigga might as well be walkin around in a Snuggie…

okay for real I think that’s just the throw from his couch though.

I have that blanket. I mean, it’s really soft & I love to snuggle up in it when the weather’s cold, but…that’s a blanket big enough to fit me & a kid.

velocicrafter:

darkjez:

thedarkchocolatedandy:

super-eklectic1:

supersiku:

howtobeterrell:

That’s a big ass scarf lol

I want it

take the scarf and the man, be warm all winter

That shit does look cozy though…

Ya’ll need to get real.

That’s a blanket.

Nigga might as well be walkin around in a Snuggie…

okay for real I think that’s just the throw from his couch though.

I have that blanket. I mean, it’s really soft & I love to snuggle up in it when the weather’s cold, but…that’s a blanket big enough to fit me & a kid.

(via spookyfluffaloforbossofmybutt)

micropolisnyc
thegoddamazon:

deliciouskaek:

niggaswithankhs:

cynique:

pussyharvest:

micropolisnyc:

Why aren’t there more minority models in the pages of fashion magazines?
The answers are often disturbing, and speak to a form of racial bigotry found in the fashion centers of New York and London — as well as a deep-rooted aesthetic that equates prestige and elitism with stereotypical whiteness (and thin-ness).
Here are a few highly-revealing quotes from fashion industry employees, from an analysis of the industry by Ashley Mears, a sociologist and former model. Her article is called “Size zero high-end ethnic: Cultural production and the reproduction of culture in fashion modeling,” and was published in 2009. Mears kept the identities of her sources private.
“A lot of black girls have got very wide noses… The rest of her face is flat, therefore, in a flat image, your nose, it broadens in a photograph. It’s already wide, it looks humongous in the photograph. I think that’s, there’s an element of that, a lot of very beautiful black girls are moved out by their noses, some of them.” —H, London Agency Director
“But it’s also really hard to scout a good black girl. Because they have to have the right nose and the right bottom. Most black girls have wide noses and big bottoms so if you can find that right body and that right face, but it’s hard.” —A, NYC Agency Scout
“Okay let’s say Prada. You don’t have a huge amount of black people buying Prada. They can’t afford it. Okay so that’s economics there. So why put a black face? They put a white face, because those are the ones that buy the clothes.” —L, NYC Stylist
“We don’t like using the same model too often, but it’s harder to find ethnic girls. And…well, I don’t want to sound racist, but— well for Asians, it’s hard to find tall girls that will fit the clothes because most of them are very petit. For black girls, I guess—black girls have a harder edge kind of look, like if I’m shooting something really edgy, I’ll use a black girl, it always just depends on the clothes.” —A, NYC Magazine Editor
“Me personally, in my opinion, there really is no good, good, black girl around. The really good, good black girl around are still the same, and are still the one that everybody wants… It’s very difficult to find one. The agency don’t deliver enough choice to make happy the client [sic].” —O, NYC Casting Director

oh.

is anyone rly surprised tho?

omg but i definitely made a post about this……..
……………….when POC talk about it it’s just we crazy as shit

“a form of racial bigotry”
nope. just say it.
R A C I S M
racism

Here’s what I got:
“Black girls do not look like white girls with dark skin so we don’t hire them.”
It’s racism plain and simple. They want Black girls who basically look like white girls dipped in Nutella.
If your features and body aren’t Eurocentric, then you’re out of the job. It’s a wonder how Chanel Iman has managed to stay in work this long because she definitely has a Black girl face…but she’s light-skinned, mixed (thus having “good hair”), and thinner than most of her white counterparts therefore she’s got “Saving Graces” in the fashion industry.
But for the dark skinned Black girls with “Black features”? Shit out of luck.
It’s one of the reasons I don’t bother following the fashion industry.
Also, that comment about Black people not being the primary consumers is a lie and half.
Almost every Black entertainer buys only luxury goods, and even PROMOTES those goods in their work (look at every rapper for the last twenty years..all they ever talk about are fashion items).
And to say we can’t afford it is also a lie. Most of what Prada makes is plain and ugly shit that I’d expect Queen Elizabeth to wear; same goes for Chanel. They don’t cater to a young demographic. They cater to older, wealthier white women, and are thus, boring to most.
Your runways are boring, play shitty music, and all your models look like the same weird, wide-spaced eyed alien drones that y’all like to hire because fuck POC, right?
You’re paying for the name and the quality, not the style itself. You can easily recreate those styles shopping at Bebe, Forever 21, and even fuckass Wet Seal.
And let’s talk about how China is the NUMBER ONE CONSUMER of luxury goods on the planet but all the models on the runway are still white as fuck. So…how do you explain that?

thegoddamazon:

deliciouskaek:

niggaswithankhs:

cynique:

pussyharvest:

micropolisnyc:

Why aren’t there more minority models in the pages of fashion magazines?

The answers are often disturbing, and speak to a form of racial bigotry found in the fashion centers of New York and London — as well as a deep-rooted aesthetic that equates prestige and elitism with stereotypical whiteness (and thin-ness).

Here are a few highly-revealing quotes from fashion industry employees, from an analysis of the industry by Ashley Mears, a sociologist and former model. Her article is called “Size zero high-end ethnic: Cultural production and the reproduction of culture in fashion modeling,” and was published in 2009. Mears kept the identities of her sources private.

A lot of black girls have got very wide noses… The rest of her face is flat, therefore, in a flat image, your nose, it broadens in a photograph. It’s already wide, it looks humongous in the photograph. I think that’s, there’s an element of that, a lot of very beautiful black girls are moved out by their noses, some of them.” —H, London Agency Director

“But it’s also really hard to scout a good black girl. Because they have to have the right nose and the right bottom. Most black girls have wide noses and big bottoms so if you can find that right body and that right face, but it’s hard.” —A, NYC Agency Scout

“Okay let’s say Prada. You don’t have a huge amount of black people buying Prada. They can’t afford it. Okay so that’s economics there. So why put a black face? They put a white face, because those are the ones that buy the clothes.” —L, NYC Stylist

“We don’t like using the same model too often, but it’s harder to find ethnic girls. And…well, I don’t want to sound racist, but— well for Asians, it’s hard to find tall girls that will fit the clothes because most of them are very petit. For black girls, I guess—black girls have a harder edge kind of look, like if I’m shooting something really edgy, I’ll use a black girl, it always just depends on the clothes.” —A, NYC Magazine Editor

Me personally, in my opinion, there really is no good, good, black girl around. The really good, good black girl around are still the same, and are still the one that everybody wants… It’s very difficult to find one. The agency don’t deliver enough choice to make happy the client [sic].” —O, NYC Casting Director

oh.

is anyone rly surprised tho?

omg but i definitely made a post about this……..

……………….when POC talk about it it’s just we crazy as shit

“a form of racial bigotry”

nope. just say it.

R A C I S M

racism

Here’s what I got:

“Black girls do not look like white girls with dark skin so we don’t hire them.”

It’s racism plain and simple. They want Black girls who basically look like white girls dipped in Nutella.

If your features and body aren’t Eurocentric, then you’re out of the job. It’s a wonder how Chanel Iman has managed to stay in work this long because she definitely has a Black girl face…but she’s light-skinned, mixed (thus having “good hair”), and thinner than most of her white counterparts therefore she’s got “Saving Graces” in the fashion industry.

But for the dark skinned Black girls with “Black features”? Shit out of luck.

It’s one of the reasons I don’t bother following the fashion industry.

Also, that comment about Black people not being the primary consumers is a lie and half.

Almost every Black entertainer buys only luxury goods, and even PROMOTES those goods in their work (look at every rapper for the last twenty years..all they ever talk about are fashion items).

And to say we can’t afford it is also a lie. Most of what Prada makes is plain and ugly shit that I’d expect Queen Elizabeth to wear; same goes for Chanel. They don’t cater to a young demographic. They cater to older, wealthier white women, and are thus, boring to most.

Your runways are boring, play shitty music, and all your models look like the same weird, wide-spaced eyed alien drones that y’all like to hire because fuck POC, right?

You’re paying for the name and the quality, not the style itself. You can easily recreate those styles shopping at Bebe, Forever 21, and even fuckass Wet Seal.

And let’s talk about how China is the NUMBER ONE CONSUMER of luxury goods on the planet but all the models on the runway are still white as fuck. So…how do you explain that?

(via the-goddamazon)

micropolisnyc
deliciouskaek:

niggaswithankhs:

cynique:

pussyharvest:

micropolisnyc:

Why aren’t there more minority models in the pages of fashion magazines?
The answers are often disturbing, and speak to a form of racial bigotry found in the fashion centers of New York and London — as well as a deep-rooted aesthetic that equates prestige and elitism with stereotypical whiteness (and thin-ness).
Here are a few highly-revealing quotes from fashion industry employees, from an analysis of the industry by Ashley Mears, a sociologist and former model. Her article is called “Size zero high-end ethnic: Cultural production and the reproduction of culture in fashion modeling,” and was published in 2009. Mears kept the identities of her sources private.
“A lot of black girls have got very wide noses… The rest of her face is flat, therefore, in a flat image, your nose, it broadens in a photograph. It’s already wide, it looks humongous in the photograph. I think that’s, there’s an element of that, a lot of very beautiful black girls are moved out by their noses, some of them.” —H, London Agency Director
“But it’s also really hard to scout a good black girl. Because they have to have the right nose and the right bottom. Most black girls have wide noses and big bottoms so if you can find that right body and that right face, but it’s hard.” —A, NYC Agency Scout
“Okay let’s say Prada. You don’t have a huge amount of black people buying Prada. They can’t afford it. Okay so that’s economics there. So why put a black face? They put a white face, because those are the ones that buy the clothes.” —L, NYC Stylist
“We don’t like using the same model too often, but it’s harder to find ethnic girls. And…well, I don’t want to sound racist, but— well for Asians, it’s hard to find tall girls that will fit the clothes because most of them are very petit. For black girls, I guess—black girls have a harder edge kind of look, like if I’m shooting something really edgy, I’ll use a black girl, it always just depends on the clothes.” —A, NYC Magazine Editor
“Me personally, in my opinion, there really is no good, good, black girl around. The really good, good black girl around are still the same, and are still the one that everybody wants… It’s very difficult to find one. The agency don’t deliver enough choice to make happy the client [sic].” —O, NYC Casting Director

oh.

is anyone rly surprised tho?

omg but i definitely made a post about this……..
……………….when POC talk about it it’s just we crazy as shit


“a form of racial bigotry”
nope. just say it. 
R A C I S M
racism

deliciouskaek:

niggaswithankhs:

cynique:

pussyharvest:

micropolisnyc:

Why aren’t there more minority models in the pages of fashion magazines?

The answers are often disturbing, and speak to a form of racial bigotry found in the fashion centers of New York and London — as well as a deep-rooted aesthetic that equates prestige and elitism with stereotypical whiteness (and thin-ness).

Here are a few highly-revealing quotes from fashion industry employees, from an analysis of the industry by Ashley Mears, a sociologist and former model. Her article is called “Size zero high-end ethnic: Cultural production and the reproduction of culture in fashion modeling,” and was published in 2009. Mears kept the identities of her sources private.

A lot of black girls have got very wide noses… The rest of her face is flat, therefore, in a flat image, your nose, it broadens in a photograph. It’s already wide, it looks humongous in the photograph. I think that’s, there’s an element of that, a lot of very beautiful black girls are moved out by their noses, some of them.” —H, London Agency Director

“But it’s also really hard to scout a good black girl. Because they have to have the right nose and the right bottom. Most black girls have wide noses and big bottoms so if you can find that right body and that right face, but it’s hard.” —A, NYC Agency Scout

“Okay let’s say Prada. You don’t have a huge amount of black people buying Prada. They can’t afford it. Okay so that’s economics there. So why put a black face? They put a white face, because those are the ones that buy the clothes.” —L, NYC Stylist

“We don’t like using the same model too often, but it’s harder to find ethnic girls. And…well, I don’t want to sound racist, but— well for Asians, it’s hard to find tall girls that will fit the clothes because most of them are very petit. For black girls, I guess—black girls have a harder edge kind of look, like if I’m shooting something really edgy, I’ll use a black girl, it always just depends on the clothes.” —A, NYC Magazine Editor

Me personally, in my opinion, there really is no good, good, black girl around. The really good, good black girl around are still the same, and are still the one that everybody wants… It’s very difficult to find one. The agency don’t deliver enough choice to make happy the client [sic].” —O, NYC Casting Director

oh.

is anyone rly surprised tho?

omg but i definitely made a post about this……..

……………….when POC talk about it it’s just we crazy as shit

“a form of racial bigotry”

nope. just say it.

R A C I S M

racism

(via deliciouskaek)

vintageblackglamour
thestoutorialist:

vintageblackglamour:

Josephine Baker surrounded by admirers at the Olympia theater in Paris in the 1940s surrounded by admirers. Her husband, Jo Bouillon and the French singer and actor, Georges Guetary are at her side. Photo: Maurice Zalewski, Gamma-Rapho/Getty.

Holy shit that hair piece situation

thestoutorialist:

vintageblackglamour:

Josephine Baker surrounded by admirers at the Olympia theater in Paris in the 1940s surrounded by admirers. Her husband, Jo Bouillon and the French singer and actor, Georges Guetary are at her side. Photo: Maurice Zalewski, Gamma-Rapho/Getty.

Holy shit that hair piece situation