masteradept
ladymargo:

thecivilwarparlor:

Rare Photograph Reveals Details about pre-Civil War Slave in Baltimore
Martha Ann “Patty” Atavis holds Alice Lee Whitridge, one of the children in her care. The Maryland Historical Society recently acquired the rare photograph and documents that shed light on Atavis’ life as a pre-Civil War domestic slave in Baltimore. Historians plan to use the new information to learn more about urban slavery in Baltimore and around the country. 
“Daguerreotypes of slaves by themselves are incredibly rare, let alone ones that have information as to the sitter. The auction package w/photo included documentation about Atavis, including an 1839 bill of sale that identified Atavis as a “slave for life.” Her previous owner, Ruth McCubbin, sold Atavis to Whitridge for $200. Atavis was about 23 years old when she was sold. 
The images and documentation are currently on display at the Maryland Historical Society. For more information, please call the Historical Society at 410-685-3750 orhttp://www.mdhs.org/.

The look on her face.
I mean, both of them.

ladymargo:

thecivilwarparlor:

Rare Photograph Reveals Details about pre-Civil War Slave in Baltimore

Martha Ann “Patty” Atavis holds Alice Lee Whitridge, one of the children in her care. The Maryland Historical Society recently acquired the rare photograph and documents that shed light on Atavis’ life as a pre-Civil War domestic slave in Baltimore. Historians plan to use the new information to learn more about urban slavery in Baltimore and around the country. 

“Daguerreotypes of slaves by themselves are incredibly rare, let alone ones that have information as to the sitter. The auction package w/photo included documentation about Atavis, including an 1839 bill of sale that identified Atavis as a “slave for life.” Her previous owner, Ruth McCubbin, sold Atavis to Whitridge for $200. Atavis was about 23 years old when she was sold. 

The images and documentation are currently on display at the Maryland Historical Society. For more information, please call the Historical Society at 410-685-3750 orhttp://www.mdhs.org/.

The look on her face.

I mean, both of them.

masteradept

Beginning in March, a black woman will be at the helm of a major fire department for the first time in U.S. history. Theresa Deloach-Reed, 52, was named chief of the Oakland city fire department. Reed has been fighting fires for nearly 30 years, has seen many changes on the job and calls her appointment “exciting.”

With less that four percent of firefighters female and nearly 6 percent black, Reed says that the key to changing those figures is recruitment. She said, “Women in the fire department have to go out and tell other women it’s a great profession, because there is still this stereotype that women are not firefighters.”

dammitcaleb-deactivated20130328
velocicrafter:

razycrandomgirl:

asianhistory:

twistedasphyxia:

gunnyoshiaki:

Some sort of scientists believe that if the Library of Alexandria didn’t burn down or the Dark Ages never happened, we would be 300 years advanced in technology. :>

This is depressing. l:

 This isn’t something I would normally reblog on FyeahAsianHistory except this is why this blog exists. This is EXACTLY why this blog exists. Let’s put this in perspective of the very limited knowledge I have on both the Western European Middle Ages/Medieval Period/ quote “Dark Ages”, and Egypt in this time period plus everything I know about Asia as a whole.
This? This is bullshit. There’s no nice way to say it. Was the Library of Alexandria a huge, devastating loss? Absolutely. But it was “lost” more than once, and it was certainly burned before Christianity at least once and there was more than one branch of the library. Take a quick look: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Library_of_Alexandria there are sources saying Muslims destroyed it, and sources saying Christians ordered to have the “temple” burned down.
So on that account, it’s a load of crap. On other accounts: As any Medievalist will fervently tell you, the “Dark Ages” is a very misleading term. Loads of cool things happened during the Middle Ages in Europe. But look at Asia. Look at say, Islam which collected new libraries, brought back those “lost” Greek and Roman works, started Universities, invented the astrolabe. Look at the Silk road towards the beginning, and hell, even onwards. WHAT ABOUT THE GREAT WALL OF CHINA. India’s Chola Dynasty Maritime power. How about China’s first standing navy with “junk” ships? What about moveable type printing invented by the Chinese? Gunpowder warfare? How about a freakin’ odometer? WHAT ABOUT COFFEE? Hospitals? Female Surgeons.
Try looking up “Islamic Golden Age.” Really, just try it.
What was the “Dark Ages” for Europe (which is highly debateable) was the Golden Ages of Islam, the end of the Classical Age in Japan, and a period of awesome invention, innovation, and exploration for China and through several dynasties to boot. Say, there’s a funny little thing called “Pax Mongolica” and it lead to a lot of good things.
Listen, Europe and Christianity may have dun goofed a little, and some of the consequences will never be the same, but while they were on a bit of a downer, the OTHER HALF OF THE EURASIAN CONTINENT WAS DOING PRETTY OKAY. Really.
I run this blog because I want people to know that The West, Christianity, and Europe are not solely responsible for the successes or failures of the human race and innovation. Because I want people to know that before the Bible, there was Gilgamesh. That in the 11th century, a Japanese woman composed the world’s first novel. That people in the Islamic world translated the texts we consider so important in the Western Canon of Greek and Roman literature today. That India, Japan, China, and much of the Islamic empire all had golden/classical periods occuring during this time period. China became the first country in the world to use paper money in their banks.
Listen guys, if I want you to take away one thing, it’s that just because Europe sleeps doesn’t mean the world doesn’t make leaps and bounds. 

And now I follow a new blog! :D

pretty much the commentary from Asian History, especially the bolded part.
I’d be curious what was happening in the Americas during that time period.

velocicrafter:

razycrandomgirl:

asianhistory:

twistedasphyxia:

gunnyoshiaki:

Some sort of scientists believe that if the Library of Alexandria didn’t burn down or the Dark Ages never happened, we would be 300 years advanced in technology. :>

This is depressing. l:

 This isn’t something I would normally reblog on FyeahAsianHistory except this is why this blog exists. This is EXACTLY why this blog exists. Let’s put this in perspective of the very limited knowledge I have on both the Western European Middle Ages/Medieval Period/ quote “Dark Ages”, and Egypt in this time period plus everything I know about Asia as a whole.

This? This is bullshit. There’s no nice way to say it. Was the Library of Alexandria a huge, devastating loss? Absolutely. But it was “lost” more than once, and it was certainly burned before Christianity at least once and there was more than one branch of the library. Take a quick look: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Library_of_Alexandria there are sources saying Muslims destroyed it, and sources saying Christians ordered to have the “temple” burned down.

So on that account, it’s a load of crap. On other accounts: As any Medievalist will fervently tell you, the “Dark Ages” is a very misleading term. Loads of cool things happened during the Middle Ages in Europe. But look at Asia. Look at say, Islam which collected new libraries, brought back those “lost” Greek and Roman works, started Universities, invented the astrolabe. Look at the Silk road towards the beginning, and hell, even onwards. WHAT ABOUT THE GREAT WALL OF CHINA. India’s Chola Dynasty Maritime power. How about China’s first standing navy with “junk” ships? What about moveable type printing invented by the Chinese? Gunpowder warfare? How about a freakin’ odometer? WHAT ABOUT COFFEE? Hospitals? Female Surgeons.

Try looking up “Islamic Golden Age.” Really, just try it.

What was the “Dark Ages” for Europe (which is highly debateable) was the Golden Ages of Islam, the end of the Classical Age in Japan, and a period of awesome invention, innovation, and exploration for China and through several dynasties to boot. Say, there’s a funny little thing called “Pax Mongolica” and it lead to a lot of good things.

Listen, Europe and Christianity may have dun goofed a little, and some of the consequences will never be the same, but while they were on a bit of a downer, the OTHER HALF OF THE EURASIAN CONTINENT WAS DOING PRETTY OKAY. Really.

I run this blog because I want people to know that The West, Christianity, and Europe are not solely responsible for the successes or failures of the human race and innovation. Because I want people to know that before the Bible, there was Gilgamesh. That in the 11th century, a Japanese woman composed the world’s first novel. That people in the Islamic world translated the texts we consider so important in the Western Canon of Greek and Roman literature today. That India, Japan, China, and much of the Islamic empire all had golden/classical periods occuring during this time period. China became the first country in the world to use paper money in their banks.

Listen guys, if I want you to take away one thing, it’s that just because Europe sleeps doesn’t mean the world doesn’t make leaps and bounds.

And now I follow a new blog! :D

pretty much the commentary from Asian History, especially the bolded part.

I’d be curious what was happening in the Americas during that time period.

witchymerqueer
Black women across the country spoke out against similar abuses [to those experienced by black people, and black women in particular, on buses in the segregated South]. Besides the [Women’s Political Council], no organization did this better and more explicitly than the Sojourners for Justice and Truth (STJ), a short-lived but important national black women’s organization dedicated to ‘the full dignity of Negro womanhood.’ Two African-American women, Louise Thompson Patterson… and Belulah Richardson… organized the STJ in the fall of 1951. Patterson and Richardson sought to unite black women across social, political, and economic lines in an effort to end white violence and terror. “We will no longer in sight of God or man,” the women proclaimed, “sit by and watch our lives destroyed by an unreasonable and unreasoning hate that metes out to us every kind of death.”

Speaking as mothers, wives, daughters, sisters, and witnesses to sexualized violence, the members of the STJ issued a pamphlet that assailed white supremacy and called for a national meeting of black women in Washington, D.C., “We have seen our brothers beaten, shot, and stamped to death by police {and} we have seen our daughters raped and degraded, and when one dares rise in defense of her honor she is jailed for life.” By inviting black women to come “speak {their} mind” and issuing the call in the “spirit of Harriet Tubman and Sojourner Truth,” the STJ rooted themselves in a “radical black feminist tradition of resistance” and the tradition of testimony.

from At the Dark End of the Street- Black Women, Rape, and Resistance.

what was that shit i was reading last week about black womyn doing nothing and being apolitical? just in case you can’t do that math, black womyn were organizing around sexual violence, gendered discrimination and bodily integrity twenty years before upper middle class college educated white womyn “invented” feminism.

this book, y’all. read it.

(via cupcakesnotbombs)
poemsofthedead-deactivated20120
Ten years later thousands of working- and middle-class women, fed up with decades of abuse, took tot he streets to protest their mistreatment and demand the right to ‘sit with dignity’. The Montgomery bus boycott, frequently regarded as the spark plug of the modern civil rights movement, was actually the end of a drive chain that ran back into decades of black women’s activism. That supposedly “spontaneous” event [of Rosa Parks refusing to give up her seat] was, in fact, the culmination of a deep history of gendered political appeals - frequently led by black veterans - for the protection of African American women from sexual and physical assault. Only by understanding the relatively hidden history of sexualized violence in Montgomery, Alabama, and African Americans’ efforts to protect black womanhood, can we see that the Motgomery bus boycott was more than a movement for civil rights. It was also a women’s movement for dignity, respect, and bodily integrity.

- At the Dark End of the Street: Black Women, Rape, and Resistance - a New History of the Civil Rights Movement from Rosa Parks to the Rise of Black Power by Danielle L. McGuire

y’all i’m reading a really gr8 book. you should probably check this shit out. it tells the stories of the black womyn activists that are generally reduced to footnotes in mainstream historical accounts of the modern civil rights movement. i was a little offput to find out that the author is a white womyn (our stories are getting told the same way they always do, i suppose), but it’s still super interesting and informative. i would love to know if something like this has been written by black womyn writers!

(via cupcakesnotbombs)

::GASP:: But I heard via Tumblr that PoC have never “done anything” before and it’s up to white people occupying Wall Street to fix everything and we should be grateful…

(SARCASM)

witchymerqueer
Ten years later thousands of working- and middle-class women, fed up with decades of abuse, took tot he streets to protest their mistreatment and demand the right to ‘sit with dignity’. The Montgomery bus boycott, frequently regarded as the spark plug of the modern civil rights movement, was actually the end of a drive chain that ran back into decades of black women’s activism. That supposedly “spontaneous” event [of Rosa Parks refusing to give up her seat] was, in fact, the culmination of a deep history of gendered political appeals - frequently led by black veterans - for the protection of African American women from sexual and physical assault. Only by understanding the relatively hidden history of sexualized violence in Montgomery, Alabama, and African Americans’ efforts to protect black womanhood, can we see that the Motgomery bus boycott was more than a movement for civil rights. It was also a women’s movement for dignity, respect, and bodily integrity.

- At the Dark End of the Street: Black Women, Rape, and Resistance - a New History of the Civil Rights Movement from Rosa Parks to the Rise of Black Power by Danielle L. McGuire

y’all i’m reading a really gr8 book. you should probably check this shit out. it tells the stories of the black womyn activists that are generally reduced to footnotes in mainstream historical accounts of the modern civil rights movement. i was a little offput to find out that the author is a white womyn (our stories are getting told the same way they always do, i suppose), but it’s still super interesting and informative. i would love to know if something like this has been written by black womyn writers!

(via cupcakesnotbombs)
squeetothegee-deactivated201111

unapproachableblackchicks:

Based on the OVERWHELMING response I have received from everyone that was ignited from the Lena Baker story (the first and only woman executed in the State of Georgia) I thought it would be beneficial to share the trailer of the biopic starring Tichina Arnold. If you have Netflix, I would highly recommend you check it out this film. It’s heartbreaking, yet a revealing visual into to tragic life and state mandated murder of Lena Baker. Let’s keep the memory of this woman alive, and continue to educate the world about the injustice that lies at the foundation of the death penalty. -CB

The Lena Baker Story Trailer