blueklectic
ayiman:

apihtawikosisan:

Archival photos from around the original signing of Treaty 8 in 1899.  Notice the distinct lack of headdresses?  This one shows Chief Keenooshayo (kinosêw) in 1904. More archival pictures here.  I like to show these kinds of images to people who imagine the Treaty signings with all war-bonneted natives on one side and slick Europeans in suits on the other.  The truth was, First Nations had a mix of clothing back then and European clothes were not uncommon.  Sort of turns assumptions on their head.

Swag.
Settlers can’t even.

ayiman:

apihtawikosisan:

Archival photos from around the original signing of Treaty 8 in 1899.  Notice the distinct lack of headdresses?  This one shows Chief Keenooshayo (kinosêw) in 1904. More archival pictures here.  I like to show these kinds of images to people who imagine the Treaty signings with all war-bonneted natives on one side and slick Europeans in suits on the other.  The truth was, First Nations had a mix of clothing back then and European clothes were not uncommon.  Sort of turns assumptions on their head.

Swag.

Settlers can’t even.

strugglingtobeheard
Mr. Joey Carter’s dilemma of whether or not he is a “haole” (Ka Leo, Sept. 6, 1990) can easily be answered. If he is white or “Caucasian” (as he prefers), then he certainly is haole.
This word is one of the few surviving Hawaiian language descriptions in common use in Hawai’i. And it has survived despite official suppression of my Native Hawaiian language by an all-haole, English-speaking American government in 1900. Indeed, Mr. Carter follows in the footsteps of his American haole compatriots who came to Hawai’i in the 19th century demanding that Hawaiians convert to the haole ways of behaving. Now, Mr. Carter demands that we stop using our own land. Too bad, Mr. Carter, you are a haole and you always will be.
And this is precisely Mr. Carter’s typically white American problem: he wants to pretend that he is outside American history, a history which has made white power and white supremacy the governing norm from the birth of the American colonies to the present American imperium that holds the world as a nuclear hostage.
Mr. Carter is a privileged member of American society because he is haole, whether he acknowledges his privilege or not. His very presence in Hawai’i, and before that in Louisiana, is a luxury provided him through centuries of white conquest that visited genocide on American Indians, slavery on Africans, peonage on Asians and dispossession on Native Hawaiians.
Hawai’i is presently a colony of the United States, not because we Hawaiians chose that status, but because the American government overthrew our Hawaiian government in 1883 [sic, 1893], and forcibly annexed our islands in 1898. With the overthrow, things Hawaiian were outlawed and things haole American were imposed.
As an American in Hawai’i, Mr. Carter is benefiting from stolen goods. Part of that benefit is the moral blindness of the settler who insists on his “individuality” when his very presence has nothing to do with his “individuality” and everything to do with his historical position as a member of a white imperialist country. Mr. Carter could examine his own presence here, and how things haole, including the English language, the political and economic systems, and the non-self-governing status of Native Hawaiians allows him to live and work in my country when so many of my own people have been driven out.
Of course, Mr. Carter needs to know, before he learns about Hawaiians, that in the long and bloody march of American history, only African-Americans were classed as 3/5 of a person in the American Constitution, that noble document of democracy. Asians were beaten and killed because they were “yellow peril.” Only Japanese were interned in concentration camps because they were Japanese, only American Indians were “removed” and “terminated” as a people because they were Indian.
In fact, Mr. Carter does not understand racism at all, another common characteristic of white people. For racism is a system of power in which one racially-identified group dominates and exploits another racially-identified group for the advantage of the dominating group. People of color in America don’t have enough power to dominate and exploit white people. That’s what the so-called “founding fathers” of the United States intended, and that’s how American society operates today. But Mr. Carter hasn’t noticed this reality.
The hatred and fear people of color have of white people is based on that ugly history Mr. Carter is pretending to have an “individual” exemption from, and which he refuses to acknowledge. It is for self-protection and in self-defense that we people of color feel hostility towards haoles.
Contrary to what Mr. Carter believes, this hostility is not “haole-bashing”; it is a smart political sense honed by our deep historical wounding at the hands of the haole. On the rare occasions that we feel something other than hostility, something like trust or friendship for certain haole, it is because we have made an exception for them. It is our privilege and not Mr. Carter’s privilege to make exceptions, and to make them one by one. For it would be the mark of extreme historical stupidity to trust all haoles.
In his uninformed, childish moaning, Mr. Carter flaunts his willful ignorance of where he is (in my native country, Hawai’i), and who he is (a haole American). Of course, his statements are disingenuous. If Mr. Carter does not like being called haole, he can return to Louisiana. Hawaiians would certainly benefit from one less haole in our land. In fact, United Airlines has dozens of flights to the U.S. continent every day, Mr. Carter. Why don’t you take one?
Caucasians are haole By Haunani Kay Trask in response to this letter (the site I got this from is a load of crap, just go on there to read his letter and ignore everything else)
deliciouskaek

Caonabo was a cacique, or Taino chiefs, on the island of Hayti (called Hispaniola by the Spanish). In the book The Peoples of the Caribbean: An Encyclopedia of Archeology and Traditional by Nicholas J. Saunders, Caonabo’s name is defined as meaning “He Who is Like Gold”, or “King of the Golden House”,
Cacique Caonabo took revenge on the Spaniards and brought Fort Navidad to ashes (being a little dramatic here, but the fact remains it was destroyed).
In late winter of 1493, Columbus returned to Haiti, this time bringing with him a hoard of adventurers from Spain to settle in the eastern part of Hispaniola, since they arrived to find La Navidad annihilated. Haiti became divided, the Spaniards vs. the Taino Indians (Arawaks/Caribs). Caonabo more resentful than ever of the presence of the foreigners on his land took it up himself to lead the Tainos into a full-pledged revolt. Columbus recruited the services of Alonzo Ojeda, who tricked Caonabo into being taken as Columbus’s prisoner (they used a trinket that the Tainos thought sacred as a ruse to lure him, and from there they bound the Arawak chief).
(source)

Caonabo was a cacique, or Taino chiefs, on the island of Hayti (called Hispaniola by the Spanish). In the book The Peoples of the Caribbean: An Encyclopedia of Archeology and Traditional by Nicholas J. Saunders, Caonabo’s name is defined as meaning “He Who is Like Gold”, or “King of the Golden House”,

Cacique Caonabo took revenge on the Spaniards and brought Fort Navidad to ashes (being a little dramatic here, but the fact remains it was destroyed).

In late winter of 1493, Columbus returned to Haiti, this time bringing with him a hoard of adventurers from Spain to settle in the eastern part of Hispaniola, since they arrived to find La Navidad annihilated. Haiti became divided, the Spaniards vs. the Taino Indians (Arawaks/Caribs). Caonabo more resentful than ever of the presence of the foreigners on his land took it up himself to lead the Tainos into a full-pledged revolt. Columbus recruited the services of Alonzo Ojeda, who tricked Caonabo into being taken as Columbus’s prisoner (they used a trinket that the Tainos thought sacred as a ruse to lure him, and from there they bound the Arawak chief).

(source)

deluxvivens-deactivated20130417

deluxvivens:

littleangrytiger:

PSA: if you don’t plan to include Black folks in your indigenous decolonization, gtfo.

sofriel:

If your decolonization doesn’t take into account the way indigeneity is experienced in the Southeastern US, in the Caribbean, South America and the way it interacts with Blackness there and elsewhere, and the fact that there are indigenous people in Africa too, that Black people in the Americas are descendants of indigenous people put through forced removal, then your decolonization is FLAWED.

I understand people needing to focus only on their community, that marginalized indigenous people are not obligated to solve the entire world’s problems, and maybe these issues aren’t as salient for people on reservations out West where the population is almost entirely white and Indian. But if that’s the case, then don’t go sticking your nose in other indigenous people’s business. And if you are gonna talk about decolonization in general, you better be prepared to listen.

Maybe it’s irrelevant for me to say, because I do recognize the shared issues and shared histories, as well as know many Black-Native mixed peeps. But um. I can’t help thinking this complaint should be reversed.

I see a lot less Black activism that seems to remember Natives exist, than Natives who forget about Black issues. And the racial discussion/focus in the US are almost entirely Black & White.. even though it’s our native land. If it seems like we only focus on Native-exclusive issues sometimes, it’s because we’re pretty damn sure no one else will.

I kind of want to tell you to shut the fuck up. Even though I agree with you.

“I kind of want to tell you to shut the fuck up. Even though I agree with you.”

So basically you are telling me (and i guess the op?) to shut up while saying you agree? I think you need to pick one.  Let me know which.

*gets popcorn* I love that somehow black Americans are responsible for the framing of racial dialogue in America. What with all our social & political power to bring about massive changes in the blink of an eye…oh wait. Maybe we can talk about anti-black racism in Native communities & how that has a lot to do with the context of the OP? Nah, I bet that’s not going to come up at all.

rematiration-deactivated2013111

adailyriot:

Well, folks, Mitt the Mormon has locked the GOP presidential candidacy, and for the first time in 10 years I’m giving serious consideration to spending the morning of Nov. 6 at the beach or bar or breakfast table—anywhere but that vile voting booth.

But we’re not talking about my waning will to vote here, or about the royal race for the American crown, or the fact that Mittens and his fellow didactic, dogmatic Mormon congregates inexorably believe that American Indians are the direct descendants of thieves and thugs, sinners and sots.

No. We’ll examine that mawkish Mormon-based Lamanite mythology another time. Today, we’re talking about Catholicism, the Sisters of Loretto and the former nun Mary Helen Sandoval of Denver.

Sandoval said she and her fellow Sisters of Loretto, a national organization of nuns, non-Catholics and human rights activists, are drafting a proposition that demands Pope Benedict XVI immediately repeal Inter Caetera—a more than 500-year-old papal bull that inarguably opened the floodgates to land, gold, and slave-seeking European settlers into the “New World.”

Their “New World” is our “old country.” Remember that. But I digress.

According to Sandoval, the Sisters of Loretto will celebrate their bicentennial with an assembly July 17 to 23 in St. Louis, Mo. It will be at this function that Sandoval and 40 other Denver members will present their proposition to a delegation of 35 voting nuns.

If the proposition passes, Sandoval said, then it’s off to the pope in Vatican City for his review or rejection.

“If we had any sense that the proposal that we take to St. Louis would not pass, then we wouldn’t take it to the assembly,” Sandoval said with tinge of confidence.

“Let’s say the proposal passes,” I said. “Are you optimistic about the pope’s response should you receive one?”

“No,” Sandoval said gruffly. “I think that his response will be just the same as it’s been since people first asked that (Inter Caetera) be rescinded.”

“And have you the full support of your congregation?” I pressed.

“There are definitely people in the community that will probably hesitate to confront the pope,” she said. “I would not say that is the majority of people in this community … the majority of people in this community at this point are pretty disgusted with the pope. Pretty disgusted is a mild way of saying it.”

Sandoval, whose stint as a nun lasted only three and a half years, said that she learned of Inter Caetera in January during an assembly at the University of Denver when an unnamed speaker reeled about the sour edict’s vicious vernacular.

“People don’t know,” Sandoval said. “People are ignorant about it the same as I am. I think in general there needs to be education about what the Inter Caetera says.”

Following that conversation, I tried to contact a priest and see if a random cleric is familiar with the papal bull and whether or not they’d support Sandoval and the Sisters.

I ambled into the Basilica of the Immaculate Conception in downtown Denver and demanded to speak “to the priest on duty” about Inter Caetera and its foul pseudo-pious language.

Suddenly, some officious oaf in khakis gripped me from behind and two cops helped him remove me from the church like a drunkard and said I was “causing a scene.”

“What do you guys know about Inter Caetera?” I shouted.

“Get out!” one barked.

Yes, I could’ve easily called and made an appointment under false pretenses and slipped in questions about the papal bull like some gangly grifter, but frankly where’s the fun in that? And secondly, it’s been my experience that neither conservative Catholic nor blind patriot is eager to discuss the bevy of skeletons in the dingy American closet.

Right.

I called Sandoval back a couple hours later and asked her why she and her 40 fellow members would like to see Inter Caetera abolished.

“The whole Doctrine of Discovery has influenced legal decisions—influenced the way our whole legal system treated American Indian people in the past, but it still influences it today because that’s not been gotten rid of,” she said excitedly. “That’s what’s so horrific about it. I mean, it’s bad enough that that was ever (enacted) in the first place back in the 1400s, but the fact that it was used in legal decisions as a reasoning, really, for the annihilation (of Native Americans).”

Sandoval said she is no longer Catholic, and neither am I for that matter.

There was a time when I was Catholic, but those days are over now and for reasons too bloody and God awful to reel about here. It’s not every day a 200-year-old national Catholic organization is poised to take on the pope for injustices against indigenous peoples. Indeed.

This would be a fine time to light some sage. And that’s what I’m off to do. Hopefully some of the sacred smoke will waft its way through the hallowed halls of the Vatican and sway the pope into doing the right thing. If he can canonize Kateri Tekakwitha, he can rescind Inter Caetera. Yes, sir.

Simon Moya-Smith, 28, is an Oglala Lakota journalist and blogger from Denver. He’ll attend Columbia University School of Journalism in the fall.




karenhealey

Hip hop?? Yeah, well YOU can stop: exploitative workshops targeting Indigenous kids

renoriginal:

I have a gripe, and that gripe is the proliferation of hip hop workshops targeted at Indigenous mob, particularly young fullas. You may think that this is weird, a long term, hard core Indigenous hiphop-head who doesn’t believe in hip hop workshops? Well, let me explain. I love hip hop. I grew up on hip hop. I’ve taken a hell of a lot, and learned a hell of a lot from hip hop. I do believe that it can give a voice to the voiceless.  My issue with these workshops is the exploitation and paternalism that is rampant is so many of these programs. This is not an attack on all programs, because there are some good ones out there that do great work, nor is this breakdown based on one group in particular. This is my opinion, in consultation with other Indigenous practitioners, on some of the biggest issues we have seen with these programs. Let’s have the discussion so we can get this out in the open and hopefully change things around for the better.

Disadvantage: we KNOW, nearly every, if not all, indicator of disadvantage shows Indigenous people as the most disadvantaged group in Australian society. WE LIVE IT EVERY DAMN DAY!!! Personally, I believe that it is hard to build anything positive from a foundation where you want to push the disadvantage aspect so damn hard!!! Don’t sugar coat it, don’t over look it. Recognise it. Don’t harp on it. And don’t you dare exploit it so that you can get funding, build a profile for yourself, or make yourself sleep easier at night because you’re ticking off your good deed. Like Tina Turner said, we don’t need another hero. We don’t need saviours. There are many programs out there that have been designed WITH Indigenous people, not FOR us. We don’t need you to tell us HOW to turn our lives around. The biggest thing is for you to recognise and try to understand our story. Most importantly, YOU CANNOT HAVE EMPOWERMENT THROUGH REINFORCING DISADVANTAGE.

At risk youth: if you don’t have the skills to work with at-risk kids, you can do more harm than if you had done nothing. Someone else then has to deal with the aftermath and most often it is not the fly-by-night program providers. I’m not even going to try and delve into diversionary programs at this time.

Paternalism: If you don’t know what this word means, look it up. I’m going to go out on a limb and say that paternalism underlies just about every government policy to date. It’s why they are guaranteed to fail so miserably. If you want a current example of paternalism, look at the NT Intervention. Many of these hip hop programs are done without ANY consultation or involvement from  Indigenous people. Put simply, they are done FOR us. We don’t need you to tell us how to improve our lives. That is paternalism.  If you have skills that would be of benefit to pass on, work WITH us. As the saying goes, the road to hell is paved with good intentions. Good intentions don’t make a program right. Not by a long stretch. I have often asked people involved in workshop programs a very simple question as to their interest in this work, and that question is: why? There are not many that can answer this question in a way that is not intrinsically paternalistic. When people can’t recognise that, and try to address it, then there is a problem.

Let’s think for a minute, lets imagine that I decide one day, with no experience or background in the religion, that I had a vision for lets say Jewish kids. So I decided that they should do hip hop and off I go. I identify that there’s targeted funding for programs with these kids, which I promptly apply for, I might have a meeting over coffee with a few Jewish friends of friends, and off I go running my workshops. Hey, some kids might not engage, but I’ve got this one that will and I’m going to push them. Got their track, got their picture, I’m going to use it to push my program… Can you imagine the outrage if I started going into the Jewish community with my vision for their kids!! Let’s also say that I am from a different religious group, let’s say I’m catholic, which I never openly declare in my promotional material, but you know, I have some words to the kids about how great my religion is while I work with them and ‘gently encourage’ to consider conversion. This happens with some programs with Aboriginal kids!! Do you know why people can get away with this? Because you are dealing with one of the most disadvantaged group in society!!! Funders very rarely want to fund culturally appropriate programs with long term sustainable outcomes because they rely on quantitative outcomes over a short term.

Mob!! We need to stop making it so easy for just any program to have access to our kids! Exercise some quality control and guidance. Instead of us bitching about this provider and that provider on the quiet. Lets start pulling them up and making them accountable! If they don’t have a reasonable number of Aboriginal employees with a reasonable level of training and experience, and if they don’t have meaningful cosultation processes: don’t support them. It is that simple.

Self-determination: Said it before, I’ll say it again (and again, and again) you have NO place in Indigenous issues if you do not have an understanding of self-determination. Contrary to what many governments would have us believe, self determination is NOT a dirty word. It is the only way to achieve sustainable, long-term change. Many of these programs have NO understanding of self-determination, let alone know how to incorporate it into their programs. Go do some research on it and then come back and see me.

Skills: Seriously, how many ‘never were’s’ are we going to keep sustaining through these programs? There are quite a few artists that basically only have a name through riding off their ‘Indigenous workshops’ portfolio. They have no respect within the scene that they claim to have mad skills in! So what skills are you passing on again??

Relevance: believe it or not, not every Indigenous kid is into hip hop. Nor are they all at risk. Nor are they all into sports. We’re a diverse mob, with diverse interests, including musically. Needs also change geographically. One size does not fit all. How do you know what the community you’re working with needs? YOU WORK WITH IT!!! You don’t take a program to a community, you develop one WITH them!

Exploitation: if you are using the workshops & kids to promote your name: you’re being exploitive. If you don’t have a reputation except for pushing these workshops: you’re being exploitive. If you take usage of the products of the workshop and it’s easier to find out your name than the name of the kids that actually did it: that’s exploitation. If you’re in it purely for the money and access to grants: that’s exploitation. If you push ‘them’ to promote ‘you’: that’s exploitation. If you take intellectual property rights: that’s exploitation. If you don’t follow protocols around Indigenous culture: that’s exploitation. If your program isn’t giving something back to the community: that’s exploitation. If you undercut Indigenous artists: that’s exploitation. If you’re taking money away from properly constructed programs: THAT’S FUCKED!!!

Also, do not put the terms ‘Indigenous’, ‘Aboriginal’, ‘Mob’ etc in your name unless you actually are an Indigenous business (looking at you Indigenous Hip Hop Projects). If you are a religious based or funded program, be up front about it so Indigenous parents can make an informed decision as to what they are exposing their children to.

Gatekeepers: These organisations/individuals often become gatekeepers for the broader community wanting to access Indigenous music and musicians. Whether it’s intentional or not, these organizations usually focus on forging a profile for themselves, rather than an outcome for others. When non-Indigenous Australians want to access Indigenous musicians, because they don’t know any better themselves, and because of the number of issues associated with the profile of Indigenous music (which is a whole other post) they will often go to these groups in the first instance as that’s what they are aware of. How many Indigenous music panels/forums will have 1 indigenous artist, and then the rest of the panel members made up of Non-Indigenous (including ‘migrant “Indigenous”’ people as well), talking about Indigenous music!!! This has GOT TO STOP!! Two big issues that arise out of this is that often, these groups will only recommend artists that they work with. Secondly, if they do youth work, they often push these kids forward too fast. This can actually hamper, rather than develop, a musical career (again, a whole other post). It perpetuates the stereotype that Indigenous music is underdeveloped and childlike. It also means that upcoming Indigenous musicians get looked over yet again for gigs.

Indigenous music: Often these groups get a lot of media attention for the kids tracks. After all, this is the ‘easy’, ‘cute’ ‘soft and fluffy’ stuff that media is willing to cover when it comes to Indigenous issues. Not entirely bad in itself, but the kids aren’t necessary trying to have a career in the music industry and, generally, this is their first (and often last) track. Can you imagine if you had heard your favourite muso from their very first attempt at music? So let’s take it further, if said producer is pretty crap, as can often be the case, and/or they don’t have the skills to develop the kids lyricism… I hope you get the picture of where this can leave the final product, which is then promoted by the workshop providers. It’s often treated as a gimic, and the attention that it is given creates the impression that this is where Indigenous hip hop is at. There are many Indigenous hip hop artists who are dope, there have been for YEARS, but they often get overlooked because these organisations are acting as the gatekeepers and/or ‘experts’ of Indigenous music.

 

Finally, NO-ONE should have a vision for Indigenous kids but those kids themselves. To make your vision their vision is paternalism and it is not addressing disadvantage. Instead, support these kids to believe in themselves. Provide a safe space for them to be themselves. Help support them to deal with the racism that we face each and every damn day!!! Help make those opportunities to develop further if that’s what’s wanted. Train them to be a trainer themselves if that’s what they want. Provide opportunities, including employment, for Indigenous musicians who are often overlooked and ostracised from the industries. Most importantly, do not be so arrogant as to presume that you know better than Indigenous communities themselves.

No program working with Indigenous communities should dare even consider itself legitimate without real input and inclusion of Indigenous people themselves. Otherwise it’s just a case of history repeating itself.

 

*I welcome comments and discussion on this post.  I take ownership over any structural, spelling or grammar issues so please do not engage if that is going to be your only contribution.  Thanks to those that contributed, you know who you are.*

yakuntiklaylie

Top 10 myths about Native Americans

camourl:

  • Native Americans get special privileges, including a monthly check, from the U.S. government. False:According to the U.S. Department of Interior, there has long been a myth that Indians receive a monthly check from the U.S. Government because of their status as Indians. There is no basis for this belief other than misinformation and misconception of the status of American Indians. Some tribes,? tribal members and lineal descendants received payments from the Federal Government resulting from claims settlements. But there are very few judgment funds per capita payments that remain today. Some tribes distribute payments to enrolled members upon the sale of tribal assets such as timber, hydroelectric power or oil and gas. Many tribes do not have natural resources or other revenue sources.
  • Native Americans do not pay U.S. taxes. False: American Indians, even those who receive a per capita payment from proceeds of tribally owned casinos, pay U.S. income tax to the IRS.
  • Native Americans are rich from gambling revenues. False: Nearly 25 percent of Native Americans live below the U.S. poverty level. Tribes that owned casinos use proceeds to fund tribal schools, medical clinics, roads, elder care, child care, college scholarships, etc. and/or distribute proceeds among tribe members through per capita payments.
  • Native American tribes are not subject to U.S. law. False:Federally recognized Native American tribes are “domestic dependent nations” with certain inherent powers of self-government and entitlement to certain federal benefits, services and protections because of the special trust relationship.
  • Sporting teams honor Native Americans by using cultural symbols for names and mascots. False:The United Methodist Church joined numerous Native American organizations in protesting this practice when the 2000 General Conference adopted resolution No. 141 stating such “caricature…does demean and diminish Native Americans by denying them recognition as human beings in the [teams’]… use and abuse for economic profits.”
  • All Native Americans live on reservations. False:Only 34 percent of Native Americans lived on reservations or designated statistical areas in 2000.
  • American Indians are a dying race. False:The Native American population is increasing and the many tribal cultures and languages are alive.
  • Native Americans all have the same culture. False:There are 561 federally recognized Native American tribes and nations, each with its own culture, language and stories.
  • Native Americans are not full citizens of the United States because they belong to their own sovereign nations. False:On June 2, 1924, President Calvin Coolidge signed a bill granting Native Americans full citizenship.
  • The Native American population is decreasing. False: Native Americans are growing in number and their many cultures, languages and stories are alive.
deluxvivens-deactivated20130417
deluxvivens:

selchieproductions:

Fashion - or how the Fashion Industries Steal or Things
The lijnie is a traditional shawl worn by Saami women and this year Louis Vuitton is stealing the design and selling it for loads of money. 
Sorry Louis Vuitton, but my people wears it better than your skinny models.
Solveig Labba


wow.

deluxvivens:

selchieproductions:

Fashion - or how the Fashion Industries Steal or Things

The lijnie is a traditional shawl worn by Saami women and this year Louis Vuitton is stealing the design and selling it for loads of money. 

Sorry Louis Vuitton, but my people wears it better than your skinny models.


Solveig Labba


wow.

jhameia
jhameia:


Imagining Indigenous FuturismsScience Fiction Writing Contest$1000 Award
Open to Native, First Nations, Indigenous, and Aboriginal students currently enrolled part-time or full-time in any accredited university, college, or high school.
This year’s Judge: Acclaimed SF, experimental fiction, and horror writer Stephen Graham Jones (Blackfeet), author of The Fast Red Road: A Plainsong, The Bird Is Gone: A Manifesto, Ledfeather, and much more. http://www.demontheory.net/
Entrants should submit a personal statement (one paragraph) containing affiliation or descent, student status (the where, the when, the why, and the how much more), and goals for their sf writing, along with the previously unpublished writing sample of approximately 4,000 words.
Contest Deadline: November 1, 2012Winner announced in December
Send personal statement andpreviously unpublished sf story (up to 4,000 words)to Professor Grace L. Dillon (Anishinaabe)as attachments to
dillong@pdx.edu
Or mail to Professor Grace L. Dillon, Indigenous Nations Studies Program, Portland State University, POB 751, Portland, OR 97207-0751.
Sponsored by the Indigenous Nations Studies ProgramPortland State University

Please reblog widely!!

jhameia:

Imagining Indigenous Futurisms
Science Fiction Writing Contest
$1000 Award

Open to Native, First Nations, Indigenous, and Aboriginal students currently enrolled part-time or full-time in any accredited university, college, or high school.

This year’s Judge: Acclaimed SF, experimental fiction, and horror writer Stephen Graham Jones (Blackfeet), author of The Fast Red Road: A Plainsong, The Bird Is Gone: A Manifesto, Ledfeather, and much more. http://www.demontheory.net/

Entrants should submit a personal statement (one paragraph) containing affiliation or descent, student status (the where, the when, the why, and the how much more), and goals for their sf writing, along with the previously unpublished writing sample of approximately 4,000 words.

Contest Deadline: November 1, 2012
Winner announced in December

Send personal statement and
previously unpublished sf story (up to 4,000 words)
to Professor Grace L. Dillon (Anishinaabe)
as attachments to

dillong@pdx.edu

Or mail to Professor Grace L. Dillon, Indigenous Nations Studies Program, Portland State University, POB 751, Portland, OR 97207-0751.

Sponsored by the Indigenous Nations Studies Program
Portland State University

Please reblog widely!!

deluxvivens-deactivated20130417

I just found out that a 14 years old Saami boy was attacked and physically abused by three men in Märsta, north of Stockholm.

deluxvivens:

selchieproductions:

The reason why? He was apparently wearing a Saami hat that his attackers didn’t like. 

The fuck?

This is the shit people who dare to publicly ‘out’ themselves as Saami in Sweden have to deal with on a regular basis. 

…yet we keep hearing about how there’s no racism over there.