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jalwhite
jalwhite:

tw: suicide
Entire Indian tribe threatens to commit mass suicide after Brazil court rules they must leave sacred burial land
A entire tribe of 170 Indians have vowed to commit mass suicide after a court in Brazil ruled they must leave what they believe is sacred land, it was reported today.
The community of 50 men, 50 women and 70 children from the Guarani-kaiowa tribe are camped inside a ranch in Brazil’s southern state of Mato Grosso do Sul.
The Indians claim the land has been the graveyard of their ancestors for centuries, according to Brazil’s Indigenous Missionary Council (CIMI).
A Guarani Indian family ride a horse-drawn cart in southern Brazil in 2004. The Indians claim the disputed land has been the graveyard of their ancestors for centuries
But this week, Judge Henrique Bonachela upheld a petition made by the ranch’s owner to have the tribe evicted from the land.
He decreed a fine of £150 for every day the tribe remains on the land, on the banks of Brazil’s Joguico River.
A spokesman for the tribe today said they do not intend to fight the judge’s decision but would rather die on the land than be made to leave.
And in a letter the tribe called on the Brazilian government to respect their wishes to be buried there along with their ancestors.
It read: ‘Because of this historic fact, we would prefer to die and be buried together with our ancestors right here where we are now.
‘We ask, one time for all, for the government to decree our extinction as a tribe, and to send tractors to dig a big hole and there to throw our dead bodies.
‘We have all decided that we will not leave this place, neither alive nor dead.’

Battle: A spokesman for the tribe said they do not intend to fight the judge’s decision but would rather die on the land than be made to leave.



Remote: The tribe is camped inside a ranch in Brazil’s southern state of Mato Grosso do Sul


A spokesman for CIMI described the development as of ‘exceptional seriousness’.
And Federal Deputy Sarney Filho warned of the ‘extremely worrying’ situation.
In a letter to Brazil’s Justice Minsitry, he wrote: ‘This tribe has had its culture and lands attacked for centuries. They could now go down in history as being the tribe which wiped themselves out by committing collective suicide.
‘We must take the necessary measures to avert the worst.’
Indian tribes in southern Brazil have for years been fighting for the country to recognise their traditional lands, many of which now belong to farmers and rich landowners.

jalwhite:

tw: suicide

Entire Indian tribe threatens to commit mass suicide after Brazil court rules they must leave sacred burial land

A entire tribe of 170 Indians have vowed to commit mass suicide after a court in Brazil ruled they must leave what they believe is sacred land, it was reported today.

The community of 50 men, 50 women and 70 children from the Guarani-kaiowa tribe are camped inside a ranch in Brazil’s southern state of Mato Grosso do Sul.

The Indians claim the land has been the graveyard of their ancestors for centuries, according to Brazil’s Indigenous Missionary Council (CIMI).

A Guarani Indian family ride a horse-drawn cart in southern Brazil in 2004. The Indians claim the disputed land has been the graveyard of their ancestors for centuries

But this week, Judge Henrique Bonachela upheld a petition made by the ranch’s owner to have the tribe evicted from the land.

He decreed a fine of £150 for every day the tribe remains on the land, on the banks of Brazil’s Joguico River.

A spokesman for the tribe today said they do not intend to fight the judge’s decision but would rather die on the land than be made to leave.

And in a letter the tribe called on the Brazilian government to respect their wishes to be buried there along with their ancestors.

It read: ‘Because of this historic fact, we would prefer to die and be buried together with our ancestors right here where we are now.

‘We ask, one time for all, for the government to decree our extinction as a tribe, and to send tractors to dig a big hole and there to throw our dead bodies.

‘We have all decided that we will not leave this place, neither alive nor dead.’

Battle: A spokesman for the tribe said they do not intend to fight the judge’s decision but would rather die on the land than be made to leave.

Remote: The tribe is camped inside a ranch in Brazil’s southern state of Mato Grosso do Sul

A spokesman for CIMI described the development as of ‘exceptional seriousness’.

And Federal Deputy Sarney Filho warned of the ‘extremely worrying’ situation.

In a letter to Brazil’s Justice Minsitry, he wrote: ‘This tribe has had its culture and lands attacked for centuries. They could now go down in history as being the tribe which wiped themselves out by committing collective suicide.

‘We must take the necessary measures to avert the worst.’

Indian tribes in southern Brazil have for years been fighting for the country to recognise their traditional lands, many of which now belong to farmers and rich landowners.

(via spookyfluffaloforbossofmybutt)

The Youngstown food bank that was used by Paul Ryan and his caravan for a photo-op is losing donors for its manager speaking out about the visit

bullmittartist:

abaldwin360:

When the charity’s president, Brian J. Antal, found out about Ryan’s stunt, he was furious. Ryan and his campaign had “ramrodded” their way into the kitchen, Antal told The Washington Post on Monday.

“We’re a faith-based organization,” he said. “We are apolitical because the majority of our funding is from private donations. It’s strictly in our bylaws not to do it. They showed up there, and they did not have permission. They got one of the volunteers to open up the doors. … The photo op they did wasn’t even accurate. He did nothing. He just came in here to get his picture taken at the dining hall.”

Public reaction was ferocious — and much of it has targeted Antal.

When I talked to Antal on Tuesday afternoon, he said he was starting to worry “a little bit” for the safety of his family. A young child wailed in the background as he described the barrage of angry calls he’d been fielding ever since the story broke.

“They keep accusing me of being partisan,” he said. “They say they’re donors who will never give again because of what I said.” None of them would give a name.

read more

WOW.

Attacking a fucking charity because the person who runs it didn’t appreciate it being used for a photo-op. More fucking conservative bullshit. This is a charity, A FUCKING CHARITY, and the guy is receiving threatening phone calls because he doesn’t fall in line with the Republicans.

This is total utter bullshit, but unfortunately not surprising considering the way conservatives attack everything that goes outside their little bubble so furiously. 

I don’t think I can properly express how majorly fucked up this is.

(via alltruthwaitsinallthings-deacti)

wilwheaton

Mirror of “Mind The Binder”

wilwheaton:

I’m just making a mirror of the blog post at The Phoenix, because their server is melting at the moment:

Mind The Binder

Published Oct 16 2012, 10:46 PM by David S. Bernstein

Hey, I know about that binder! And guess what — Mitt Romney was lying about it.

From the rush transcript

CROWLEY: Governor Romney, pay equity for women?

ROMNEY: Thank you. An important topic, and one which I learned a great deal about, particularly as I was serving as governor of my state, because I had the chance to pull together a cabinet and all the applicants seemed to be men.

And I — and I went to my staff, and I said, “How come all the people for these jobs are — are all men.” They said, “Well, these are the people that have the qualifications.” And I said, “Well, gosh, can’t we — can’t we find some — some women that are also qualified?”

And — and so we — we took a concerted effort to go out and find women who had backgrounds that could be qualified to become members of our cabinet.

I went to a number of women’s groups and said, “Can you help us find folks,” and they brought us whole binders full of women.

I was proud of the fact that after I staffed my Cabinet and my senior staff, that the University of New York in Albany did a survey of all 50 states, and concluded that mine had more women in senior leadership positions than any other state in America.

Now one of the reasons I was able to get so many good women to be part of that team was because of our recruiting effort.

Not a true story.

What actually happened was that in 2002 — prior to the election, not even knowing yet whether it would be a Republican or Democratic administration — a bipartisan group of women in Massachusetts formed MassGAP to address the problem of few women in senior leadership positions in state government. There were more than 40 organizations involved with the Massachusetts Women’s Political Caucus (also bipartisan) as the lead sponsor.

They did the research and put together the binder full of women qualified for all the different cabinet positions, agency heads, and authorities and commissions. They presented this binder to Governor Romney when he was elected.

I have written about this before, in various contexts; tonight I’ve checked with several people directly involved in the MassGAP effort who confirm that this history as I’ve just presented it is correct — and that Romney’s claim tonight, that he asked for such a study, is false.

I will write more about this later, but for tonight let me just make a few quick additional points. First of all, according to MassGAP and MWPC, Romney did appoint 14 women out of his first 33 senior-level appointments, which is a reasonably impressive 42 percent. However, as I have reported before, those were almost all to head departments and agencies that he didn’t care about — and in some cases, that he quite specifically wanted to not really do anything. None of the senior positions Romney cared about — budget, business development, etc. — went to women.

Secondly, a UMass-Boston study found that the percentage of senior-level appointed positions held by women actually declined throughout the Romney administration, from 30.0% prior to his taking office, to 29.7% in July 2004, to 27.6% near the end of his term in November 2006. (It then began rapidly rising when Deval Patrick took office.)

Third, note that in Romney’s story as he tells it, this man who had led and consulted for businesses for 25 years didn’t know any qualified women, or know where to find any qualified women. So what does that say?

(via thunderwishes)

aesalazar

Oh, By The Way, The Binders Full Of Women Story Was Also A Complete Lie

iamateenagefeminist:

What actually happened was that in 2002 — prior to the election, not even knowing yet whether it would be a Republican or Democratic administration — a bipartisan group of women in Massachusetts formed MassGAP to address the problem of few women in senior leadership positions in state government. There were more than 40 organizations involved with the Massachusetts Women’s Political Caucus (also bipartisan) as the lead sponsor.

They did the research and put together the binder full of women qualified for all the different cabinet positions, agency heads, and authorities and commissions. They presented this binder to Governor Romney when he was elected.

Yeah so basically a woman’s group got together in an effort to create change and a white dude in power took credit for it. What else is new. 

(via falsecatalyst)

big-gadje-world

How To Fix American Education

josiahd:

biggadjeworld:

Dear future teachers, administrators & politicians,

1. Recognize the failure of de-segregation:
De-segregation did not fix racial issues and the racism that is inherent in the American education system. The mentality that black students can only learn in a predominantly white environment is a convoluted notion rooted in supremacist ideology. Schools have re-segregated, but more so based upon economic status. In order for children in high poverty areas to learn, we must first recognize that such children have differing needs when they enter the classroom.

2. Make schools a vehicle for social change:
Education is the best way to overcome poverty. Poverty stems from and perpetuates a wide variety of social issues. Not all children come to school fed; feed them. Not all children come to school with a full night’s rest; allow them rest during the day. It is possible to create an environment where family and social issues are dealt with in a non-condescending manner. Not all children start from the same place in life. Some children must deal with unimaginable circumstances & community based schools should be just that; community based schools.

3. Return to neighborhood schools:
Schools that operate in and directly with a community can assist in a variety of community-related issues.

4. Make funding equal:
Property taxes and local property values should never determine the quality of a school. Schools should receive funding on the basis of need & need only. It is not acceptable that such blatant class-ism exists within the education system. The current system ensures the failure of students in lower income school districts.

5. Adopt national standards:
This should be a structured system based on aptitude. There is no “one size fits all” standard. Students with disabilities should have more personalized standards. It needs to be a tiered system with some level of fluctuation allowed.

6. Get rid of the “grade” system:
Students are passed onwards from grade to grade even when there are obvious deficits in a given subject area. Students should pass through levels of a given subject. It is possible that a student is at a fifth grade level in math, but a third grade level in English. This should be reflected in how we structure learning environments.

7. Make the teaching profession more desirable:
Pay teachers better. Give them better benefits. Recognize that a student’s failing is not always a teacher’s fault. Universities should create an environment where education is a selective field. This would also involve making higher education costs lower so that the brightest minds of a given generation can become the educators of the next generation. Re-structure the tenure system so that is fair and balanced. Work with unions, not against them. There is nothing wrong or shameful about protecting the rights of workers. The blatant disrespect of teachers by certain politicians to should be insulting to every single American.

8. Schools are not prisons:
Students should be made to feel safe in a school. They should have tracking devices, metal detectors or any of these outrageous means of curbing behavior. A school setting should be one in which a child feels comfortable and safe.

9. Your new “learning” idea is just as stupid as the last:
Students learn at varying paces; that is a fact. In the entire history of human education, simple learning seemed to suffice. School is not easy. Education should not be a game or, really, even be fun. Our minds should be sufficiently challenged within the means of our abilities. Education should be viewed as an invaluable resource. Realize that every ten years some moronic “philosopher” comes along with some new “learning” theory that will revolutionize education. It won’t. It never has and never will. If you just teach, they will learn.

10. Technology has its place:
Cell phones and computers do not belong in the classroom. They are a distraction. We seemed to be doing just fine before Smart-Boards and IPads. Technology has its place in science and technology courses. Powerpoints are not for every teacher. Some teachers don’t actually teach when using powerpoint presentations. Just because the technology exists does not mean you are obligated to use it.

I am nearly unable to write. I can’t take notes using a notebook. I have to type. This made school very difficult for me until I was old enough that it became a non-issue because people thought it was ok for me to use a computer.

I also usually have to type in order to process what is being said and understand it well enough to participate, even in a discussion-based class.

I have to have a computer, or I can’t do most classes.

So it’s really scary when people say that computers and stuff don’t belong in classrooms, because if enough people think that, then people like me won’t be able to learn in classes.

(via masteradept)

The Denver Post
wisconsinforward:

A shot was fired into the Obama campaign’s Denver headquarters this afternoon.  No one was injured, although people were inside the office when this occurred.  

wisconsinforward:

A shot was fired into the Obama campaign’s Denver headquarters this afternoon.  No one was injured, although people were inside the office when this occurred.  

(via deliciouskaek)

derpinainreallife

Paul Ryan just said that people who are pro-choice should be worried if he and Romney are elected.

derpinainreallife:

Straight from the horse’s mouth, people.

(via alltruthwaitsinallthings-deacti)

a-lightintheattic
kyssthis16:

ravens-nest:

kyssthis16:

ravens-nest:

thinkprogress.org

FACT CHECK

think-progress:

Ryan has opposed abortion access for rape victims since 1998

The whole VP debate fact checked here

(via alltruthwaitsinallthings-deacti)

womanistgamergirl
brashblacknonbeliever:

[yaminatori-is asked you: Could you please explain about the link between the war on drugs and racism? I’ve never connected the two before, or even thought about a connection. Thank you!]
Most, if not all, illegal drugs became illegal due to some really racist ass reasons. The quote that I’m assuming you saw speaks about marijuana and it’s only the tip of the iceberg.
Another instance of racism affecting drug laws would be with cocaine. In the late 1800’s and early 1900’s, cocaine became popular among laborers. It was usually supplied to the workers by their employers. Cocaine was often supplied to black workers, who many employers believed were better physical workers; cocaine was thought to provide added strength and constitution and according to the Medical News, made black people “impervious to the extremes of heat and cold.” Keep in mind that cocaine was not just popular among black people. It was also popular among poorer white people. In some places it was cheaper to obtain than alcohol and had the added benefit of keeping people awake for long periods of time so they could work overtime.
When more and more people began to use cocaine, the media started reporting “epidemics.” These reports made sure to stress the “social threat” of cocaine over it’s adverse health effects. These hyperbolic reports made sure to emphasize the effect cocaine had on black people. For example, in 1901, the Atlanta Constitution reported that “Use of the drug [cocaine] among negroes is growing to an alarming extent.” The New York Times also reported that under the influence of cocaine, “sexual desires are increased and perverted … peaceful negroes become quarrelsome, and timid negroes develop a degree of ‘Dutch courage’ that is sometimes almost incredible.” Even a judge in Mississippi declared that supplying a “negro” with cocaine was more dangerous than injecting a dog with rabies.
These attitudes not only influenced drug law and policy but also led to increased violence against black people. In 1906, a major race riot led by white people erupted; it was sparked by reports of crimes committed by black ‘cocaine fiends.’  White-led, race riots spawning from reports of black people under the influence of cocaine were not uncommon. Police in the South widely adopted the use of a heavier caliber handguns so as to better stop a cocaine-crazed black person – believed to be empowered with super-human strength. Another dangerous myth perpetuated amongst police was that cocaine imbued black people with tremendous accuracy with firearms and therefore police were better advised to shoot first in questionable circumstances.
Now, take time to read those last two sentences again. Police officers in the south, and pretty much all over the country, still do those things to this day. When officers enter black neighborhoods they’re a lot more likely to shoot first and ask questions later. The weapons they use can, at times, be extremely over powered. When they do raids or drug busts in black neighborhoods, the weapons, armor, and vehicles they use make it look like they’re entering a war zone and not simply arresting people. Now, they may not list those stereotypes as the reason they do what they do but I can tell you with absolute certainty that those stereotypes are the basis for their actions.
Eventually, public opinion came to rest against the cocaine user. Criminality was commonly believed to be a natural result of cocaine use. While the historical reality of cocaine’s effect on violence and crime is difficult to disentangle from inflamed perceptions, it does appear that public opinion was swayed by the image of the violent, cocaine-crazed fiend and pushed over the edge by a few violent episodes. It was an image of the cocaine-user that carried acute racial overtones.
The federal government soon stepped in and instituted a national labeling requirement for cocaine and cocaine-containing products through the Food and Drug Act of 1906. The next impactful federal regulation was the Harrison Narcotics Tax Act of 1914. While it’s often seen as the start of prohibition, the act itself was not actually a prohibition on cocaine, but setup a regulatory and licensing regime instead. The Harrison Act did not recognize addiction as a treatable condition and therefore the therapeutic use of cocaine, heroin or morphine to such individuals was outlawed. As of today, cocaine is listed as a Schedule II Controlled Substance under the Controlled Substances Act.
If you need another colorful example of racism and drug laws, take a look at the history of Opium. It is filled to the brim with racism and colonialism.
As far as the modern war on drugs goes, it is in my opinion nothing but institutionalized racism wrapped up in a new blanket. Two articles that explain this quite well can be found here and here.

brashblacknonbeliever:

[yaminatori-is asked you: Could you please explain about the link between the war on drugs and racism? I’ve never connected the two before, or even thought about a connection. Thank you!]

Most, if not all, illegal drugs became illegal due to some really racist ass reasons. The quote that I’m assuming you saw speaks about marijuana and it’s only the tip of the iceberg.

Another instance of racism affecting drug laws would be with cocaine. In the late 1800’s and early 1900’s, cocaine became popular among laborers. It was usually supplied to the workers by their employers. Cocaine was often supplied to black workers, who many employers believed were better physical workers; cocaine was thought to provide added strength and constitution and according to the Medical News, made black people “impervious to the extremes of heat and cold.” Keep in mind that cocaine was not just popular among black people. It was also popular among poorer white people. In some places it was cheaper to obtain than alcohol and had the added benefit of keeping people awake for long periods of time so they could work overtime.

When more and more people began to use cocaine, the media started reporting “epidemics.” These reports made sure to stress the “social threat” of cocaine over it’s adverse health effects. These hyperbolic reports made sure to emphasize the effect cocaine had on black people. For example, in 1901, the Atlanta Constitution reported that “Use of the drug [cocaine] among negroes is growing to an alarming extent.” The New York Times also reported that under the influence of cocaine, “sexual desires are increased and perverted … peaceful negroes become quarrelsome, and timid negroes develop a degree of ‘Dutch courage’ that is sometimes almost incredible.” Even a judge in Mississippi declared that supplying a “negro” with cocaine was more dangerous than injecting a dog with rabies.

These attitudes not only influenced drug law and policy but also led to increased violence against black people. In 1906, a major race riot led by white people erupted; it was sparked by reports of crimes committed by black ‘cocaine fiends.’  White-led, race riots spawning from reports of black people under the influence of cocaine were not uncommon. Police in the South widely adopted the use of a heavier caliber handguns so as to better stop a cocaine-crazed black person – believed to be empowered with super-human strength. Another dangerous myth perpetuated amongst police was that cocaine imbued black people with tremendous accuracy with firearms and therefore police were better advised to shoot first in questionable circumstances.

Now, take time to read those last two sentences again. Police officers in the south, and pretty much all over the country, still do those things to this day. When officers enter black neighborhoods they’re a lot more likely to shoot first and ask questions later. The weapons they use can, at times, be extremely over powered. When they do raids or drug busts in black neighborhoods, the weapons, armor, and vehicles they use make it look like they’re entering a war zone and not simply arresting people. Now, they may not list those stereotypes as the reason they do what they do but I can tell you with absolute certainty that those stereotypes are the basis for their actions.

Eventually, public opinion came to rest against the cocaine user. Criminality was commonly believed to be a natural result of cocaine use. While the historical reality of cocaine’s effect on violence and crime is difficult to disentangle from inflamed perceptions, it does appear that public opinion was swayed by the image of the violent, cocaine-crazed fiend and pushed over the edge by a few violent episodes. It was an image of the cocaine-user that carried acute racial overtones.

The federal government soon stepped in and instituted a national labeling requirement for cocaine and cocaine-containing products through the Food and Drug Act of 1906. The next impactful federal regulation was the Harrison Narcotics Tax Act of 1914. While it’s often seen as the start of prohibition, the act itself was not actually a prohibition on cocaine, but setup a regulatory and licensing regime instead. The Harrison Act did not recognize addiction as a treatable condition and therefore the therapeutic use of cocaine, heroin or morphine to such individuals was outlawed. As of today, cocaine is listed as a Schedule II Controlled Substance under the Controlled Substances Act.

If you need another colorful example of racism and drug laws, take a look at the history of Opium. It is filled to the brim with racism and colonialism.

As far as the modern war on drugs goes, it is in my opinion nothing but institutionalized racism wrapped up in a new blanket. Two articles that explain this quite well can be found here and here.

(via masteradept)