fozmeadows

fozmeadows:

misandristqueen:

Obstetric Lie #81 - An Episiotomy is Better than a Tear

heartandsoulmidwifery:

birthculture:

Isn’t it simply mind boggling that somebody would say that an episiotomy (a cut, with scissors) into a mother’s vagina is BETTER than a natural tear?  Who made that up?  Obviously not somebody who has actually HAD their vagina cut with scissors. 


Oh, but people DO say it.  “A straight cut is better than a jagged tear.”  “An episiotomy is so much easier to stitch up than a tear.”  “Babies are so big, you are going to tear anyway, might as well make it faster.” 

Ahh….to be a woman in this day and age and to accept so readily the inevitability of our own body’s failure.  Well, I for one don’t accept it.  It defies logic to say that it is better to cut a stretchable part of the body than to simply let it tear (or even better- NOT TEAR!  Yes, this too can happen!)”

This brings up something. Last year we we’re learning how to sew an episiotomy wound, because as future midwives we have to know how to do it.

The professor who was with us used the same words: An episiotomy is better than a tear.

We were practicing on models, and when I finished with my work, I called the professor (who is also a doctor and works in the delivery room) to see if I did well.

 She looked at it and said: Well, it’s okay, but it doesn’t have to be so nice. We sew face wounds like that, and a vagina really doesn’t have to be sewed up so nice. 

I almost threw up there. How can a doctor say something like that? How can any kind - not only vaginal wound be sewed up too nice?

I had a lot of patients, and only some of them had an episiotomy, but it was really necessary and they all agreed with it. And none of my patients, who didn’t have an episiotomy, had a tear. None. 

Makes me want to go there, find that doctor and scream at her. 

This is kind of weird to hear; as someone currently 8 months pregnant, I’ve been told over and over by midwives - and have read in both baby books and parenting websites - that tearing is demonstrably better than an episiotomy, because a sharp cut won’t heal as easily. Is it possible this is a dissonance between American practice and practice elsewhere? Antenatal care in the UK is both free and heavily midwife-lead: all my regular checks have been conducted by midwives, the standard antenatal classes have been lead by midwives, I’ll be primarily cared for by midwives during labour, and once the kidlet is born, a midwife will visit me at home to make sure I’m coping, that the baby is well and that I’m not struggling to breastfeed. A doctor will probably be involved at some point during the actual birth, but in all probability, they won’t be my primary physician unless something goes wrong (which I obviously hope it doesn’t). But the point being, according to every single resource I’ve encountered thus far - all of which have been produced in either the UK or Australia - tearing has been cited as preferable to episiotomy because of both the reduced healing time and the fact that less damage is always better than more. So, yeah. Cultural differences within medicine, possibly? Or maybe I’ve just been surrounded by particularly good midwives.

The U.S. loves medical interventions for reasons that have nothing to do with health care. My first pregnancy was largely spent in Germany with a German OB & I had a huge culture shock when I came back to the U.S. Everything I had been told about pregnancy while I was abroad was rooted in it being a natural process requiring minimal intervention. Only in the U.S. was pregnancy a sickness that required treatment.

cabell
One experience that the overwhelming majority of maternity-home residents, and many white unwed mothers who did not make it to these homes, did share was the experience of giving their babies up for adoption. In the years before Roe v. Wade the experts were, again, pretty unanimously agreed that only the most profoundly disturbed unwed mothers kept their babies, instead of turning them over to a nice, middle-class man and woman who could provide the baby with a proper family. Leontine Young, the prominent authority on social casework theory in the are of unwed mothers, cautioned in 1953, “the caseworker has to clarify for herself the differences between the feelings of the normal [married] woman for her baby and the fantasy use of the child by the neurotic unmarried mother.”

For complex cultural, historical, and economic reasons, black, single pregnant women were not, in general, spurned by their families or shunted out of their communities into maternity homes, which usually had “white only” policies in any case. For the most part, black families accepted the pregnancy and made a place for the new mother and child. As one Chicago mother of a single black pregnant teenager said at the time, “It would be immortal to place the baby [for adoption]. That would be throwing away your own flesh and blood.” In contrast to the very large percentage of white girls and women who gave up their babies for adoption, about nine out of ten blacks kept theirs. In a postwar New York study, 96 percent of blacks keeping their babies reported deep satisfaction with this decision eighteen months later. Yet welfare and social caseworkers persisted for years in their claims that the only reason why blacks kept their babies was that no one would want them.

Social workers and other human service professionals claimed repeatedly that black single pregnancy was the product of family and community disorganization. Yet in comparing the family and community responses and blacks and whites to out-of-wedlock pregnant and childbearing, it is striking how the black community organized itself to accommodate mother and child while the white community was totally unwilling and unable to do so. The white community simply organized itself to expel them Still, black girls and women who became pregnant while single faced a forceful array of prejudices and policies threatening to the well-being of poor, minority, single mothers and their children.

Rickie Solinger, Wake Up Little Susie: Single Pregnancy and Race Before Roe v. Wade

I’ve barely started this book and already have a bunch of passages marked.

(via thecurvature)

peaceful-protest
peaceful-protest:

notesonascandal:

meme-spot:

First World Problems - “The New Generation” 
http://connorhewins.tumblr.com/
The Meme Spot

OK. This one is inappropriate. If that child is pregnant, it means somebody raped her. I know this blog is a humor blog, but I have to say that child rape & sexual abuse isn’t funny. 

The point is to show that it’s becoming a fad for younger and younger girls to be pregnant. Girls in my sisters middle school 11-13 are having babies, a few don’t know who the fathers are. The point is to show an overly young girl because that makes people pay attention. Calm down.

Shut up. Really, just be quiet & go look at the stats for teen pregnancy, then look at the ages of the fathers. Your anecdata & reality have only a passing acquaintance. Statutory rape laws exist for a reason.

peaceful-protest:

notesonascandal:

meme-spot:

First World Problems - “The New Generation” 

http://connorhewins.tumblr.com/

The Meme Spot

OK. This one is inappropriate. If that child is pregnant, it means somebody raped her. I know this blog is a humor blog, but I have to say that child rape & sexual abuse isn’t funny. 

The point is to show that it’s becoming a fad for younger and younger girls to be pregnant. Girls in my sisters middle school 11-13 are having babies, a few don’t know who the fathers are. The point is to show an overly young girl because that makes people pay attention. Calm down.

Shut up. Really, just be quiet & go look at the stats for teen pregnancy, then look at the ages of the fathers. Your anecdata & reality have only a passing acquaintance. Statutory rape laws exist for a reason.

thestoutorialist

My MIL has no impulse control for baby clothes.

cabell:

Not that I’m complaining.

She texted me last week from a Carter’s that was having an end-of-year sale, asking if there was anything we needed; I said that more fleece and layering pieces would be good.  So yesterday we got this GIANT BOX of 3-6 month clothes, mostly leggings and long-sleeved/long-legged fleece pieces, with a couple of little jackets.  They’re mostly pretty cute (I love the animal print fleeces, naturally), and I am now considerably less worried that AJ will freeze.

I am probably going to have to do a baby fashion blog.  You knew this was coming.

I routinely tell people that my MIL has the only JC Penney black card in existence. They get in the kid’s clothing section & can’t stop buying things. It’s amazing.

cabell

cabell:

notesonascandal:

UCLA obstetrician and gynecologist Dr. Michael Lu believes that for many women of color, racism over a life time, not just during the nine months of pregnancy, increases the risk of preterm delivery. To improve birth outcomes, Lu argues, we must address the conditions that impact women’s health not just when they become pregnant but from childhood, adolescence and into adulthood.

This video is a Web-exclusive supplement to “When the Bough Breaks,” Episode 2 of “UNNATURAL CAUSES: Is Inequality Making Us Sick?” This ground-breaking documentary series looks at how the social, economic and physical environments in which we are born, live, and work profoundly affect our longevity and health. The series broadcast nationally on PBS in spring 2008, and can be bought on DVD from California Newsreel, www.newsreel.org 

Visit www.unnaturalcauses.org to learn more.

Here’s a clip from the documentary I was talking about a couple of days ago.

notime4yourshit

Kymberly Wimberly: The McGehee valedictorian tells her story

notime4yourshit:

Kymberly Wimberly, McGehee valedictorian, 2011.

It was a long haul to the top for Kymberly Wimberly.

Kymberly had been a great student all her life. She and her co-valedictorian had known each other since 2nd grade. The two were part of a clique of high achievers, all racing to the top to be number one in their class.

Both opted to enter the Honor’s track when they started at McGehee Secondary school in the 8th grade. They enrolled in Algebra 1, instantly giving them an edge over other honor students who waited until the 9th grade to take that course.

Kymberly was also an all-star. Not only did she balance a full course load and come home with A’s in every class except one, but she was also on the basketball team, she played an instrument in the band, ran track, and was active in several clubs.

Towards the end of her sophomore year she learned she made the cheerleading team and was picked for the basketball team for the second time.

Then she got pregnant.

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