Esoterica's avatar

Esoterica

sourcedumal
Not only is this word steeped in a history of racial oppression and violence, we must never forget that racial oppression and violence are still occurring. White women – and beyond that anyone that is not black, including Yoko Ono and John Lennon – are not the people who should be making the decisions on how to use this word or how to change its meaning if that is something that people want to do. Many black women have denounced any use of this word and we support them in this.

SlutWalk Toronto’s response to the bullshit SlutWalk NYC has wrought.

This line here is indeed the most important part, because too many non black folks seem to think that because they aren’t white, they can pull anti-black bullshit with and everything is all cool. No, assholes. It’s not. YOU are not black, therefore you have ZERO say in how we reclaim ourselves. Period. I don’t give a fuck about the parallels, I don’t give a fuck about how your people were oppressed by white folks too. The black experiences is NOT YOURS. And to appropriate it for your nonsense makes you an ENEMY.

(via sourcedumal)

daniellemertina

Nigger

strugglingtobeheard:

daniellemertina:

Let’s understand what this word means.

It means consumed for labor, killed without concern, worthless, a caricature rather than an individual. It has meant enslaved, lynched, raped, and just slightly above a monkey according to evolution. It has meant no money, jobs, or opportunities for you.

It has meant watch while I rape your mother, sisters, and daughters. And don’t even look at me the wrong way or I’ll kill you afterwards.

It has meant look at a white woman and get hung in a tree. Get castrated while still alive. Get put on postcards. Your death commemorated in the name of preserving a real woman’s purity.

Today, it means being persecuted by the legal system. It means being systematically placed so that you will always be a part of the 99% (actually part of the very bottom of that 99% but still made to be silent). It means living in a system that is purposely constructed so that you will exist at its bottom. Not because you had the wrong major in college or got a bad GPA but because of who you innately are. It means being denied a quality education because the government does not care about the schools where a majority of your kind lives.

It means, that if you speak too loudly or too differently or wear the wrong kind of clothes you’ll be labeled ghetto which will impact your opportunities. It means having to walk on egg shells so that the wrong people (the important people who don’t look like you but may give you a chance at a living) won’t call you ghetto.

It means being labeled as angry and irrational when you complain about any of this.

I don’t want to be a nigger. Even black is a social construct which semantically puts me at a disadvantage but I’ll deal with that. But I don’t want to be a nigger.

But I am a nigger. I am always a nigger except when I’m surrounded by people who are also considered niggers. Very rarely, under any other circumstances can I be an individual human being.

Therefore, being a woman is not being a nigger. In fact, certain women have directly benefited from the existence of the nigger label.

I really don’t want to write about this anymore. It seems silly that the problematic nature of that SlutWalk sign even needs to be discussed. It seems like it should have been something one silly, racist person did and that everybody else should have understood that it was unacceptable and wrong.

I keep feeling like if I become more and more articulate on the matter that everybody will understand what seems obvious to me and many other black women which is why I keep writing.

But I guess not.

Ignorance in tandem with internalized superiority predicated upon race cannot be eradicated unless the person makes a personal decision to reevaluate the way they think. I can’t do that. Nobody else can do that. It’s all on them.

So I swear I won’t write anything else on this specific matter.

Very raw, very true. I honestly feel like ghetto has become the new covert way of saying nigger without saying it but you know. Glad you wrote this.

afrolez

Thank you, SlutWalk, for posting the piece I wrote for Crunk Feminist Collective this past week. The willful ignorance of so many commenters in this thread, who want the right to use the n-word, for I know not what reason, disgusts me and offends me. I say that as both an African American person, who has in fact been called the n-word by white folks, multiple times. And I’m only 30, which means that those slurs happened long after the Civil Rights movement was over. By contrast, I’ve never been called slut. Even still, I stand in solidarity with the SlutWalk movement.

But I stand in disgust at the racism that keeps rearing its ugly head. The sign in question is only the most obvious instance. I also say with certainty, based on my expertise as a Ph.D. in American Studies, with a concentration in African American and Women’s Studies, that white use of this word is offensive and should not occur. (As if one really needed a Ph.D. to say that. :-/)

I also know that that expertise doesn’t matter at all to those folks invested in defending this privilege based on the 1st amendment. I mean, I defend your right to engage in ignorant hateful speech all you want, but I call into question your commitment to social justice if you do so.

To suggest that sexism and rape matter more than racism is to fundamentally not understand the positionality of women of color who deal with racism and sexism at exactly the same time. To ask us to put aside racism for the larger cause of sexism is an act of white privilege that bespeaks the utter ignorance that many white folks still have about Black people generally and Black women in particular. For the record, I will not excuse racism in the feminist movement in order to stand in solidarity with anti- rape activism. I will not do it, because rape is no more a threat to my daily existence than racism is. I will not do it because I shouldn’t have to.

I don’t put up with racist knuckleheads anymore than I put up with sexist knuckleheads, and I certainly wouldn’t show up to a march that claims to care about making the world safer for me, when their are women who show up there with the privilege of not thinking about how their careless uses of language make the space less safe and invoke a history of raping Black women that was done to us because we are both Black and women. To not acknowledge this is to forget the very ways in which rape has been experienced by Black women historically.

I certainly don’t expect white men to get that, and I do hope the white men in this thread who are vehemently (and subtly) asking for and defending the right to use the n-word see the historical irony of that position. But since white women claim to care about the universal woman struggle (whatever the hell that is), then I expect y’all to get a specific clue about the ways in which your racism is divisive and my/our outrage and disengagement completely warranted…” ~ Brittney Cooper ~

CLICK HERE TO READ CFC PIECE

CLICK HERE TO READ THE SLUTWALK THREAD (on Facebook)

Great response.

Trigger warning on the page because it’s actually making me feel physically sick.  I can’t believe how racist people are.  It’s fucked up. 

(via genderfuked)

Reading the Slutwalk FB page just proves all over again that this is a performance of progressiveness, not actual progressiveness in action. These people want to say they were part of something big (see folks who claim marching during the Civil Rights Movement makes them not racist now, no matter what they say about *those people*), but they have no interest in actual change for everyone. Just themselves.

(via theoceanandthesky)

theoceanandthesky
but i’ll just say this: be upset with me if you want to - but don’t use me as the pinnacle of black women cos i don’t speak for anybody but myself. i speak for me because i don’t see a representation of me in any of those photos. i don’t see a representation of a fat black girl who just wanted some justice. i don’t see a representation of a sex worker still walking the streets who deserves safety too. i don’t see a representation of a mexican woman who is being assaulted by her husband but can’t report it because she’ll be deported if she does. i don’t see a representation of black kids who are molested every day of their lives in a foster home. i don’t see any of that in slutwalk. i don’t see a representation of the 80 year old woman who is being sexually assaulted at the nursing facility where she lives who can’t tell anyone because her entire family has abandoned her and no one who works there gives a damn anyway.

i see a bunch of white girls, 30 and under, walking around half naked, spreading one clear and very concise message: look at me, i’m sandra dee. look at me. look at me. look at me. no one else, just me.

all i ever wanted to know from slutwalk was: what about the rest of us?

peech on slutwalk nyc (taken from here)

“What about the rest of us?”

How about you stand the fuck up and say something FOR YOURSELF?

To be very clear, I DO understand where she’s coming from with this, but it is so full of “I’m not white therefore I am a victim.” that it HURTS. Yes, some people cannot stand up and fight for themselves, like the Mexican woman mentioned above. However others can, and even those who cannot CAN do something to get out of their situation. You are not a victim of the world. Get the fuck up and DO SOMETHING about it.

(On a side note, I do not support slutwalk. I think the entire concept is ridiculous. If you want to protest rape culture, you can do so without looking like a skank.)

(via idontgiveafuckwhatdisbitchnameis)

imma need you to eat a dick. really.

(via peecharrific)

Let me just cosign Peech and add…

(via peechingtonmariejust)

theoceanandthesky
but i’ll just say this: be upset with me if you want to - but don’t use me as the pinnacle of black women cos i don’t speak for anybody but myself. i speak for me because i don’t see a representation of me in any of those photos. i don’t see a representation of a fat black girl who just wanted some justice. i don’t see a representation of a sex worker still walking the streets who deserves safety too. i don’t see a representation of a mexican woman who is being assaulted by her husband but can’t report it because she’ll be deported if she does. i don’t see a representation of black kids who are molested every day of their lives in a foster home. i don’t see any of that in slutwalk. i don’t see a representation of the 80 year old woman who is being sexually assaulted at the nursing facility where she lives who can’t tell anyone because her entire family has abandoned her and no one who works there gives a damn anyway.

i see a bunch of white girls, 30 and under, walking around half naked, spreading one clear and very concise message: look at me, i’m sandra dee. look at me. look at me. look at me. no one else, just me.

all i ever wanted to know from slutwalk was: what about the rest of us?

peech on slutwalk nyc (taken from here)

so part of the thing about not speaking for people is to enable them to speak for themselves. the question becomes why arent the folks you pointed out as not being represented being represented? obviously the straight/cis/white representation of things cannot account for these array of things. its not their job to hold up signs about the mexican woman who will be deported— they cannot do the job that someone who is more intimately involved with the realities of deportation and sexual assault can do.

so

1- why arent these representations taking place, beyond ‘because white people dont know how to do shit’

and

2- how do we encourage these people/related people/etc to represent these scenarios?

and 3- unless someone is coercively leaving you out of the loop, how can we enable a coalition *with* the rest of us?

(via weexist-weresist)

Women who are at risk already can’t engage in performance activism without consequences. Aside from any cultural considerations (and there are many), & potential legal ramifications, there is also a completely different level of support for women who are considered unrapeable by dint of skin color. We’re still being coerced into proving our humanity so that our pain can be recognized as something besides porn for the masses who think we can’t feel anything.

(via praxis-makesperfect-deactivated)

peechingtonmariejust

i understand ppl are going to be mad with me.

peecharrific:

and i understand ppl are going to think, “is peech ever going to be happy? or is everything slutwalk does going to be wrong?”

i’m just here to say: slutwalk can do whatever they want. but there’s nothing they’re going to say or do that’s going to make me say, “hey! now i feel extra safe! i support it!” because i don’t and i won’t.

from a week of them patently ignoring every effort that individual black WoC (who were/are critics) made to connect with them, to the deletion of photos with no explanation, to abuse and trolling from members of their leadership, to phony apologies meant only to pacify, to demands that we meet them in new york at their meeting if we want to be heard, to them only publishing letters and communication from people who are in their group, to suzyx singling me out and saying i was “articulate” (paraphrase), to them posting a photo of an obviously chemically affected or inebriated sex worker covered in semen with the word slut scrawled across her forehead and the stamp “Max Hardcore” in the corner. All of that. Slutwalk is not for me - I know that.

i’m just a regular black girl - nothing fancy, no extra words or phrases attached to me - just a black girl who knows that slutwalk doesn’t give a damn about anything but the people in places of leadership who want their faces on television screens and to become a household name - and anything that gets in the way of that is a distraction. your safety? distraction. racism? distraction. dignity? distraction. it is a distraction they do not have time for - and the only reason they’ve responded now is because it’s been a week and there’s no slowing down of the posts on their page or round the web outing them for the anti-black-woman outfit they are.

but i’ll just say this: be upset with me if you want to - but don’t use me as the pinnacle of black women cos i don’t speak for anybody but myself. i speak for me because i don’t see a representation of me in any of those photos. i don’t see a representation of a fat black girl who just wanted some justice. i don’t see a representation of a sex worker still walking the streets who deserves safety too. i don’t see a representation of a mexican woman who is being assaulted by her husband but can’t report it because she’ll be deported if she does. i don’t see a representation of black kids who are molested every day of their lives in a foster home. i don’t see any of that in slutwalk. i don’t see a representation of the 80 year old woman who is being sexually assaulted at the nursing facility where she lives who can’t tell anyone because her entire family has abandoned her and no one who works there gives a damn anyway.

i see a bunch of white girls, 30 and under, walking around half naked, spreading one clear and very concise message: look at me, i’m sandra dee. look at me. look at me. look at me. no one else, just me.

all i ever wanted to know from slutwalk was: what about the rest of us?

There is no space for the rest of us. No room for WOC that aren’t willing to ignore the racism inside Slutwalk. No room for girls who were pimped out as kids, or molested by family friends. No space for women for whom touch & sex are complicated. This is more about performance than activism.

afrolez

"Am I Troy Davis? A Slut?; or, What’s Troubling Me about the Absence of Reflexivity in Movements that Proclaim Solidarity

afrolez:

Sister/Comrade Stephanie Gilmore, who spoke at SlutWalk Philadelphia, is, to the best of my knowledge, one of the ONLY anti-racist White Feminists who has PUBLICLY SUPPORTED the IDEA/PREMISE of SlutWalk while PUBLICLY CHALLENGING its CURRENT RACIST REALITY.

With her FULL PERMISSION, I have re-posted the text of her essay so that people who are not on facebook will be able to read it in its entirety.

Am I Troy Davis? A Slut?; or, What’s Troubling Me about the Absence of Reflexivity in Movements that Proclaim Solidarityby Stephanie Gilmore

1.

On September 21, 2011, I joined hundreds of my friends and millions of people around the world to watch, through tears and in abject horror, as Troy Anthony Davis was executed by the State of Georgia. In the twenty years between Davis’ trial for the murder of police officer Mark McPhail and his execution, Davis maintained his innocence while witnesses recanted the testimony that sent Davis to death row. Despite conflicting testimonies and inadequate evidence, the state put aside lingering and longstanding doubt and instead, put Troy Anthony Davis to death.

On Facebook, Twitter, and other media outlets, I saw virtual and real friends declare that “I am Troy Davis.” They changed their profile pictures to a picture or image of Davis, or a black box, all in an attempt to articulate a sense of solidarity, a stand against the injustice of the prison industrial complex and a state thoroughly entrenched in the murder of a man who may not have committed the crime of murder. I agree wholeheartedly that the state was wrong in executing Mr. Davis and I grieve for his death as well as that of Officer McPhail. But in the weeks since Davis’s execution, I have been wondering if people really understand how and why Davis came to be murdered at the hands of the state. People insist that “I am Troy Davis,” but what does that mean?

In many ways, I am not Troy Davis. I am a middle-class, 40-something-year-old white woman. According to a 2008 Pew Center on the States report, one in 36 Hispanic adults is in prison in the United States. One in 15 Black adults is too, a statistic that includes one in 100 Black women and one in nine Black men, age 20-34.  Although one of my parents spent time in prison, and through incarceration joined the swelling ranks of 2.3 million imprisoned people and many more in the system of probation, halfway houses, and parole, I and my white peers do not face systemic racial injustice in the structures of imprisonment. And it does not begin or end with the prison system. Black children are suspended and expelled from school at 3 times the rate of white children. Racial discrimination in funding for education also affects children’s success in school, as cash-poor school districts are also overwhelmingly Black and Latino neighborhoods.  Schools have been and remain a pipeline to prison for many Black and Latino children, and generations of families, prison is a reality. One in 15 Black children currently has a parent in jail. People say that the system is broken, but I (along with others in the prison abolition movement) admit that the system is working exactly as it was set up to do. Can I really say, “I am Troy Davis” without giving serious consideration to the realities of racism in the prison industrial complex? Does that just become little more than the adoption of a slogan and a picture, without a real awareness of the racist realities of the prison industrial complex?

2.

On August 6, 2011, I joined Slut Walk Philadelphia. It was a beautiful day and hundreds of people moved through Center City to end up at City Hall, where even more gathered to speak out against sexual violence. I had been following Slut Walks with great delight because I see the people power in the sheer numbers of women and men who are fighting back against sexual violence.  So when I was asked to participate, and to stand with queer people of Color in a more racially inclusive Slut Walk than I had seen to date, I said “yes” because the fight to end sexual violence is my fight. And fighting against a culture that perpetuates and promotes rape; cheers on rapists; and diminishes, humiliates, and silences victims through law, education, and entertainment will demands knowledge that the system, again, is not broken. It is doing the very work it was constructed to do – sexual violence is a tool of ensuring white status quo. And if we are to end sexual violence, we must acknowledge how it operates.

I have struggled to accept a movement that does not acknowledge the very problematic word “slut” and how historically many women have not been able to shake the label of “slut.” I participated in the struggle – the movement as well as my own internal struggle – because I wanted to engage in, create, and sustain dialogue. Indeed, many criticize the apparent move to claim “slut” – how can you pick up something you’ve never been able to put down? Black women have been most vocal about the longer legacy of sexual violence done onto their bodies – often against the backdrop of slavery and colonialism — simply for being Black. But I continued to push into these bigger conversations and analyses. I listened and engaged when Crunk Feminist Collective challenged Slut Walks, when BlackWomen’s Blueprint issued their “Open Letter from Black Women to Slut Walk Organizers,” and when individual women of Color (and only women of Color) spoke publicly about racist actions within individual marches as well as racism within the larger movement. White women I know made private comments about different expressions of racism, but never spoke up to challenge individual actions or larger frameworks of analysis, leaving me to wonder “why?”

And then I saw the sign from Slut Walk NYC bearing the words “Women are the N*gger of the World.” I don’t care that the quotation is from John Lennon and Yoko Ono. I don’t care that the woman was asked to take down the sign – although I certainly do care that a woman of Color had to ask her to do so while white women moved around her, seemingly oblivious. I am angry when I continue to see so many white women defending it expressly or remaining complicit in silence, suggesting that “we” (what “we”?) need to focus on sexual violence first, as if it is unrelated to racism. And I wonder, can I really claim to be a part of the nascent Slut Walk movement without giving serious consideration to the realities of racism within very publicly identified facets of it? Can I be a part of it when so many women – my very allies and sisters in antiracist struggle – are set apart from it, or worse, set in perpetual opposition to it?

3.

My question is, how can we be in solidarity when we are not willing to be reflexive and to check ourselves, check each other, and be checked? Bernice Johnson Reagon acknowledged that coalition building is hard work, made even harder by people who come to coalition seeking to find a home. My sense, or perhaps one sense I have, is that many people came to the “I Am Troy Davis” momentum or the Slut Walk marches looking for a home, a place where they can sit back and feel comfortable in their hard (very hard!) work, and comforted by others who pat them on the head and tell them “good job.” This is not to dismiss genuine concern for the state of our world. Perhaps we’re all lonely, as the realities of social justice work have taken on different and palatable forms since WTO and 9/11. So many people are down for the immediate issue – the indefensible execution of Troy Davis, the indefensible perpetuation of sexual violence — and that matters. But I worry that many white people aren’t paying attention to the larger structures in place. They are not being reflexive about the realities of racism that undergird prison incarceration, death penalty, and sexual violence.

I am not Troy Davis; I never will be. A system built on the foundation of racism ensures that I will not confront the realities of prison incarceration in the same ways as Black and Latino people. I am a strong advocate against sexual violence, but I cannot fight in and for a movement that is not interested in the realities of racism and the ways that racism undergirds sexual violence, and instead so blindly employs racist language. (The “Occupy Wall Street” actions call for me again the realities of racism and its necessity within the existing structure of capitalism – and the insistence among white people that people of Color indulge a luxury of time and money to sit in with them is untenable and racist. Many others have pointed out that the language of “occupation” is inherently problematic because bodies and lands have been historically occupied, often through sexual violence and criminalization. The movement itself needs to be decolonized.) Even as I support openly the prison abolition movement, the end to sexual violence, and the uprooting of a socioeconomic system that ignores the 99%, I cannot do so without deep awareness of racism that is operating within and among these movements. It is my work as a white activist to speak to and be aware of these legacies and histories of racism. Women and men of Color need not be alone in the front lines of identifying racist action and reaction within the movement. Insisting that people of Color have a voice only when it comes to identifying racism perpetuates, rather than alleviates racism. As I look at the actions of some people within these movements, I am reminded again that the racism of the supposed left is even more damaging and hurtful than the naked racism of the right.

If we are to work together in solidarity, we must do so reflexively, conscious of our actions and the potential outcomes before we act. This is not a call to focus on criticism and self-reflection to the point that we are inactive. That is unproductive, to be sure. But it is a call to be mindful and vigilant about racist action and reaction, to come to terms with the fact that we must do the work of understanding racist underpinnings of prison incarceration, the death penalty, and sexual violence if we are to make significant progress. Undoing racism must be at the core of our collective work across movements. To echo Dr. Reagon’s statement, we need to be honest and ask if we really want people of Color or if we’re just looking for ourselves with a little color to it. So much of the movement work, as it stands, seems to be looking for a little color, when we need to be exploring the realities of racism as part of the problem, not an additive to the “real” issue. In the absence of reflexivity about the structural forces that are keeping us apart, we will never be able to engage in real coalition work that will be required if we are to take seriously our goals of ending sexual violence and the death penalty. These movements as they are going now may continue, but they will not do so in my name and certainly not without my consent.

So no, I am not Troy Davis. I am not a slut. I am not an occupier of Wall Street or any street. The fights are my fights, but the current methods and analyses are not mine. I cannot sit by and listen to people debate the efficacy of the death penalty without understanding that it is the larger complex of incarceration and the “elementary-to-penitentiary” path that tracks and traps Black and Latino youth by design. I am done with the handwringing and “white lady tears” of so many white women who keep defending racist approaches and actions and, at times, respond with violence when confronted and challenged. Such behavior only reinforces the fact that these movement spaces as they are currently defined are not safe. My friend, colleague, and sister-in-spirit Aishah Shahidah Simmons said it best when she commented, “It’s sobering to observe how White solidarity is taking precedence over principled responses…. ” Sobering, indeed. I will most assuredly fight to end the prison industrial complex, sexual violence, and unbridled capitalism, but I will do so from a space that centers the racist roots of incarceration, criminal “justice,” capitalism, and sexual violence.  Thankfully, those spaces already exist – even if they remain peripheral in the mainstream media (and in much of what is left of the lefty media). But it is time to pivot the center. Without reflexive analysis of racism and coalition work grounded in antiracist movement, we miss the real root of the problem as well as real opportunities to create change.

___________________________
Stephanie Gilmore is a feminist activist and assistant professor of the women’s and gender studies department at Dickinson College. For the 2011-12 academic year, she is a postdoctoral fellow in women’s studies at Duke University. She is completing “Groundswell: Grassroots Feminist Activism in Postwar America” (Routledge, 2012) and has started a new research project on how students negotiate sexual violence on residential college campuses in the United States.

(via madamethursday)

blackamazon

Open Letter to Slutwalk

notforyoutobreak:

blackamazon:

Dear Slutwalk and all of it’s supporters,

   Good luck I mean that ,with whatever you intend to do.  However with Shira Tennant now just LYING in print , it is obvious we can not continue to hold a dialogue about this..  It’s not just a disagreement. It’s not minor. It’s resource and class violence that sadly is often the outcome of these “ movements”. Things are being made up , in hopes of “ strengthening your movement” . I am a woman and I am all to familiar with be called a N*gg*r and the only thing I have learned form it is fear.

An apology actually hasn’t been made.  “ We’re sorry that sign made it into union square” isn’t an apology. We’re sorry that we created an atmosphere that any one thought that was okay is an apology. It is disheartening and quite honestly disrespectful to pretend you have no idea what critiques you are responding ESPECIALLY on tumblr where they are linked at the bottom of your page. It is not an opportunity to show her it is unacceptable , WHEN YOU WILL NOT SAY THOSE WORDS TO HER. When you allow the behavior that has gone on in your name to continue without public response in the forums it has happened.

At no part of your “ apology” have you stated, that what women have done in your name, the slander and disrespect of black women is wrong. At no point have you intervened to say that whatever we stand for , we also stand for women being allowed to express themselves as individuals, without fear of reprisals not limited to insults, appropriation, and lying. But the women you choose continually to ignore and allow to be disrespected are not part of big name organizations, so it seems by your behavior they are expendable.

I am truly glad for you that it is healing “ work” . I am truly please for you that this is something you can get over. But for me a woman who has BEEN assaulted with that word hung over me, it is not that easy. It is triggering, it is the skin I am in when I am demeaned. It is the word yelled at women in my family, and my ancestry when they are raped , and instead of treating it with that gravity, it is being treated as a PR flub.

For all your talk not once have you acknowledged that the people who have challenged you are feeling real pain. You have yet to extend the solidarity of that respect , allowing comment upon comment and word upon word to cast these women,  which as you should know sadly ARE survivors of the sexual trauma you claim to be against , be portrayed as do nothings, villains,  and whatever spewed forth from the mouths of this group you love so much.

From the inception of Slutwalk women of ALL backgrounds have expressed fear at the high handed , unexamined way this has been conducted, fearing that the work put forth would end up alienating and divisive. We hoped it would be merely structural , instead these women , black women especially were treated over and over again, by that sign, and by the cruel and unkind “discussion” that followed to the visceral nature of those failures.

Now the only thing you have to offer is the hope that we will put ourselves into  hostile unwelcoming situations where we have been guaranteed no comfort, support, or basic respect, to do the work you have so obviously avoided doing and continue to avoid. With no assurance or parity, clarity , or reciprocity. So you may grow and we may hurt for your growth.

As a survivor and speaking with many of the survivors that word has jarred and cut so deeply, we require a movement of vision and love. That moves beyond reactionary measures, and proactively envisions, places of care, support and growth for us ALL. When someone can NOT or WILL NOT extend a very simple apology for that most hurtful of phrases, they assure me that their space is NOT the space , I can see that happening.

Thankfully there is more than one way to work towards reproductive justice and there are many places where many of the voices you still seek to drown out and erase are doing that work. 

May we get to that goal where ALL women feel safe and supported and free in their choices to maintain the safety of their bodies, minds and spirits. You have made it obvious that your space does not and truly does not seek to include me and those like me but I hope it still works for you.

Bolded emphasis made by me. 

I’ve been seeing posts about this all week (haven’t been really participating in too much discussion though).  I recall seeing one where some white women, who were still denying the racism happening in slutwalk, said that black women just don’t know what it’s like to be a survivor of sexual assault, or they never speak about it or work against it.  Which is a load of bullshit, and it’s just more exclusion.  Exclusion done in one of the most hurtful ways.  White feminists, if your response to criticism of racism is to erase and minimize black women’s experiences and efforts (which you probably don’t know squat about), then no, I won’t waste my time with you.  Neither should any other WoC.

Some similar things have been thrown at me by white feminists I dared to criticize when I finally got a clue and sensed something was messed up with white feminism.  If black women talk about race and their experiences with their oppression (where white women benefit), or if they dare point out that white feminists’ racism, then they’re often turned anti-feminist in white women’s eyes.  And that gives white women an excuse to exclude, demean, and erase, trying to just wear out black women so that they will submit themselves to a hostile environment where white women benefit from their pain.  If that’s not white supremacy and abuse, I don’t know what is.

Reasons why I don’t call myself a feminist anymore….

Bolding mine. I can’t fuck with the kind of people who say this dumb shit & then want to bleat about sisterhood & solidarity. Mammy issues make my slapping hand itch.

(via the-original-dtwps)

karnythia

Dumb Things White People Say: sourcedumal: liquornspice: karnythia: Hold on, people are claiming...

peecharrific:

sourcedumal:

liquornspice:

karnythia:

Hold on, people are claiming that Slutwalk’s critics have never talked about sexual violence. Really? Umm, yeah I need to get off the internet. Because this ish has my pressure up. I’ve been writing about sexual violence for years. YEARS. And I…

Where are the WoC writers who can get a blog up on huffpo? I’d LOVE LOVE LOVE to see something refuting that shit like FUCK. that “article” is ridiculous. It was basically a call out blog to start some shit.

“STOP FIGHTING! i’m gonna start a fight to tell you bchs to stop fighting!”

I…might be able to get something up on Huff Po. Let me talk to a couple of people this weekend. I hate the idea of giving them free content, but this is important.

(via peechingtonmariejust)

emilylhauserinmyhead.wordpress.com
[n*****] belongs to some of us, but it does not belong to me. It has 250 years of the whip in it, and the slaughter of children, and the destruction of families, and the constant assault on an entire people’s very humanity.

Emily Hauser, “John Lennon, Rick Perry, and words that are not ours” (via livingartist)

(via polerin)