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Esoterica

badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista
Playbill program for Marilyn Rockafellow and Calvin Levels in Calvin Levels, Nan-Lyn Nelson and Pam Potillo, in TV version of Michael Beach, as the character Calvin Jefferson,

deafmuslimpunx:

“Open Admissions” (written by Shirley Lauro, published in 1979, premiered on Broadway in 1984)

This is a play about race and speech (speaking/writing) in higher education. I only had the One Act version play available. “Open Admissions” has three versions (Two Act, One Act, and Teleplay). I read the One Act version which was available in Political Playwriting (a book I am currently reading). I will discuss the One Act version.

It’s funny I came across this play, because there had been a lot of discussion on Tumblr about speech, racism, and level of education. The notion is that if you speak “white,” you are perceived as respectable, well-educated and more intelligent. If you speak “black,” you are perceived as stupid, ghetto, dangerous, and ignorant. There were discussions on Tumblr about upper-class white academics who speak in such academic mumbo-jumbo jargon, that their words are inaccessible to folks everywhere who are not well-versed or well-read. I have provided links below if you want to read.

Links:

“African American English”

“Language is Power”

“If you cannot communicate your ideas…”

“How can you be damn intellectual if…”

“I really despise academics who…”

“Open Admissions” One-Act version only has two characters: Professor Ginny (well-educated white woman and Shakespeare scholar who holds B.A, M.A and Ph.D) and Calvin Jefferson (a 18 years old black male who just entered college three months ago). The play is set in New York City, at an un-named New York City public college.

Calvin has just been granted open admission into college and he is determined to make a good life for himself. He wants to meet with Dr. Ginny (who teaches Speech and English) and asks her one question: why does she always give him a B, and nothing else? Not even a C or F or an A? He asks her how he can improve himself and learn more things. He is determined to improve his writing and speaking skills, and learn new skills. He wants to be graded harshly so that he can be motivated to do better.

Professor Ginny, at first, is dismissive toward him and insists that he did a “good job.” He does not believe her, and for good reason. He says that he’s messed up a lot in class, and doesn’t deserve a B. He also points out that the other black students in class all receive a B, while white students get graded differently. He also brings up another issue: when the students were assigned to perform Shakespeare scenes, Dr. Ginny made all the black students perform scenes out of Othello or other scenes with black characters, while white students had plenty of choices to choose from different Shakespeare plays. Calvin asks her why black students had no choice in what scene to perform. In other words: why are black students expected to perform black characters, while white students could play ANY character, regardless of race? In response to this, Dr. Ginny acts as if Calvin is being crazy.

Dr. Ginny reminds me of racist white liberals who claim they see no race, and that race shouldn’t matter. She doesn’t realize that her internalized racism pushes down black students and she ignores them, while she encourages and motivates white students to do better and improve their skills. She doesn’t care about black students and doesn’t try to push them harder. She just gives them a “B” and says “good job,” while she encourages white students to do better.

As a deaf person of color, I’ve remember this happening too many times in public and private school, both deaf and hearing. In college, I was required to take certain class to fulfill my B.A degree for Theatre. I had to either take 18th century British or 18th century American literature class. I thought I’d take 18th century British literature, because I was born in the UK and I was familiar with British literature. Unfortunately, the class was difficult and inaccessible to me, and the professor always spoke in jargon crap. He made NO efforts to have interesting, lively discussions on 18th century British literature. I was failing and doing poorly. That professor even asked to meet me in private and he told me to consider dropping the class. He brought up my deafness as a possible obstacle to doing well in school. I got deeply offended and angry that he thought I was failing because I’m deaf! No, I was failing the class because he was doing a SHITTY JOB teaching 18th century British literature to us. I was a lover of British literature, yet I was failing.

In the play, Calvin becomes frustrated with the lack of progress in their conversation. Dr. Ginny continues being dismissive toward him and he becomes upset. He asks Dr. Ginny to TEACH him. How can he improve his grades and do better in class? Teach me, teach me. TEACH ME!!! he yells at her, that’s YOUR JOB! YOU ARE A TEACHER. TEACH ME!

Dr. Ginny then relents and she sits him down, and then criticizes his speech. Instead of teaching him, she CRITICIZES him and corrects his speech. Calvin has “street” speech. Dr. Ginny says that people are perceived by others based on how they speak. Calvin is shocked by her patronizing attitude toward him.

It is a teacher’s job to teach, motivate, educate, and give constructive criticism. It is not the teacher’s job to constantly criticize and tear down the student. Or in this case, to whitewash the (black) student and try to teach him how to speak “white.”

Dr. Ginny does not make any efforts to teach Calvin to write and read better. Instead, she just criticizes and corrects his speech. He’s sitting there, dumbfounded by her paternalistic, white-privileged attitude.

During the play, Dr. Ginny bemoans about how she’s being overworked and hasn’t been promoted to a better teaching position despite having teached at the college for over 12 years and holds a Ph.D in Shakespeare studies. At this, Calvin retorts “and I’m supposed to feel sorry for you?” He is an eighteen years old black male who is trying to turn his life around and yet he’s expected to feel sorry for a privileged white woman who holds a Ph.D in Shakespeare studies and teaches at a New York City college!

Open Admissions (One-Act version) is a great example of white privilege and internalized racism in white academia. It’s a good play, and I would like an opportunity to direct this play onstage if I could.

(read my other play reviews)

(via crankyskirt)

educationforliberation

In 1936 a Harlem postal worker and activist named Victor H. Green decided to develop a guide that would help African Americans travel throughout the country in a safe and comfortable manner. The Negro Motorist Green Book (also called The Negro Travelers’ Green Book), often simply known as The Green Book, identified places that welcomed black people during an era when Jim Crow laws and de facto segregation made it difficult for them to travel domestically without fear of racial backlash.The Green Book listed businesses and places of interest such as nightclubs, beauty salons, barbershops, gas stations and garages that catered to black road-trippers. For almost three decades, travelers could request (for just 10 cents’ postage) and receive a guide from Green. Eventually the guide expanded to encompass information about Canada and Mexico.Like users of today’s popular recommendation sites such as TripAdvisor, travelers collected information during their journeys, which they shared with Green and his team of editors. The data were then incorporated into future editions. “Historically, The Green Book falls in line with the underreported activism of black postal workers and the heightened awareness of driving while black in certain regions of the country,” says Robert Smith, associate professor of African-American and civil rights history at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. “Although many think of this book in historical terms, the challenges facing black travelers then resonate with black travelers now, particularly as it relates to racial profiling and stop-and-frisk laws.”
read more.

In 1936 a Harlem postal worker and activist named Victor H. Green decided to develop a guide that would help African Americans travel throughout the country in a safe and comfortable manner. The Negro Motorist Green Book (also called The Negro Travelers’ Green Book), often simply known as The Green Book, identified places that welcomed black people during an era when Jim Crow laws and de facto segregation made it difficult for them to travel domestically without fear of racial backlash.

The Green Book listed businesses and places of interest such as nightclubs, beauty salons, barbershops, gas stations and garages that catered to black road-trippers. For almost three decades, travelers could request (for just 10 cents’ postage) and receive a guide from Green. Eventually the guide expanded to encompass information about Canada and Mexico.

Like users of today’s popular recommendation sites such as TripAdvisor, travelers collected information during their journeys, which they shared with Green and his team of editors. The data were then incorporated into future editions. “Historically, The Green Book falls in line with the underreported activism of black postal workers and the heightened awareness of driving while black in certain regions of the country,” says Robert Smith, associate professor of African-American and civil rights history at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. “Although many think of this book in historical terms, the challenges facing black travelers then resonate with black travelers now, particularly as it relates to racial profiling and stop-and-frisk laws.”

read more.

darkgirlswirl

dassitright:

thought i was done with this but that one line really got to me.

where did we as africans ever say that we don’t want those who share our ancestors? have you been to africa and seen how african americans are treated? have you? because a lot of them have the red carpet rolled out for them and are treated much better than someone like myself. in a country like south africa, black americans are treasured by the white population here.

if there’s anything i’ve learnt from travelling through africa it’s that in africa, no one cares that you’re africa. yes, we have identity issues and african unity still remains a forgotten concept that was birthed in post-colonial africa through pan-african thought, but swiftly died with the passing of its ideological founders.

enslavement did not just happen to african descended people living in the americas. believe it or not, that shit affected those of us living on the continent too. you don’t think we weren’t displaced too? you don’t think that our ancestry isn’t the slightest bit fucked from that? not to mention the arab slave trade that came before and decimated much of the culture of east and north africa. yeah, believe it or not, the arab faces of north africa aren’t the indigenous faces of that part of the continent. sometimes, considering the barabic erasure

yes, i may have the comfort of knowing that i am ‘yoruba’ but even that gets fuzzy when i try and piece together my ancestry beyond my grandparents. i have questions of complex identity issues to. such as, how come (before european colonialism) my father’s side of the family practiced islam as opposed to yoruba spirtuality (which has resulted in me not knowing ANYTHING about this part of my history because non-African religions have taken precedence over our own)? at what point did they convert and for what reasons? are there explanations, beyond the natural developments of genetics, that can account for the varying skin tones in my extended family? was that one family member actually serious when he said that members of our ancestral family had come to nigeria from sudan?

yes, even africans deal with these sorts of issues - i’m sure mine aren’t even half as complex as others out there.

i just don’t like this idea that simply because someone knows certain specifics about their ethnic identity/history/geographic ancestry that it’s all sorted from there. talk about over-simplifying african politics! it’s not easy for any of us, no matter where fall on the multi-layered scale of continental african & diasporan african identity. we’re all dealing with complex issues.

but from own perspective, all i can say is that yes, those of us who are locked into the african continent are very sensitive about our cultures and identities considering how much we’ve been exploited and the extent that they have been violently and forcibly erased. so if there is anger, it is not meant as a personal threat. if we are defensive, it is coming from a place where we feel that we need to be protective. because africans have never been given a good reason to trust people from the west and sadly, that includes people with more or less the same amount of melanin. not because we see african-americans and european-americans as one in the same, but we realize that a certain kind of western mentality has permeated even black people living in the west. and this is where the real ‘divide’ comes. this is when people starting referring to other black people as ‘oyinbo’ (as i myself have been called). we are not necessarily denying you access to what we share historically, but rather, we are recognizing the differences that lie between us and the more you acknowledge those differences, the easier it is to move on. just realize that not everything is yours for the taking by virtue of shared ancestry. you have a privilege that we do not have - recognize that, even it makes you uncomfortable. our experiences are vastly different. where your main oppressor may not look like you, ours do. and even within spaces that concern continental africans and those descended from africa, there is still a layer of privilege that sits between us as this discussion has shown (with af-ams being the dominant and authoritative voices).

one thing we as africans from all over the continent realize, and i’m not even talking first gen here, is that we operate at the bottom of the global privilege scale. we have no alternatives besides what our countries offer us (which is often nothing) or what we carve out for ourselves. i’m not saying other people are not oppressed or do not have struggles of their own, but there’s nothing quite like being oppressed by people who look just like you, on top of everyone else. it is probably this type of oppression that most links africans to each other. gather a group of africans together and what are we most likely going to talk about? our corrupt governments, the wahala we face because of our respective national politics, and such. to us, this collective experience is probably what serves as the best binding factor in what i believe makes us african.

*I apologise if any of this is politically incorrect. abeg, i dey try o.

(via blackraincloud)

guerrillamamamedicine

cosmicyoruba:

nok-ind:

cosmicyoruba:

guerrillamamamedicine:

cosmicyoruba:

guerrillamamamedicine:

honestly, being an black us girl who lives in africa, i have lots of thought on the connections, appropriations, etc between black africans and black americans. 

even more so because i live in a world where

1. most ppl assume im black african

2. most ppl here look down on black africans

3. im actually from the states, like slave descendent black

4. most black africans here insist that i am african, and seem to get slightly offended if i say im not. 

5. most egyptians dont seem to see themselves as african

but i dont really understand the antagonism that is happening in the conversation.  black africans seem to be able to have more economic and academic success than black americans in the states (am i wrong about this?).  and i am under the impression that black africans, in general, are seen, in white society, as ‘better’ than black americans. 

also who gets to decide who is ‘african’.  like i dont call myself ‘african’ because to me in my current context it implies an experience i havent really had.  plus, i stay reppin black culture and black cool.  but considering i havent lived in the states for the past few years, everyone around me, in cairo and berlin, assumed i was african, when they saw me. 

so who gets to decide who is african?

why doesnt this conversation make sense to me? 

i guess what i am wondering is, it cultural appropriation if a girl from niger wears adinkra jewelry, or is it only cultural appropriation if a girl from the states does?  feel me?  are we talking about ‘africa’ or are we talking about ‘ghana’…? 

who gets to decide who is and who is not from here?  and why? 

What I’ve learned from the discussion is this, i) people in the African Diaspora are African descended, ii) should Blacks in the Diaspora want to claim an African culture (note: not a general African identity) they need to either have some knowledge of their ancestry or have been accepted/welcomed by the people of that specific culture, iii) it is necessary to listen to the people whose culture you claim to respect, mixing and matching from several cultures is wrong because Africa is not a monolith and iv) respect, respect, respect.

From my view, the discussion was less about “Africa” and more about specific cultures and countries. I don’t think anyone was trying to decide that Blacks in the Diaspora were could not identify as African, the issue was more with choosing to identify with or “claiming” certain cultures. Because Africans largely identify by ethnic group, and in most cases it is unthinkable for someone from one ethnic group to go to another and “claim” it. I’m not saying this does not happen, but usually before you “claim” another ethnic group you need to have lived within that community for a long time and speak their language and it is usually someone from that group that would claim you not the other way round. And they can do this because it is their culture.

I’m not sure about a girl from Niger wearing adinkra symbols but I know that in Nigeria for example people wear fabrics from all across West Africa and these fabrics are even referred to by countries names, so there is Guinea, there is Ghana wax etc. I asked earlier if this counted as appropriation as well. I personally believe appropriation is the wrong term to describe this because power and the power to change how symbols are interpreted. Perhaps the difference is that when a Yoruba person wears Ghana wax, they do not think to know anything special about Ghana and because they are grounded in their own culture don’t feel the need to “claim”.

I understand that this issue can be confusing.

was there someone who was claiming a specific african ethnicity?  because i missed that post. 

and i was thinking about fabric as well.  when i have bought fabric, they usually call it out by the color and the country.  i saw the same patterns in burundi and congo, that ive seen in sudanese shops, and in shops in the states. 

yeah, and i think that we are not doing a straight power analysis and that is making the boundaries unclear.  like what do black americans have the power to do with african commodities and cultural symbols? 

because more of what i heard, was that blacks were 1. making claim to being african 2. making claim to get to use certain cultural products even though they dont belong to that ethnicity, per se. 

it’s weird. like, my daughter has spent 3 1/2 of the past 5 years in egypt.  nearly all that she knows is egypt.  if she grew up here, would she be allowed to claim to be african?  even though she definitely wouldnt be egyptian (not having the citizenship), nor would she be able to claim any specific african ethnicity, but could you honestly tell a black girl who grew up in africa, that she can’t at least claim the word, ‘african’?

i dont know.  man, a couple of nights ago, i was at a friends place, and ended up in a conversation where i was explaining how aave is an actual language, akin to creole in rel. to french, that has definite linguistic structures, grammer, vocabulary from west africa.  and then explaining how, hip hop music, how folks will try to imitate what they think of as ‘hip hop’ when in reality they are just butchering aave, because they dont understand the internal structure of the language.

its funny ive spent so many years now having to constantly explain that i am not african.  and being very careful to not co opt the identity, but now i do kind of claim to be african.  or i accept that what i do and how i am seen is seen in some ways as being a reflection of some african identity by others, even if not by myself.  (like how i buy all my clothes in cairo and yet am told by folks who must shop at the same places i do, that my style is so ‘african’, where as their style is ‘arab’, and its like, really?)

I personally believe that any African descended person in the Diaspora has the right to claim an African identity. A few other sourceland Africans on tumblr have said the same thing.

The objection arises when they see Diasporic Africans disrespecting their culture or using symbols inappropriately. There seems to be varying definitions for “African”. Sourceland Africans identify based on ethnic group and it is the ethnic group that makes them African but Diasporic Africans often do not have any knowledge of their ethnic group. The sourcelanders are saying that for Diasporic Africans, identifying as African does not mean that you can have access to any and every African culture.

With “making claim to get to use certain cultural products even though they don’t belong to that ethnicity” the main issue seems to be respect. Someone brought up some Diasporic Africans claiming to be Nubian and wearing kente cloth without paying attention to the oppression that the Nubian people face today or realising that you just can’t say you’re part of an ethnic group if the people there haven’t bestowed the honour to you.

I personally believe that your daughter is already African (see my first point). I’m not sure how it works in Egypt but in West Africa, she could end up being part of any ethnic group whose language she spoke. I’ve been told that in the past, ethnic boundaries on the African continent were more fluid, it was possible to be adopted into a community and become part of an ethnic group. Not so much today since “divide and rule” but the vestiges remain. I’ve had one or two friends who I swore were Yoruba because of their names and the way they spoke the language fluently, but they had African American parents.

In Africa if your brown we think of you as being one of us until you talk or act differently when you say your not African I suppose to some extent there is a feeling that by not stating your African your not giving appropriate veneration to your many African Ancestors. Who vastly outnumber (in terms of Generations) the ones who have been away from the continent. (500 years Vs thousands of years)

Being with Arab egyptians & African egyptians in both Cairo and Aswan there is a big difference in ideology. As many of these people have different ethnic origins.  

I agree with Queen Cosmic,

  1. Talking from a African spirituality perspective one of the most important things you can do is Acknowledge, respect and pay reverence to your ancestors. Looking at it from this perspective it is of the upmost importance that you know who they were & where they came from (It is possible now to do that thanks to modern technology). Then NO-ONE can say that your not from somewhere & they don’t have the right to if it’s in your blood.
  2. Give appropriate respect of peoples culture (language aswell) & it makes sailing smooth.
  3. The Diaspora experience is a interesting one. It is not enough to have genetics which is African, your consciousness must be African(Again that means appropriately comprehending the culture). As at times many African cultures are at a completely different polarity to Anglo, greco roman culture. This is going to offend people however this is just my opinion which may not be right ALOT OF AFRICANS DO NOT UNDERSTAND WHO THEY ARE (I say this in regards to many people close to me) Colonial & post colonial mentality is strong. Whether this mentality be European & Arab it has many people believing otherwise. This applies to All Africans. (for more on this listen to speeches by Marcus Garvey & Thomas Sankara)

We see an illusion of the world with our presence missing, we no longer produce things appropriately anymore (However things are changing.) When our physical bodies, blood, land and goods played a integral part.  A good proportion of African Leadership continually lets us down. In Ifa there is a believe that we live on through our descendants given the right conditions. For that belief we do our best to ensure our Children with the best possible future. I can quote many people I know (family) who don’t do this. My own farther is included & has no belief in this.  

Finally many Africans need to start analyzing the cultures we consume media & goods from. See how they treat people of a darker complexion. (Most people on Tumblr do this) Personally with me as I got older and started to educate myself I began to disassociate myself with many Greco Roman ideals I had been indoctrinated with.

If anything the definition African American for now best defines you. Until you find other ways to define yourself. 

Lol @ “Queen Cosmic” (read: I love it!)

Also all of that!

(via blackraincloud)

blackraincloud

liquornspice:

And I cannot stress enough that those DNA tests are NOT absolute truth!!!!!  Depending on the test, it’s only taking into account a fraction of your ancestors PLUS science doesn’t have a DNA bank with blood samples from every person who ever was.   They’ve got a few samples from some people in some populations from the time we discovered DNA was a thing until now.

At best, it gives you a ballpark idea.  Proceed with EXTREME caution and knowledge about what information you’re actually getting.

guerrillamamamedicine

private-revolution:

so-treu:

guerrillamamamedicine:

honestly, being an black us girl who lives in africa, i have lots of thought on the connections, appropriations, etc between black africans and black americans. 

even more so because i live in a world where

1. most ppl assume im black african

2. most ppl here look down on black africans

3. im actually from the states, like slave descendent black

4. most black africans here insist that i am african, and seem to get slightly offended if i say im not. 

5. most egyptians dont seem to see themselves as african

but i dont really understand the antagonism that is happening in the conversation.  black africans seem to be able to have more economic and academic success than black americans in the states (am i wrong about this?).  and i am under the impression that black africans, in general, are seen, in white society, as ‘better’ than black americans. 

also who gets to decide who is ‘african’.  like i dont call myself ‘african’ because to me in my current context it implies an experience i havent really had.  plus, i stay reppin black culture and black cool.  but considering i havent lived in the states for the past few years, everyone around me, in cairo and berlin, assumed i was african, when they saw me. 

so who gets to decide who is african?

why doesnt this conversation make sense to me? 

i guess what i am wondering is, it cultural appropriation if a girl from niger wears adinkra jewelry, or is it only cultural appropriation if a girl from the states does?  feel me?  are we talking about ‘africa’ or are we talking about ‘ghana’…? 

who gets to decide who is and who is not from here?  and why? 

boldness added. cause that’s a question i would really like an answer to. are we mad when South African designers incorporate adinkra patterns into their fashion, for example? why is it that black u.s.ians are always the ones who are figures are primarily responseible for cultural appropriation in these conversations?

Okay I’ve tried to stay out of this because I’m African and because I can trace my roots back umpteen years, this is not my conversation to have or pain to feel. However, I feel like at this point, I should say something but I am only speaking for myself. I see African Americans as just that, cousins and aunts and uncles who got stolen years ago and did what nature commands us to, adapt. I will not deny anyone the right to explore their heritage or to discover family where they thought they had none, HOWEVER, I also will not stand for the disrespect or appropriation of my sulture just like you shouldn’t stand for yours”. Asclong as you apply wisdom and respect, I don’t believe anyone has the riht to expel you from the African family because you are exploring a portion of yourself that was stolen from you. Not a sermon, just a thought.

darkjez
Scenes like [the lynchings] described in Southern newspapers were repeated at least 3,442 times from 1882, when the Tuskeegee Institute first began to keep records, up to the 1950s. Another 1,294 whites were lynched during the same turbulent period of American history…But there could be no mistaking the racial and regional character of lynchings that began after emancipation and accelerated in the 1880s and 1890s.

Although blacks accounted for approximately 10 per cent of the national population and approximately 38 per cent of the South’s, 73 per cent of all lynching victims were black, and over 95 per cent of those were tortured and killed in the former slave states.

That number represents only the documented cases where bodies and supporting evidence were located. By ignoring the extraordinarily violent period from the end of the Civil War up to the Ku Klux Klan carnage of the 1870s, the numbers grossly underestimate the actual bloodshed blacks endured.

James W. Clarke, Without Fear or Shame: Lynching, Capital Punishment and the Subculture of Violence in the American South (via darkjez)

(via educationforliberation)

blackraincloud

Black people tags…

liquornspice:

Yeah, let’s just start tagging and maybe white friends can let us know how it’s going?  Oh, I think this is what’s making my nerves fire off right now…  The thought of doing this.  Idk, I just have some image of angry white men attacking me for ruining their fun….

Gah! But it’s ok if I turn off anon and don’t look at the tag, right? Right…..

Here we go!

I’m in, though I guarantee I won’t be looking at the responses.

jalwhite

jalwhite:

The failure of Indians and African Americans to join together to battle Jim Crow was a legacy of European imperialism. Europeans had fostered and exploited divisions between African and Indians in the colonial period. With the removal of most southern Indians in the 1830s, southerners no longer needed to promote hostility. After the Civil War, when slavery had ceased to regulate race relations, elite white southerners turned instead to the segregation of white and “colored”. Classifying Indians and African Americans together as members of a “colored” underclass provoked Indian resistance, which they expressed not so much by assailing Jim Crow as by demanding their own separate institutions. In doing so, Indians transformed the racism they had learned under European tutelage into a nationalist struggle for sovereignty.

— Excerpt from Theda Perdue’s essay, “Native Americans, African Americans, and Jim Crow”, which is included in “indiVisible: African-Native American Lives in the Americas”.

desirevo

paradiscacorbasi:

qweerdo:

moononwaters:

peecharrific:

kidkoni:

colormysoul:

desirevo:

Having fun with racism.

Omg. Lol I have to laugh because I know my mother would have went the fuck off

They know they had no business taking those kids on that trip. 

Lmaooo. I’m laughing at how he told this story. OMG. My mom would have went slap off on EVERYONE. That shit…a cotton field?! You got the children picking cotton?! Trying to make that shit fun?! I live in Mississippi and I’m surprised I didn’t go on a trip like that. Especially since my hometown in near the most cotton fields ever in life. Well, I wouldn’t have gone because, like I said, my mom would go off. Wow.

it’s funny as hell, but this shit happens every damn day.

I’ve had similar experience since almost every fucking year in grade school we’d go to Plymouth plantation and watch the re-enactment stuff and I had to wear pilgrim hats.

Fuck buckles on hats. Fuck ‘em.

Jesus. Those are some messed up field trips. But that guy is fuckin’ hilarious.

This is why you can’t say the N word.

Because somebody white thought this was an enriching educational experience.

(via skyliting)