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missionscalifornia.com
downlo:

A little more about the woman whose life story The Island of the Blue Dolphins was based on:
The ‘Lone Woman of San Nicolas Island’ was found in 1853 by Captain George Nidever. She had been living there by herself since 1835, the year her people were evacuated from the island. But she seemed healthy and happy when she was found:

According to Nidiver’s account, instead of running way “she smiled and bowed, chattering away to them in an unintelligible language.” She was “of medium height… about 50 years old but …still strong and active. Her face was pleasing as she was continually smiling… Her clothing consisted of but a single garment of skins.”

She was the last member of her tribe, the Nicoleño, and no one on the mainland could understand her language, not even other Indians who were also native to the Channel Islands. Unfortunately, she died of dysentery only seven weeks after she was brought to Santa Barbara. She was christened Juana Maria by a missionary priest, but her true name is unknown.
Her people, language, and name aren’t the only things that were lost to history. According to the Wiki article about her, her possessions, including her water basket, tools, and clothing “were part of the collections of the California Academy of Sciences, but were destroyed in the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire.” The cormorant feather skirt was reportedly sent to the Vatican by priests, but it seems to have been lost. As well, the cave in which she dwelt for so many years hasn’t been located until now:

After more than twenty years of searching, a Navy archaeologist believes he has found the cave on San Nicolas Island occupied by The Lone Woman—better known to many as the protagonist of Scott O’Dell’s 1960 classic, Island of the Blue Dolphins. The Newberry Medal–winner was based on the true story of a Native American woman left behind when the rest of the Nicoleño tribe was evacuated from the channel islands by missionaries after the population was decimated by Russian fur traders; one story has it she returned to the island to search for her missing child.

According to the LA Times article about the discovery:

“We’re 90% sure this is the Lone Woman’s cave,” Schwartz told several hundred fellow researchers last week at the California Islands Symposium in Ventura. Further excavation is necessary, he said, adding that a crew of students has painstakingly removed about 40,000 buckets, or a million pounds, of sand from a cavern at least 75 feet long and 10 feet high.
In a separate discovery that also could shed light on the Lone Woman and her people, researchers stumbled across two redwood boxes poking through a steep, eroding cliff. The containers, probably made from recycled canoe planks and held together with the tar that washes onto island beaches, hold more than 200 stone blades, harpoon points, bone fishhooks and other implements.
[…]
It may never be known just who left the cache of tools, he said, but “it’s at least a reasonable hypothesis” that it was the Lone Woman, who is known to have stashed useful items at a number of places around the island.

downlo:

A little more about the woman whose life story The Island of the Blue Dolphins was based on:

The ‘Lone Woman of San Nicolas Island’ was found in 1853 by Captain George Nidever. She had been living there by herself since 1835, the year her people were evacuated from the island. But she seemed healthy and happy when she was found:

According to Nidiver’s account, instead of running way “she smiled and bowed, chattering away to them in an unintelligible language.” She was “of medium height… about 50 years old but …still strong and active. Her face was pleasing as she was continually smiling… Her clothing consisted of but a single garment of skins.”

She was the last member of her tribe, the Nicoleño, and no one on the mainland could understand her language, not even other Indians who were also native to the Channel Islands. Unfortunately, she died of dysentery only seven weeks after she was brought to Santa Barbara. She was christened Juana Maria by a missionary priest, but her true name is unknown.

Her people, language, and name aren’t the only things that were lost to history. According to the Wiki article about her, her possessions, including her water basket, tools, and clothing “were part of the collections of the California Academy of Sciences, but were destroyed in the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire.” The cormorant feather skirt was reportedly sent to the Vatican by priests, but it seems to have been lost. As well, the cave in which she dwelt for so many years hasn’t been located until now:

After more than twenty years of searching, a Navy archaeologist believes he has found the cave on San Nicolas Island occupied by The Lone Woman—better known to many as the protagonist of Scott O’Dell’s 1960 classic, Island of the Blue Dolphins. The Newberry Medal–winner was based on the true story of a Native American woman left behind when the rest of the Nicoleño tribe was evacuated from the channel islands by missionaries after the population was decimated by Russian fur traders; one story has it she returned to the island to search for her missing child.

According to the LA Times article about the discovery:

“We’re 90% sure this is the Lone Woman’s cave,” Schwartz told several hundred fellow researchers last week at the California Islands Symposium in Ventura. Further excavation is necessary, he said, adding that a crew of students has painstakingly removed about 40,000 buckets, or a million pounds, of sand from a cavern at least 75 feet long and 10 feet high.

In a separate discovery that also could shed light on the Lone Woman and her people, researchers stumbled across two redwood boxes poking through a steep, eroding cliff. The containers, probably made from recycled canoe planks and held together with the tar that washes onto island beaches, hold more than 200 stone blades, harpoon points, bone fishhooks and other implements.

[…]

It may never be known just who left the cache of tools, he said, but “it’s at least a reasonable hypothesis” that it was the Lone Woman, who is known to have stashed useful items at a number of places around the island.

(via fuckyeahethnicwomen)

sarakstar
nubianbrothaz:

Delights of The Garden*.* learn your history. un-whitewash yourself. hardhatpartycat:

theuppitynegras:

nefferamaat:

Did you know that Egypt, has the fewest pyramids in Africa?
 Did you know that Sudan, Ethiopia and Zimbabwe have more pyramids (225 pyramids in Sudan alone) then all of Egypt.
 There are remains of pyramids in South Africa, all the way along the Eastern and Northern parts of Africa and archeologists now believe that they may have found the remains of pyramids in West Africa. Why are we only taught that what is now known as Egypt (that tiny strip of land) is the only place where pyramids are in Africa, when in fact the ENTIRE continent of Africa (nearly 400 pyramids not just the six in Egypt) And Archeologist now believe that the pyramids in southern Africa may be the OLDEST pyramids in the world, followed by The Sudanese and Ethiopian pyramids, the West African pyramid ruins, and the North African Pyramids of so-called Egypt. (And im not even going to get into the fact that there are younger pyramids stretching FROM Africa in China, Italy, Europe and South America) WOW Im Amazed
neffera tiy maat bringing one truth at a time  Yaaaaaa

Tumblr: teaching you shit you damn sure weren’t going to be taught in this lifetime
Seriously, tho.
Zimbabwe has a myriad of structures from about the same period of the great ancient boom of architecture that Egypt had. But originally, it was taught that an “ancient white tribe” had built these structures (seriously, crack open a history text book from before the 80s) because there’s NO WAY black africans could have possibly built anything.
Seriously, what they teach in schools is. … words don’t even do justice to what they’re doing by not teaching this.

nubianbrothaz:

Delights of The Garden*.* learn your history. un-whitewash yourselfhardhatpartycat:

theuppitynegras:

nefferamaat:

Did you know that Egypt, has the fewest pyramids in Africa?

Did you know that Sudan, Ethiopia and Zimbabwe have more pyramids (225 pyramids in Sudan alone) then all of Egypt.

There are remains of pyramids in South Africa, all the way along the Eastern and Northern parts of Africa and archeologists now believe that they may have found the remains of pyramids in West Africa. Why are we only taught that what is now known as Egypt (that tiny strip of land) is the only place where pyramids are in Africa, when in fact the ENTIRE continent of Africa (nearly 400 pyramids not just the six in Egypt) And Archeologist now believe that the pyramids in southern Africa may be the OLDEST pyramids in the world, followed by The Sudanese and Ethiopian pyramids, the West African pyramid ruins, and the North African Pyramids of so-called Egypt. (And im not even going to get into the fact that there are younger pyramids stretching FROM Africa in China, Italy, Europe and South America) WOW Im Amazed

neffera tiy maat bringing one truth at a time  Yaaaaaa

Tumblr: teaching you shit you damn sure weren’t going to be taught in this lifetime

Seriously, tho.

Zimbabwe has a myriad of structures from about the same period of the great ancient boom of architecture that Egypt had. But originally, it was taught that an “ancient white tribe” had built these structures (seriously, crack open a history text book from before the 80s) because there’s NO WAY black africans could have possibly built anything.

Seriously, what they teach in schools is. … words don’t even do justice to what they’re doing by not teaching this.

(via blue-author)

eisp.org
goddessofcheese:

shewalkslikethunder:

joies:

Did you know? The Easter Island Statues have bodies:

Easter Island Statue Project
The Easter Island Statue Project (EISP) is a private research program and archive created by Jo Anne Van Tilburg, Principle Investigator and EISP founder and director, with Cristián Arévalo Pakarati, Rapa Nui artist and co-director of EISP.  The profound and immediate need for conservation actions on the moai became apparent over the course of more than 20 years of subjective observation and field experience acquired by us during our island-wide archaeological survey, which was conducted in association with our Chilean and Rapa Nui colleagues.

more photos:



how. fucking. rad. is that?

Holy shit awesome.

I didn’t know that! Cool as hell.

goddessofcheese:

shewalkslikethunder:

joies:

Did you know? The Easter Island Statues have bodies:

Easter Island Statue Project

The Easter Island Statue Project (EISP) is a private research program and archive created by Jo Anne Van Tilburg, Principle Investigator and EISP founder and director, with Cristián Arévalo Pakarati, Rapa Nui artist and co-director of EISP.  The profound and immediate need for conservation actions on the moai became apparent over the course of more than 20 years of subjective observation and field experience acquired by us during our island-wide archaeological survey, which was conducted in association with our Chilean and Rapa Nui colleagues.

more photos:

how. fucking. rad. is that?

Holy shit awesome.

I didn’t know that! Cool as hell.

(via hamburgerjack-deactivated201404)

desert-hallucinations
aphoticoccurrences:

interesting fact i learned in my Archaeology class was that Hiram Bingham didn’t discover Machu Picchu. he “discovered” it in the same sense that Columbus “discovered” America. Bingham was guided to the mountaintop by local children who knew of the area. he even had to kick people out that were living in the ruins in order to claim he’s “discovered” it. 

aphoticoccurrences:

interesting fact i learned in my Archaeology class was that Hiram Bingham didn’t discover Machu Picchu. he “discovered” it in the same sense that Columbus “discovered” America. Bingham was guided to the mountaintop by local children who knew of the area. he even had to kick people out that were living in the ruins in order to claim he’s “discovered” it. 

(via dammitcaleb-deactivated20130328)

archaeologicalnews

Archaeological News: Irene Unearths Bones Believed to Be from Native American Burial Ground

moniquill:

archaeologicalnews:

When the powerful Tropical Storm Irene swept through, the storm unearthed a mystery in Branford.

Part of Linden Avenue collapsed from the storm and neighbors of a beach there found what they believed were human bones protruding from the embankment that the storm eroded and called Branford…

See, this is the correct response: Found burial site disturbed; took stock of situation determined burial site to be ancient NDNs, called Native American Heritage Advisory Council, who HAD A CEREMONY AND REBURIED THE BONES.