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Esoterica

The reason why so many black women/girls/ladies love Moesha is because we had black sitcoms before. Some were family sitcoms and some were friend sitcoms. Moesha was about a black girl who was beautiful, had her own goals, aspirations, and fears, and was flawed. She was the center of this show. All these hott boys wanted to get with her and you even had the losers who did her bogus. She was around poverty and struggle but was also around successful black people. She had those braids too. Those Braids. Those braids meant so much to me. It’s so easy to find a teen show and list off white protagonist after white protagonist. Felicity. The OC. Everwood. One Tree Hill. Daria. 90210. Dawsons Creek.Gossip Girl. I’m not saying they were bad and I’m not saying some of them didn’t have POC. But Moesha will mean more to me and other Black Girls/Women than anyone who isn’t a black female will ever know. It showed me and others that we could matter. I will forever love and support Brandy for that. Don’t even get me started on R&H Cinderella.

-my cousin during a facebook conversation about shows we watched in the 90’s. 

She gave me permission to post this. 

(via supportivecoloredfriendboo)

(via notesonascandal)

husssel

notesonascandal:

Where’s that lil’ white boy who got all butt-hurt when we dragged his dumb-ass for doing his “tribute” to Azealia by remaking the Liquorice video?

I have something to show him.

ethiopienne

ethiopienne:

Being a Black girl means having to second guess yourself when you want to speak up against dangerous Black male patriarchy because you know Black men are already viewed as violent and savage in the white supremacist social climate of the West.

Being a Black girl means being told you have to choose between your gender and your race—and not being able to explain why that’s impossible.

Being a Black girl means being told you’re simultaneously hypersexual and undesirable—and if you get assaulted, it’s because you were a ho.

Being a Black girl means being expected to explain all of this over and over and over, calmly and coolly and without blaming anyone or pointing any fingers or having the audacity to raise your voice—even though people will call you Angry(TM) regardless of your tone.

Being a Black girl means being silenced.

(via notesonascandal)

mindysciddles

(via masteradept)

melanated-queen

for girls that look like us (Gabby Douglas inspired)

melanated-queen:

Blemishes that don’t blend with the brown

Eczema scars looked at with frowns

Stretch marks with stretched arms reaching up thighs

Dark chocolate brown almond shaped eyes

Breasts with nipples built to rise

Round & bold like sunrise

Bumps from hair that once was shaved

Hair that was looked down on

Hair that is now praised

A body with curves, comparable to waves

Hills, Mountains, inclines with roads paved

Told that you had the body of a slave

Bruised, battered, beaten, yet brave

Hair that defies gravity, labeled as “nappy”

Too dark, your pigment makes others unhappy

Considered trashy, because you have a big butt

Once made fun of, but many would pay a million bucks

Lips full, you could see heaven through every kiss

But for those lips were always made fun of.. always dissed

Never kissed, always skipped

Never missed, growing pissed

Picked apart like a science experiment for the whole world to see Neglected, misunderstood, unloved and mistreated is she

Unappreciated beauty in a Eurocentric society

But little chocolate girl, you’re beautiful to me

(via deliciouskaek)

luvyourmane

(via thestoutorialist)

madamenoire.com

Number of young African American women in prison rises

darkjez:

Nikki Jones, a sociologist from UC Santa Barbara and Meda Chesney Lind, University of Hawaii, and attendee of the conference, has studied the statistics of imprisoned black girls for over 10 years and explained, “we have never seen these kind of numbers before,” reports EthnoBlog.

So far, the cause for this epidemic has been attributed to national zero tolerance policies and a justice system that treats girls of color differently than white girls.

http://madamenoire.com/50225/numbers-of-young-african-american-women-in-prison-rise/

“Here’s a lesser-known red flag in the black community: the fastest growing incarcerated population in the country is African American girls and young women. What does not seem to be rising however, is the number of black girls who are actually committing crimes.”

newmodelminority

Love and Hip Hop Atlanta and Carol’s Daughter Transitioning Kits: Some Preliminary Feminist Thoughts via New Model Minority

newmodelminority:

Love and Hip Hop Atlanta and Carol’s Daughter Transitioning Kits: Some Preliminary Feminist Thoughts

I have watched the last four episodes of Love and Hip Hop Atlanta, while taking notes, fractured wrist and all, because I knew that culturally this show represented a kind of shift in Black women on reality television.

Furthermore, I knew that I needed to commit to watching the show. I was at a dinner party and a friend who works in television told me that the wages that women earn in reality television are stratified by race, meaning White women tend to earn more than Black women. My jaw dropped. This is particularly relevant to Love and Hip Hop Atlanta because of the popularity of the show with a crowd that has historically been tech savvy, consumption hungry yet lacking broad representation in mainstream media; middle class and affluent Black women.

According to an article in Newsday VH1 has recently realized  ow much of an untapped audience African Americans are,

“All of a sudden, the network is starting to look like how the world looks,” said VH1 president Tom Calderone, who views the network’s airing of “Hip Hop Honors” in 2004 as the “watershed” moment in realizing there was an untapped audience. Series such as “Love & Hip Hop” are a reflection, he added, of what networks need to do to remain relevant: “We’re creating new celebrities. ‘Mob Wives’ are new celebrities. ‘Basketball Wives’ are new celebrities. I think our role is to put a mirror on pop culture and influence pop culture — that’s important.”

So this post will be about three things. First, why is the show popular and what does it’s popularity mean. Second, what are the differences between what Black women and White women earn in reality television spaces. Third, I will connect the Carol’s Daughter “transition kits” to my ideas around LHHA.

Several other folks have written about Love and Hip Hop Atlanta. Bianca Laureno wrote, “Abortion, Reality TV and Women of Color”, Jamilah Aisha Brown wrote “Love and Hip Hop and Transphobia” and Akiba Solmon has written “Love and Hip Hop Atlanta Shouldn’t Embarrass Brown and Black Women”. #readthem.

As I watched the shows over the last few weeks, I saw image after image of Black women in pain, which is legitimate because many of us are in pain. However, what became clear to me after seeing two weeks straight of grown women confronting each other (Joseline and Mimi; K.Michelle and Karlie Redd) I thought, why are public displays of Black women in pain so attractive and lucrative?

More.

ai-yo

ai-yo:

Which two are the ghetto hair and why? Two of these hairstyles were called ghetto, trashy and low rent, the other two were called cute, artistic, clever, cool and sweet.

So which two are ghetto?

(via womanistgamergirl)

blackandmissing
blackandmissing:

#Cali Missing 12-year-old Zamani Brock since 5/21/12
The Sacramento County Sheriff’s Department is asking the public’s help in locating a 12-year-old girl who went missing from a foster-care home two weeks ago. Zamani Brock was last seen at a residence in the 7300 block of West Parkway in south Sacramento County about 6 p.m. May 21. Sheriff’s officials said she is considered at risk because of her age. Brock is described as African American, 5 feet, 6 inches tall and weighing about 110 pounds. She has short black hair, brown eyes, and was last seen wearing a black jacket and blue jeans. She is believed to have left voluntarily and may be searching for her biological parents. Anyone with information regarding the girl’s whereabouts is asked to call the Sheriff’s Department at (916) 874-5115. Read more here: http://blogs.sacbee.com/crime/archives/2012/06/help-sought-locating-girl-missing-from-foster-care-home.html#storylink=cpy

blackandmissing:

#Cali Missing 12-year-old Zamani Brock since 5/21/12

The Sacramento County Sheriff’s Department is asking the public’s help in locating a 12-year-old girl who went missing from a foster-care home two weeks ago.

Zamani Brock was last seen at a residence in the 7300 block of West Parkway in south Sacramento County about 6 p.m. May 21. Sheriff’s officials said she is considered at risk because of her age.

Brock is described as African American, 5 feet, 6 inches tall and weighing about 110 pounds. She has short black hair, brown eyes, and was last seen wearing a black jacket and blue jeans. She is believed to have left voluntarily and may be searching for her biological parents.

Anyone with information regarding the girl’s whereabouts is asked to call the Sheriff’s Department at (916) 874-5115.

Read more here: http://blogs.sacbee.com/crime/archives/2012/06/help-sought-locating-girl-missing-from-foster-care-home.html#storylink=cpy

(via notesonascandal)