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Help "The Unwritten Rules" get funding for a Season 2!

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From the site:

“the Unwritten Rules” Web Series

When I wrote the book, ”40 Hours and Unwritten Rule: The Diary of a Nigger, Negro, Colored, Black, African-American Woman” in 2003, I wanted to create a voice that had been silenced, judged, and disregarded. And eight years later, that voice was resurrected with “the Unwritten Rules”. 

“the Unwritten Rules” is a web series based on the book, “40 Hours and Unwritten Rule” (Butterfly Ink Publishing, 2004). The series follows a Black woman’s, Racey Jones, journey in a predominantly white workplace with real situations, truthful thoughts, and honest reactions. With Season 1, the voice was heard globally (ie. US, the UK, Australia, South Africa, the Caribbean) and embraced by Black & White and Young & Old. And for Season 2, we want to speak louder! But we can’t do it without your help.

“the Unwritten Rules” stars Aasha Davis (‘Pariah’, ‘South of Nowhere’, ‘Friday Night Lights’), Balbinka, Sara Finely, David Lowe, Kayla Ibarra, Ebenzer Quaye, and Antonio Ramirez. The series is Written and Executive Produced by me (Kim Williams). I have 16 years experience in Television and Film Production working as an Associate Producer/Post Supervisor. I’ve also written two novels (butterflyinkpublishing.com), as well as, Co-written and Produced the theatrical play, “Bitch” (bitchtheplay.com). Aasha Davis and Michelle Clay also serve as Producers on the series.

The web series has received an overflow of positive response and has been featured on The Grio.com’s 6 Web Series to Watch List, Sister 2 Sister’s 9 Web Series to Watch List , clutchmagazine.com, TheUrban Daily.com, Womanist Musings BlogAol.com, and many more.

To watch Season 1 episodes, go to www.theunwrittenrulesseries.com

Kim Williams (Creator, Writer, Producer)


Have you helped a Black filmmaker’s voice get heard?

Well she needs $22000.

Support Black film and media.

(via hamburgerjack-deactivated201404)

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Have you helped a Black writer get their voice heard today?

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Well here’s your chance!

Kickstarter for “Wanted” Update: SUCCESS! Wanted has successfully raised $3800 for their show!!!!

Lets keep this up, you guys!

Kickstarter for “13 Women” Needs 15000 in 43 days!

Kickstarter for “Nefetari: The Series”

Adding in more:

Indiegogo for Season 2 of “The Unwritten Rules”

“the Unwritten Rules” is a web series based on the book, “40 Hours and Unwritten Rule” (Butterfly Ink Publishing, 2004). The series follows a Black woman’s, Racey Jones, journey in a predominantly white workplace with real situations, truthful thoughts, and honest reactions.

The first season is available on youtube here

Needs $22000 in 50 days!

(via sourcedumal)

kuivr

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kuivr:

The SQR Collection by Kuivr, a new African-American owned accessories company. Beautifully designed handcrafted leather wallets.

They need your support.  Support them at Kuivr

THIS IS A BLACK OWNED COMPANY TUMBLR!

I GOT 1000 FOLLOWERS

WE GOT SISTAH SINEMA FUNDED IN A DAY, WE CAN DO THIS IN 23

REBLOG THE FUCK OUT OF THIS AND DONATE!

twerks4loanpayments

Soooooooo, just a quick question

aunaturale4life:

If Kanye and Kim don’t get married BEFORE Kim has this child will y’all jump down her throat, condemn her, and say that she’s a bad woman because she “didn’t do it right”?

Cuz a lot of people jumped down all of the throats of black women who had children out of wedlock when Beyonce announced her pregnancy.

But, then again, I don’t think people will since Kim’s not a black woman and apparently only black women need to be chastised for having children out of wedlock *sarcasm*

Just wondering

Why ask questions we already know the answer to though? I mean, no one is chin checking rappers (including Kanye), for having kids without the benefit of clergy. People don’t give a tiny tin fuck about policing the sex lives of anyone but black women.

queervomit

It Will Never Be The White Man’s Fault.

queervomit:

TW: rape, murder, killing.

I’ve always noticed how in cases of mass tragedy, and even smaller, less-national-covered cases, that white men have been treated differently in comparison to people of color. And since this Connecticut shooting has occurred, I’ve noticed that it all runs in a circle, and every representation of the shooter has a template.

White men can never take the blame. With ‘The Dark Knight’/Aurora, Colorado massacre, the shooter, a white man, was never represented as acting a completely “sane”, responsible-for-his-own-actions man. His shooting was because he wasn’t “mentally stable”, or that he was stressed to things going on in school. You see, he didn’t mean or want to kill them. This was just a manifestation of his environment and mental heath.

With the Columbine shooters, both white teens, their musical and fashion interests, and the fact that they were social outcast in their schools, were named as why they were driven to kill. Apparently Marilyn Manson and the goth culture have mass murder written in them.

With George Zimmerman, who is white and latino (but is viewed and treated like a white man), in the case of Trayvon Martin, he was simply “standing his ground”; protecting his upper middle-class neighborhood from a potential “thug” - a brown boy in a hoodie. He didn’t do it because of nothing. He did it because it was a natural instinct to protect.

As you can see, white men can’t act alone in crimes with a clean conscious. Something has to bewrongwith them. They have to have some mental illness, or be influenced by outside,otheredforces, or they simply have to be doing their “white man duties” of protecting or acting on natural instincts.

Another way white men are backed up in cases like these is by their education and background. They are mostly pictured as ‘grade A’ students, cut straight from the cloth of the American dream. And this serves as the template for things to wrong. The Aurora, Colorado shooter was a “genius”, a “prodigy with promise”, who was having problems and stress at school, which led to his killing of over a dozen folks. It always goes down that way.

With brown folks, and other racial minorities, their intent and reason of committing crimes is written in their skin - or in their faith and communities. People won’t question why brown folks murder, because it’s been socially inscribed in their identities. Black men don’t kill because they were having issues at school. They kill because they are black men. Brown folks from the Middle East don’t kill because they are protecting something. They kill because of their god. Yellow and orange and red folks don’t kill because they were people living with mental illnesses. They kill because of their communities’ historical grudges with America, or because they were involved some-which-a-way with drugs, etc.

In this past decade, a study was done by the University of Columbia on cases of rape of white women. Out of the many cases studied, the study found that court systems, lawyers, and the media-at-large, held a overwhelming bias against men of color. Men of color were pictured and framed as rapists and guilty of the crime-at-hand because they were “brutes”, came from communities where this kind of behavior was prevalent and “normalized”, etc. White men were found to only rape because they were led on, or because of the victim’s state (i.e.: being intoxicated, flirtatious, etc.) - furthing leading to victim and slut shaming. Not only did this show immense prejudice - seeing as the study also found that the lesser the evidence against men of color, the higher the rate of conviction - but it also showed how society-at-large mirrors these findings.

The reason racial minorities kill is written in their identities. They kill because of their skin color. They kill because of gangs, violence, and hate - all synonymous with their the amount of active melanocytes in their skin. White men kill because of outside forces affecting them. Their whiteness is clean of intent. THIS is how the media, journalists, and society-at-large treats white men.


This entire process also shows a major exposure on resources to people of color. Men of color can’t kill due to stress at school, because men of color are viewed as being uneducated. Men of color don’t kill and come from stable, loving, “American” homes because they are viewed as coming from broken homes and as being in some regard less-American.

And a overall by-product of this prejudice is the damaging of other communities - namely those living with mental illnesses. Right now, in the case of the Sandy Hooks shooting, people repetitively attach mental illness as the driving reason as to why Adam Lanza, a white man, would do such a thing, further attaching murder as something people with mental illnesses are capable of; further subjecting people with mental illnesses to ridicule, regulation, and policing.

White men kill because they are sane, consenting individuals who willingly made the decision to. They can kill without being mentally ill. They can kill without some sort of trauma in their life. White men kill because they know no one will put the full blame on them. White men kill because they know they have a larger chance of getting away with it than people of color.

We will never progress in this country unless everyone is held to the same, equal, fair expectations.

(via masteradept)

sourcedumal

Black people who believe that misogyny is not a problem in the Black community are deluded.

alostbird

Unamused Wes Studi and James McDaniel meme

Unamused Wes Studi and James McDaniel meme

(via masteradept)

coven-motha

We Need to STOP Drinking the Kool Aid Ya’ll

deliciouskaek:

shl333:

So I went to a cypher ran at my school last night called “Death of Ignorance: The Wake” as a disclaimer, the whole theme of this cypher was a funeral for “Ignorance” in which all the performers participated in “mourning” ignorances death and halfway through a mock “protest” of the funeral happened by people who were overjoyed at Ignorance’s “death” so all the performances very well could have been satirical. That being said, the audience, made up of mostly black folks, reactions to them were not.

A majority of these performances were beyond comprehension ya’ll and just another example of how far we’ve crawled up White Supremacy’s ass that we can’t even smell the shit any more.

One girl got up on stage and railed against MAAB queer individuals and transmen, refusing to gender them properly and telling them that they were confused, that they were not and could not be “queens” and that they simply needed to accept the “king” inside them. 

Another woman got up and pontificated about the CARE program at my school (a program for first generation college students from low income areas) enforcing the dichotomy of “educated niggas” versus those that are too lazy or stupid to “get their shit straight”, and these “hoes” out here with their “neon bandeau tops”. 

Another man got up on stage and started telling black women how they “done fucked up” with their hoeish ways choosing men that don’t respect them and having too much sex and how we shouldn’t be surprised we can’t find true love if we are going to continue being such sluts “bent over” while we “sip on hennessy”. Started telling us about we as black people need to stop using the horrible shit done to us by white supremacy as an excuse for our “fuck ups”. 

In fact, one of the few performers I could respect all night (I left early to get ready for another event) was a woman who began her performance victim blaming and slut shaming so hard my mouth was hanging open. She criticized women for “crying rape” on “good black college men” who are finally raising the bar, asking them what to expect when they agree to get into bed with them only to FLIP it on the entire audience (who was cheering and snapping for this shit!) and tell them they need to go throw up the shit rape cultue has made them internalize if they fell for any of what she had just said (it was magnificent ya’ll, so many people we’re like…huh?)

But overall the audience was going WILD for these niggas, WILD for these people. These two girls next to me snapped til their fingers went sore as black people still living in low income areas, black people still without access to decent education, black women owning their sexuality, black women being sexual, and trans* and gay black men were torn down, degraded, and dehumanized by OTHER BLACK PEOPLE.

It was sickening ya’ll, absolutely sickening. It got me thinking so hard about how maybe I should get on some slam poetry to set these people straight. I thought it might go something like this:



we’ve got great grandmothers who still remember whips and chains, 
black families, threads torn and frayed, but forget that

we’ve got communities destroyed by drugs they were feeding us,
but ain’t it our fault we were eating it? so forget that

we want the safe happy homes, shoes, cars, and clothes
the humanity they say we never deserve to own
so we forget our own fathers, denounce our own brothers
call em ratchet and hood instead of supporting each other

a black man can still get shot just for walking down the street,
but we just look at him and shrug, he’s the nigga of the week

our daughters festishized, but we merely role our eyes 
maybe if she learned how to cover her thighs, she’d be respected
right? because her dark skin, invites sin
and don’t open up if you don’t want to let them in

we teach our sisters empowerment, by looking down on them
because you can’t have the S-E-X and still expect respect
can you? 

or is it we can keep our legs open, but keep our mouths shut
and because white women know how to do it so well
we’ll be diminished, hated on and defeated
by another “enlightened” black man who don’t remember the color of the teat he
sucked

and as for brothers kissing brothers, well the white man says it’s evil
so we’ll beat em and we’ll treat em like the diseases that they’re leaving
our communities in chaos because one man’s on the dl?
but would he feel the need to hide if we weren’t selling him to hell?
and our sisters kissing sisters don’t exist, just hoes who haven’t tasted that “good dick”? 

so we want to take back all the power, but we don’t want to be the teachers
we want to climb on the black backs of all these “hoodrats” till we’re one step closer to freedom, or the white man’s freedom, and as for our gay poor and still BLACK mothers, brothers, and sisters

they just “niggas” we don’t need em

(via deliciouskaek)

shorpy.com
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vintageblackbeauty:

Washington, D.C., circa 1916. “Slaves reunion. Lewis Martin, age 100; Martha Elizabeth Banks, age 104; Amy Ware, age 103; Rev. Simon P. Drew, born free.” Cosmopolitan Baptist Church, 921 N Street N.W.

Royalty right here. THESE are our monarchs. THESE are the people we should always revere and cherish.

sourcedumal:

vintageblackbeauty:

Washington, D.C., circa 1916. “Slaves reunion. Lewis Martin, age 100; Martha Elizabeth Banks, age 104; Amy Ware, age 103; Rev. Simon P. Drew, born free.” Cosmopolitan Baptist Church, 921 N Street N.W.

Royalty right here. THESE are our monarchs. THESE are the people we should always revere and cherish.

(via strugglingtobeheard)

daughterofmulan
iamabutchsolo:

I keep having discussions about Disney films and how racist many of the classics are, but the subject that I most fall upon is the 1953 version of Peter Pan, which holds an absurd breadth of racial stereotypes that there are musical numbers and plot sequences directly the product of such racial stereotypes of Native Americans. Certainly, the film’s portrayal undoubtedly permeated into the pretend games of children and their perception of how Native Americans behaved - I know this movie influenced me to wear feathers in my hair, pretend to do Indian tribal dances, and say “how” over and over.
The defense I hear most often from people is that films like Peter Pan “were not racist at the time they were made.”
What they really mean is that white people didn’t think it was racist at the time they were made. The film is just as racist then just as it is now. The fact that people can say movies like Peter Pan were “products of their time” negate that actual Native Americans have been vocal about their objections to the homogenization and stereotypical portrayal of their cultures and their race for literally centuries, but white people just didn’t listen to them. The constant apologism that something “wasn’t racist back then” implies that it is white society that deems what is racist, rather than the people of color directly affected and portrayed. Again, if it is racist now, it was racist then.
Also, children buy into these stereotypes, but children didn’t make this film; grown men did. It was a grown man who wrote the original Peter Pan story and its stereotypical portrayals of Natives. People talk about white creators back then as if they were little kids who didn’t know better. We shouldn’t give them an easy reprieve because a bunch of grown men “didn’t know better” to consider that Native Americans were people and not caricatures. If you like Peter Pan, you can like it, but we shouldn’t downplay its racism nor make excuses.

iamabutchsolo:

I keep having discussions about Disney films and how racist many of the classics are, but the subject that I most fall upon is the 1953 version of Peter Pan, which holds an absurd breadth of racial stereotypes that there are musical numbers and plot sequences directly the product of such racial stereotypes of Native Americans. Certainly, the film’s portrayal undoubtedly permeated into the pretend games of children and their perception of how Native Americans behaved - I know this movie influenced me to wear feathers in my hair, pretend to do Indian tribal dances, and say “how” over and over.

The defense I hear most often from people is that films like Peter Pan “were not racist at the time they were made.”

What they really mean is that white people didn’t think it was racist at the time they were made. The film is just as racist then just as it is now. The fact that people can say movies like Peter Pan were “products of their time” negate that actual Native Americans have been vocal about their objections to the homogenization and stereotypical portrayal of their cultures and their race for literally centuries, but white people just didn’t listen to them. The constant apologism that something “wasn’t racist back then” implies that it is white society that deems what is racist, rather than the people of color directly affected and portrayed. Again, if it is racist now, it was racist then.

Also, children buy into these stereotypes, but children didn’t make this film; grown men did. It was a grown man who wrote the original Peter Pan story and its stereotypical portrayals of Natives. People talk about white creators back then as if they were little kids who didn’t know better. We shouldn’t give them an easy reprieve because a bunch of grown men “didn’t know better” to consider that Native Americans were people and not caricatures. If you like Peter Pan, you can like it, but we shouldn’t downplay its racism nor make excuses.

(via masteradept)