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Esoterica

ro-s-a-spark-s

brashblacknonbeliever:

ro-s-aspa-rks:

Listen, you monkey fighting tables…

The US Civil War was about SLAVERY.

It was about commerce. It was about the commerce related to the buying, selling, and trading of black HUMAN BEINGS.

The South was not willing to change their ways and they went to fucking war for it. It does not mean the North was noble, but rather the spread of slavery wasn’t doing our country ANY FUCKING GOOD. The South wanted to secede and keep their slavery ways! 

If you do not understand that, then I suggest you enroll in some classes, buy some books, watch some documentaries, and talk to some people. Maybe even go on some blogs and websites and read….OR MAYBE you should go back to middle school and read the textbook that your social studies teacher gave you to read, which you were too busy ignoring because you were being a pre-teen lunch table.

Sit down.

I really wonder if these “the Civil War wasn’t about slavery” assholes have even fucking read the damn constitution of the Confederate States of America.

I’m willing to bet $50 they haven’t.

(via womanistgamergirl)

collective-history
collective-history:

The only known photograph of an African American Union soldier with his family. c1863-65

collective-history:

The only known photograph of an African American Union soldier with his family. c1863-65

(via masteradept)

tuesday-johnson
mslorelei:

Dr. Mary Walker, Civil War hero and the only (known) female recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor.
tuesday-johnson:

ca. 1880’s, [cabinet card of Mary Walker wearing her medal of honor], Collins Studio

“An 1855 graduate of Syracuse Medical College, Mary Walker was an author and early feminist who gained distinction during the Civil War as a humanitarian, surgeon and spy. Walker was actually appointed surgeon of the 52nd OVI in 1863 by General Thomas in recognition of her skills and was captured in 1864 and ultimately exchanged for a Confederate officer “man for man.” She was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor in January 1866 on the personal recommendation of General Sherman and refused to part with it when it was revoked for “unusual circumstances” along with numerous other Civil War medals in 1917. Dr. Walker died in 1919 and it was not until 1977 that President Carter officially reinstated the award. Mary Walker remains the only woman recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor.”

via Cowan’s Auctions

mslorelei:

Dr. Mary Walker, Civil War hero and the only (known) female recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor.

tuesday-johnson:

ca. 1880’s, [cabinet card of Mary Walker wearing her medal of honor], Collins Studio

“An 1855 graduate of Syracuse Medical College, Mary Walker was an author and early feminist who gained distinction during the Civil War as a humanitarian, surgeon and spy. Walker was actually appointed surgeon of the 52nd OVI in 1863 by General Thomas in recognition of her skills and was captured in 1864 and ultimately exchanged for a Confederate officer “man for man.” She was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor in January 1866 on the personal recommendation of General Sherman and refused to part with it when it was revoked for “unusual circumstances” along with numerous other Civil War medals in 1917. Dr. Walker died in 1919 and it was not until 1977 that President Carter officially reinstated the award. Mary Walker remains the only woman recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor.”

via Cowan’s Auctions

oh-whiskers

September 3, 1864

Spotswood Rice to Kittey Diggs

I received a leteter from Cariline telling me that you say I tried to steal to plunder my child away from you now I want you to understand that mary is my Child and she is a God given rite of my own and you may hold on to hear as long as you can but I want you to remembor this one thing that the longor you keep my Child from me the longor you will have to burn in hell and the qwicer youll get their

for we are now makeing up a bout one thoughsand blacke troops to Come up tharough and wont to come through Glasgow and when we come wo be to Copperhood rabbels and to the Slaveholding rebbels for we dont expect to leave them there root near branch but we thinke how ever that we that have Children in the hands of you devels we will trie your vertues the day that we enter Glasgow I want you to understand kittey diggs that where ever you and I meets we are enmays to each orthere I offered once to pay you forty dollers for my own Child but I am glad now that you did not accept it

Just hold on now as long as you can and the worse it will be for you you never in you life befor I came down hear did you give Children any thing not eny thing whatever not even a dollers worth of expencs now you call my children your pro[per]ty not so with me my Children is my own and I expect to get them and when I get ready to come after mary I will have bout a powrer and autherity to bring hear away and to exacute vengencens on them that holds my Child

you will then know how to talke to me I will assure that and you will know how to talk rite too I want you now to just hold on to hear if you want to iff your conchosence tells thats the road go that road and what it will brig you to kittey diggs I have no fears about geting mary out of your hands this whole Government gives chear to me and you cannot help your self

In September of 1864, as the American Civil War approached its conclusion, a slave-turned-soldier named Spotswood Rice wrote the following furious letter to his former owner, Katherine Diggs, and sternly warned her that she would soon be seeing him again — he was returning to Missouri, together with a thousand-strong army of black soldiers, to rescue his still-enslaved children

(via Letters of Note)

Los Angeles Times
latimes:

Historic black church rises from ashes of Civil War: The legacy of First Baptist Church in Hampton, Virginia — founded by free and enslaved blacks on the site of a place abandoned and burned by rebellious whites — can still be felt nearly 150 years later.
Photo:   Church archivist Catherine Howard holds up a hymnal that dates to the founding of First Baptist Church Hampton after the Civil War. Credit: Rob Ostermaier / Daily Press

latimes:

Historic black church rises from ashes of Civil War: The legacy of First Baptist Church in Hampton, Virginia — founded by free and enslaved blacks on the site of a place abandoned and burned by rebellious whites — can still be felt nearly 150 years later.

Photo: Church archivist Catherine Howard holds up a hymnal that dates to the founding of First Baptist Church Hampton after the Civil War. Credit: Rob Ostermaier / Daily Press

(via oh-whiskers)

The Emancipation of Rebecca, Augusta & Rosa | 1863. by Black History Album on Flickr.

The Emancipation of Rebecca, Augusta & Rosa | 1863. by Black History Album on Flickr.

salon.com
Perry’s flirtations with neo-Confederate organizations and symbols — ably documented by Justin Elliott — are so extraordinarily reprehensible that it should immediately and permanently disqualify him from being taken seriously for national office. The Confederacy was not a bunch of generally well-meaning dudes who went a little too far, it was a gang of racist traitors who launched a bloody war to defend a monstrously unjust institution. Having neo-Confederate sympathies in America should be equivalent to supporting the reconstituted Fascist party in Italy, or worse. It should not be considered something that 50 percent of the nation should be willing to look past, or even embrace.

If Rick Perry is seriously a presidential front-runner there’s something wrong with all of us - War Room - Salon.com (via teramerapyar)

Hmm. Odd coincidence.  At any rate- I find it to be completely ignorant and offensive for the article-writer to make such a patently untrue blanket statement about the Confederacy.  The driving force behind secession of the states was the federal government having too much control, not racism. I’m not saying that I’m a supporter of Perry, but if you didn’t pay enough attention in history class, don’t write a fucking article.  Especially one that’s pretty well libelous.

(via ahungryvirgin)

I think that’s part of it but to deny more than racism, but white supremacy as part of the role of why the confederacy seceded seems a bit inaccurate. “States rights” were part of it, but we really know why they wanted to keep those “state rights”. To uphold slavery, which is rooted in capitalism and white supremacy and racism. 

(via strugglingtobeheard)

At this rate, I’m going to have to memorize the passage, because I’ve been pulling it out so often, yet it seems that nobody hears.

Our new government is founded upon exactly the opposite idea; its foundations are laid, its cornerstone rests, upon the great truth that the negro is not equal to the white man; that slavery subordination to the superior race is his natural and normal condition. This, our new government, is the first, in the history of the world, based upon this great physical, philosophical, and moral truth.

Alexander Stephens, Vice President of the Confederate States of America

(via progressivelyminded)

Lets keep passing this around because not enough people have read it

Hear is my favorite passage from Dr. Anne Sarah Rubins (pretty kick ass CW historian) book about the Confederacy. She says:

…Confederates took slavery as a given, albeit a sometimes problematic one, subject to neither challenge nor conversation.

Confederate had a second reason to keep silent on the subject of slavery, for they worried constantly about how their nation would be perceived by foreign countries. The ever-present search for diplomatic recognition, a sort of national status anxiety, underlay Confederate call for indigenous schoolbooks and literature, and it influenced the language in which Confederates framed their national aspirations. They were sensitive to foreign, particularly British, opposition to slavery. By de-emphasizing bondage as a cause of succession, stressing instead states rights and political domination, Confederates were able to shift the terms of debate, thus making their cause more palatable to conditional Unionist, nonslaveholders, and outside nations. [emphasis mine]

States Rights was ALWAYS ALWAYS ALWAYS about slavery. States rights was code for slavery during the war and today. The South was racist and still is racist (however that can be saved for a different discussion). The Confederacy fought the Civil War over slavery and used political propaganda to make people think they were fighting over states rights. Confederate politicians knew that they could not get people to support a war over slavery. 

(via feministslut)

Commentary. I am sick to death of this ‘states rights’ bollocks. It was about their ‘right’ to own other human beings. Full stop.

(via teramerapyar)

Anyone who tells you that the confederacy wasn’t about slavery and racism being institutionalized for ever and ever amen is bald face lying. Either to themselves, or to you. As a southern history major working on a Master’s degree, I want each of you confederacy defenders to talk to me about Bedford Forrest and his actions throughout the war, and more importantly his actions -after- the war, and how he was upholding confederate beliefs by laying the foundation for the KKK. Please. Pick up a fucking book.

(via thunderwishes)

(via thunderwishes)

salon.com
Perry’s flirtations with neo-Confederate organizations and symbols — ably documented by Justin Elliott — are so extraordinarily reprehensible that it should immediately and permanently disqualify him from being taken seriously for national office. The Confederacy was not a bunch of generally well-meaning dudes who went a little too far, it was a gang of racist traitors who launched a bloody war to defend a monstrously unjust institution. Having neo-Confederate sympathies in America should be equivalent to supporting the reconstituted Fascist party in Italy, or worse. It should not be considered something that 50 percent of the nation should be willing to look past, or even embrace.

If Rick Perry is seriously a presidential front-runner there’s something wrong with all of us - War Room - Salon.com (via teramerapyar)

Hmm. Odd coincidence.  At any rate- I find it to be completely ignorant and offensive for the article-writer to make such a patently untrue blanket statement about the Confederacy.  The driving force behind secession of the states was the federal government having too much control, not racism. I’m not saying that I’m a supporter of Perry, but if you didn’t pay enough attention in history class, don’t write a fucking article.  Especially one that’s pretty well libelous.

(via ahungryvirgin)

I think that’s part of it but to deny more than racism, but white supremacy as part of the role of why the confederacy seceded seems a bit inaccurate. “States rights” were part of it, but we really know why they wanted to keep those “state rights”. To uphold slavery, which is rooted in capitalism and white supremacy and racism. 

(via strugglingtobeheard)

At this rate, I’m going to have to memorize the passage, because I’ve been pulling it out so often, yet it seems that nobody hears.

Our new government is founded upon exactly the opposite idea; its foundations are laid, its cornerstone rests, upon the great truth that the negro is not equal to the white man; that slavery subordination to the superior race is his natural and normal condition. This, our new government, is the first, in the history of the world, based upon this great physical, philosophical, and moral truth.

Alexander Stephens, Vice President of the Confederate States of America

(via progressivelyminded)

Lets keep passing this around because not enough people have read it

Hear is my favorite passage from Dr. Anne Sarah Rubins (pretty kick ass CW historian) book about the Confederacy. She says:

…Confederates took slavery as a given, albeit a sometimes problematic one, subject to neither challenge nor conversation.

Confederate had a second reason to keep silent on the subject of slavery, for they worried constantly about how their nation would be perceived by foreign countries. The ever-present search for diplomatic recognition, a sort of national status anxiety, underlay Confederate call for indigenous schoolbooks and literature, and it influenced the language in which Confederates framed their national aspirations. They were sensitive to foreign, particularly British, opposition to slavery. By de-emphasizing bondage as a cause of succession, stressing instead states rights and political domination, Confederates were able to shift the terms of debate, thus making their cause more palatable to conditional Unionist, nonslaveholders, and outside nations. [emphasis mine]

States Rights was ALWAYS ALWAYS ALWAYS about slavery. States rights was code for slavery during the war and today. The South was racist and still is racist (however that can be saved for a different discussion). The Confederacy fought the Civil War over slavery and used political propaganda to make people think they were fighting over states rights. Confederate politicians knew that they could not get people to support a war over slavery. 

(via feministslut)

Commentary. I am sick to death of this ‘states rights’ bollocks. It was about their ‘right’ to own other human beings. Full stop.

(via teramerapyar)

(via jhameia)