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Esoterica

here’s some fucking indigenous wisdom on saving the environment

neetainari:

What use is “indigenous knowledge” against problems caused by non-indigenous technology and practices based on non-indigenous knowledge?

It’s getting TOO FUCKING LATE to ask how we managed to live here for thousands of years and longer without ruining the forests and poisoning the lakes, as if the answer wasn’t clear enough: By not cutting down the trees. By not pouring poison in the lake. By not damming the rivers. IT IS THAT SIMPLE.

I’m fucking tired of romantic white colonizers paying lip service to “respecting our knowledge” and ways of life in their search of a more sustainable way to keep doing what they’re doing to destroy the world. I’m tired of white people not getting that only way for the destruction to stop is FOR THEM TO STOP DESTROYING.

Fuck your hybrid cars. Fuck your organic farming. Fuck your solar power screens that are out of the reach of anyone except for rich Western people. You created the problem and now you want medals for wanting or feebly trying to make it go away by covering it with an Indian throw?

FUCK YOU.

(via moniquill)

dynamicafrica:

Could drought threaten South Africa’s rooibos tea?
The world has developed a taste for South Africa’s rooibos tea in recent years, mainly because of its perceived health benefits.
Annual exports have quadrupled since 1999 to 8,000 tonnes, proving a rare lifeline for residents of the harsh Suid Bokkeveld region where it grows.
But the tea only grows in this small area and erratic weather patterns - blamed by some on climate change - mean the plant and the new industry are now under threat.
Small-scale farmer Jan Fryer, 53, has been growing rooibos on a communal farm for the past seven years.
Despite growing tea for more than 20 years, Mr Fryer says the new climate rhythm has made him something of a novice in the field.
“The temperatures are definitely getting hotter and because of this is it more difficult for the rooibos plant to grow,” he says.
“The soil becomes too hot and the root of the plant burns and dies making the seedlings wilt and die before they even get a chance to become proper plants. We’ve had to change how we plant because of this.”
The Suid Bokkeveld has always been a tough place to live - temperatures drop to 0C during winter and rise to a scorching 48C in the height of summer.
But farmers say rooibos has become increasingly difficult to work with in recent years.
As a result the planting season has changed from June-July to November, says Mr Fryer.
(cont. reading)

dynamicafrica:

Could drought threaten South Africa’s rooibos tea?

The world has developed a taste for South Africa’s rooibos tea in recent years, mainly because of its perceived health benefits.

Annual exports have quadrupled since 1999 to 8,000 tonnes, proving a rare lifeline for residents of the harsh Suid Bokkeveld region where it grows.

But the tea only grows in this small area and erratic weather patterns - blamed by some on climate change - mean the plant and the new industry are now under threat.

Small-scale farmer Jan Fryer, 53, has been growing rooibos on a communal farm for the past seven years.

Despite growing tea for more than 20 years, Mr Fryer says the new climate rhythm has made him something of a novice in the field.

“The temperatures are definitely getting hotter and because of this is it more difficult for the rooibos plant to grow,” he says.

“The soil becomes too hot and the root of the plant burns and dies making the seedlings wilt and die before they even get a chance to become proper plants. We’ve had to change how we plant because of this.”

The Suid Bokkeveld has always been a tough place to live - temperatures drop to 0C during winter and rise to a scorching 48C in the height of summer.

But farmers say rooibos has become increasingly difficult to work with in recent years.

As a result the planting season has changed from June-July to November, says Mr Fryer.

(cont. reading)

cghub.com
rubysaturna:

biolab by thom

rubysaturna:

biolab by thom

(via oldrubysaturna)

fyeahafrica:

Intensive UN-led efforts are ongoing in newly independent South Sudan to remove landmines. As a result lives are being saved and the huge costs of transportation are going down.

Before 2004 it would take three to four days to travel to Juba from the border towns of Nimule and Kapoeta. Cycling was the safest means of transport. The entire area of what is now South Sudan was a war zone, and was covered with an unknown number of landmines.

Even now that South Sudan is independent, landmines continue to hinder movement, dissuade investors and frighten returning refugees. All 10 states of South Sudan report mine-related injuries and deaths. As of mid-2011, according to the UN Mine Action Coordination Centre (UNMACC), there were a total of 1,243 injuries and 3,158 deaths from landmines.
“UNMACC works with several UN agencies to reduce the threat and impact of landmines and explosive remnants of war throughout South Sudan,” says Sarah Holland, a programme officer with the centre. Besides collaborating with various UN agencies and the UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS), the centre works with international and national non-governmental organizations, three commercial contractors and the South Sudan government. As of September 2011, Ms. Holland reports, a total of 4,273 anti-tank mines and 25,487 anti-personnel mines had been destroyed.
In February 2004, the first of the private contractors came into southern Sudan, Mechem, a subsidiary of Denel, the state-run South African arms company. It began mine survey operations near the border with Kenya in anticipation of a peace agreement (which was concluded the following year). Mechem was contracted by the UN Office of Project Services to begin demining work and take advantage of the ceasefire. Around the same time the UN’s World Food Programme (WFP) contracted the Swiss Foundation for Mine Action (FSD) to do the same. The two UN agencies were convinced that demining was the only way to cut the costs of transporting aid into southern Sudan from their bases in Lokichoggio, Kenya.
Jaco Crots, Mechem’s manager in South Sudan, has vivid recollections of when they came in from Lokichoggio. “Owing to the dangers posed by mines, very few vehicles dared to use the road to Juba, as the entire road network into Juba had been planted with mines. No meaningful development could take place here without serious demining,” he recalls.
(continue reading)

fyeahafrica:

Intensive UN-led efforts are ongoing in newly independent South Sudan to remove landmines. As a result lives are being saved and the huge costs of transportation are going down.

Before 2004 it would take three to four days to travel to Juba from the border towns of Nimule and Kapoeta. Cycling was the safest means of transport. The entire area of what is now South Sudan was a war zone, and was covered with an unknown number of landmines.

Even now that South Sudan is independent, landmines continue to hinder movement, dissuade investors and frighten returning refugees. All 10 states of South Sudan report mine-related injuries and deaths. As of mid-2011, according to the UN Mine Action Coordination Centre (UNMACC), there were a total of 1,243 injuries and 3,158 deaths from landmines.

“UNMACC works with several UN agencies to reduce the threat and impact of landmines and explosive remnants of war throughout South Sudan,” says Sarah Holland, a programme officer with the centre. Besides collaborating with various UN agencies and the UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS), the centre works with international and national non-governmental organizations, three commercial contractors and the South Sudan government. As of September 2011, Ms. Holland reports, a total of 4,273 anti-tank mines and 25,487 anti-personnel mines had been destroyed.

In February 2004, the first of the private contractors came into southern Sudan, Mechem, a subsidiary of Denel, the state-run South African arms company. It began mine survey operations near the border with Kenya in anticipation of a peace agreement (which was concluded the following year). Mechem was contracted by the UN Office of Project Services to begin demining work and take advantage of the ceasefire. Around the same time the UN’s World Food Programme (WFP) contracted the Swiss Foundation for Mine Action (FSD) to do the same. The two UN agencies were convinced that demining was the only way to cut the costs of transporting aid into southern Sudan from their bases in Lokichoggio, Kenya.

Jaco Crots, Mechem’s manager in South Sudan, has vivid recollections of when they came in from Lokichoggio. “Owing to the dangers posed by mines, very few vehicles dared to use the road to Juba, as the entire road network into Juba had been planted with mines. No meaningful development could take place here without serious demining,” he recalls.

(continue reading)

fyeahafrica:

In the Cotovindou logging concession a Congolese worker for the Chinese timber company Sicofor saws down a 22-meter moabi tree that will be loaded the same day on a truck bound for Pointe Noire.
From there it will be embarked for China. It will probably end up as luxury furniture in Europe or the States.
Moabi (baillonella toxisperma) takes about hundred years to reach maturity. Its fruits are edible, its bark has medical applications and the oil its seeds produce is very sought after on the African markets. The droppings of elephants, that love the Moabi fruits, are the main mechanisms for spreading the seeds and therefore of its reproduction.
Due to poaching, elephants are getting rare, due to logging Moabi is getting rare. In the Congo forest elephants and Moabi could disappear at the same time. Moabi has been included in the red list of IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources) in 2004.
Congo, Conkouati National Park, 2007

fyeahafrica:

In the Cotovindou logging concession a Congolese worker for the Chinese timber company Sicofor saws down a 22-meter moabi tree that will be loaded the same day on a truck bound for Pointe Noire.

From there it will be embarked for China. It will probably end up as luxury furniture in Europe or the States.

Moabi (baillonella toxisperma) takes about hundred years to reach maturity. Its fruits are edible, its bark has medical applications and the oil its seeds produce is very sought after on the African markets. The droppings of elephants, that love the Moabi fruits, are the main mechanisms for spreading the seeds and therefore of its reproduction.

Due to poaching, elephants are getting rare, due to logging Moabi is getting rare. In the Congo forest elephants and Moabi could disappear at the same time. Moabi has been included in the red list of IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources) in 2004.

Congo, Conkouati National Park, 2007

saharareporters

Nigeria Oil Spill Monitoring Agency Fines Agip Firm A Token $7,000 For Oil Spills

saharareporters:

The National Oil Spill Detection and Response Agency (NOSDRA) has sanctioned Nigeria’s Agip Company Ltd, a mere one N1million fine - equivalent to nearly 7,000 USD - for poor response to oil spills in its operational area.

NOSDRA hopes this minimal fine would send strong signals to end sloppy response to oil spills by multinational oil companies operationg in the Niger Delta region, but observers notes that such a ridiculous amount  in fine is too little to alter the behaviors of major oil companies existing in the region.

Major oil companies operating in Nigeria are notorious for unleashing deadly oil spills in the Niger Delta region for nearly five decades. Cleaning up the area is expected to take 30 years and is expected to cost approximately $1billion USD, according to United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) study issued last month.

This fine may be in response to the “UNEP’s Ogoniland Study” - A United Nations study on oil spills in the Niger Delta that calls for emergency measures to clean up drinking water wells in the Delta.

According to a statement from NOSDRA obtained by SaharaReporters, the agency imposed the fine on Agip for its failure to remediate oil spill impacted sites in Rivers state.

“The fine was imposed on Agip for lack of response and failure to immediately contain, recover and clean-up oil spill impacted sites at its OB/OB Gas Plant in Obrikom Omoku, Rivers,” NOSDRA stated.

[read more]

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