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Esoterica

faineemae

faineemae:

In response to Pamela Geller’s Islamophobic Anti-Jihad Bus Ads

MyJihad is a public education campaign that seeks to share the proper meaning of Jihad as believed and practiced by the majority of Muslims. Jihad means “struggling in the way of God”. The way of God, being goodness, justice, passion, compassion, etc. It is putting up the good fight against whatever odds or barriers you face in your life.

It is a central tenet of the Islamic creed that has unfortunately been widely misrepresented due to a) first and foremost, the actions of Muslim extremists, b) attempts at public indoctrination by Islamophobes who claim that the extremists are right and the rest of us are wrong, and c) a selective media that understandably focuses on the sensational.

This campaign is about reclaiming our faith and its concepts from extremists, both Muslim and anti-Muslim. It’s about our voice, our lives, our reality. MyJihad includes displaying public ads on buses & trains, the use of #MyJihad hashtag on twitter, outreach on Facebook and Youtube, as well as speaking events and other initiatives. 

Read more

(via witchsistah)

ihavethisblog

Hey there Muslim, Asian, Native, African, Pacific Islander, and Aborigine followers

ihavethisblog:

So, my professor for this class called “Responding to Non-Western Art” has been pretty overachieving in the level of fetishizing she’s managed to inject into the class material. The prompt for our final paper is horrendous so my plan is to write the paper she wants me to write and then deconstruct it and explain why those things are not okay, tumblr style. But, additionally, I want to give anyone who wants to respond directly a chance to do that. So, if you have any input you want to get back to my professor (and, later, the Dean when I try to get this class cancelled forever and always) please feel free to respond to this post or send me a message. I’m going to include the responses at the end of my paper (anonymously, for your safety). IF YOU HAVE ANYTHING TO SAY, PLEASE RESPOND! The more responders, the easier it will (hopefully) be to get this class cancelled.

Here’s the final paper prompt I referenced:

“All of the non-western art we’ve seen over the semester has been supportive of a profound set of beliefs, providing a sense of reassurance, a sense of markings to the mind and spirit.  Certainly in Islamic, Himalayan, and Asian art, there are visual splendors large and small, utterly quiet or raucous that underscore the goal towards enlightenment, towards balance, a sense of reassurance.

In a 4-5 page paper, tell me what of this last set of art speaks to you.  Why is it powerful? Is it size? Silence? Force? Absence? why is it worth looking at?  Can you sense the goal of the artist? the mind-set?  Please give 2-3 examples. And can you think of equivalents in our lives now?  Does any form of such an old and yet still relevant approach feel relevant to your own life?”

If you haven’t been following this whole charade, see: the beginning here, the syllabus here, some slide handouts from the prof here, my first paper with her responses, a recap of my meeting with her about how problematic her class is, recap of my first project presentation, an angsty post I made during our “African” art unit, and my second paper (responding to William Rubin’s “Modernist Primitivism”).

And please don’t be shy about reblogging.

maybethings

maybethings:

Orang Asli children slapped for not reciting doa

A group of parents have lodged police reports against a teacher at SK Bihai in Pos Bihai, near Gua Musang in Kelantan, for slapping their children because they did not recite the doa (Islamic prayer) after having their lunch.

One of the parents, Atar Pedik, said his two 12-year-old girls were slapped about 1.30pm on Tuesday, after the children were made to recite the doa even though they are not Muslims. 

“I was angry when I learnt what happened to my daughters,” Atar said when contacted. 

Atar, along with two other fathers - Hassan Achoi and Along Pandak - whose 12-year-old daughters were also slapped in the incident, made the three-hour journey from Pos Bihai to lodge their reports at the Gua Musang police station. 

Pos Bihai is located in the interior of Kelantan, near its border with Perak. 

A check with the Gua Musang police station confirmed that the reports were lodged. 

According to SK Bihai Parent-Teacher Association deputy chairperson Arom Asir, the children’s faces were bruised after they were slapped by the male teacher. 

Arom said that the primary school has at least 100 children, all of whom are Orang Asli, and the children were eating lunch together after sports. 

“They were made to recite prayers the Muslim way before and after meals but they didn’t know how, so they kept quiet.

“Then the teacher picked out the older children and slapped them for being quiet,” he said. 

Arom added that the parents did not know their children were being taught Islamic studies at the school or being made to recite Islamic prayers until earlier this week. 

“We then made a complaint on this to a Human Rights Commission (Suhakam) representative who came to visit us on Oct 23. Later that day, we found out that the children were slapped,” he said.

Agencies in the dark

The phone number listed for SK Bihai connects directly to the Education Department and an officer there who answered our call referred Malaysiakini to the Orang Asli Development Department (Jakoa). 

However, Jakoa when contacted said that it has received no report on the matter and that it was gathering information about it. 

Arom said the parents would also lodge a complaint on the matter with Jakoa. The community is now arranging to hold a dialogue on the incident among the parents, the Education Department, Jakoa and Suhakam on Oct 30. 

“We feel that parents should have been consulted if the children are to be imparted with Islamic teachings,” he said. 

Meanwhile, Orang Asli rights NGO Jaringan Kampung Orang Asli Semenanjung Malaysia (JKOASM) in a press statement called on the relevant agencies to take stern action on the assault of the children. 

“Stern action should be taken against the teacher involved if he is guilty. 

“The relevant agencies should also investigate the claim that Orang Asli children are made to study a religion that is not their faith,” JKOASM said. 

It also called on the government to put greater efforts to improve the quality of education provided at schools in the interior regions, such as SK Bihai. 

“Our observations show that… teachers only teach two or three days in a week,” it said.

(via hamburgerjack-deactivated201404)

blueklectic

White folks killin me

super-eklectic1:

with this Islamphobic bullshit which is really code for “let’s be racist against all Arabs and anybody who looks Arab” because we all know all brown people believe in the same religion right?!

Arabs gave you soap and colors muthafuckas

SOAP AND COLORS

SOAP AND MUTHAFUCKIN COLORS! (and spices too, I’m thanking niggas everyday for Cinnamon)

say thank you and fall the fuck back

…little billy up here shooting up schools n shit while you worrying about Fatma and Nassar practicing Salah cuz it might be “harmful” to your value system

If you think that Islam and Arabs are the problem then I bet not never catch you in the body/personal care aisle at your local CVS, Walgreens or grocery store chain

…oh and don’t think I don’t see you Islamaphobic black folks either

taqwaacore

“It is said in the Quran that Allah spoke directly to the virgin Mary. It is said that she was instructed to teach Islam to her people. She was told that something was going to happen, and that thing indeed happened. And do you know what that sounds like to me? It’s sounds like the virgin Mary was a prophet of Islam. So why do we not consider her one? She wasn’t given a scripture, but I say that her book was her son.

So that’s my khutbah, let’s pray.”

- The taqwacores X

(via spookyfluffaloforbossofmybutt)

navigatethestream

Signal boost: how you can help Muslims in Chicago and IL combat Islamophobia

navigatethestream:

As many of you know, Chicago and other parts of Illinois have been the target of Islamophobic hate crimes. 

This has been a scary time for Illinois Muslims. Many of these attacks have been taking place during the last ten days of Ramadan, the holiest time of Ramadan, and at a time where Muslims are supposed to attend the mosque to worship have been riddled with fear and paranoia. Additionally, Chicago and the Northwest suburbs boasts large Muslim populations, communities that have built houses of worship, created non-profit organizations to fulfil social justice needs of that community, and established businesses and Islamic school systems. These communities need protection and our help to ensure they are able to continue thriving and serving the people who have helped built them and live there. 

One way you can help is by donating to CAIR-Chicago. 

Below is a snippet of the message i recieved from Ahmed of CAIR-Chicago. 

During tough times, nothing envigorates us and propels us forward than the support of our community and its belief in our work. Our driving force has always been to make you proud; we work for you. While we must be humble about our achievements - there is always much more work to do and to do it better - but we must also not take the progress that has been achieved by a young organization like CAIR-Chicago for granted. The strategy, networking, planning, implementation and the results are very real. It has not been easy. But despite the odds stacked against us, the difficult atmosphere, the relentless attacks, we persist. With Allah’s grace and your support, we are more excited than ever, more motivated than ever, more productive than ever. As we come to the close of this blessed month, we are very grateful for the moral support of the community; we are very grateful to note that it is at an all time high. But we must also report to you that our fundraising this Ramadan has been at an all time low - alhamdulilah. We understand the international issues that has put a strain on our community’s donor power - causes that are indeed of sacred importance to ALL of us. But as we have never wavered in producing results, our community must also not waiver in supporting the local organizations that effectively defend our civil rights, fight bigotry, promote tolerance, and build power.  I am writing today to ask you to do your part in supporting our efforts with your Ramadan Zakat by making a contribution of $500 or whatever you can comfortably afford. I also ask you to consider joining our Dollar-a-Day programIt takes just 2,000 memberships to cover our full budget so that we would never need to fundraise again. Please be among that team of supporters that will help give us full independence to do what we do best: produce results. For just ONE dollar a day (that’s 25% of your daily cup of coffee) you would be contributing to the following results every year:



  • 1) Helping us put out hundreds of interviews through the public media that reach millions of our fellow citizens
  • 2) Resolving dozens of civil rights cases at zero cost to the clients who often cannot afford justice
  • 3) Training hundreds of young interns, externs, and fellows to become powerful, competent, articulate advocates for the Muslim community
  • 4) Building competent representation at the highest levels of government, social, and civic circles in Chicago and Illinois
  • 5) Securing the only downtown social high-rise space for the Muslim community - the Gallery - where we are able to host lectures, book clubs, social events, movie nights, and receptions to promote the values and ideals of our community to people of influence 

I hope that you find that we deserve your Zakat-eligible, tax-deductible donations this Ramadan. Here’s a sample of the three dozen mainstream media advocacy we have turned out on your behalf just this week. Here’s over 1,000 archived. Thank you in advance for your support.  -Ahmed 


Even if you are not a Muslim to give Zakat, please consider donation to CAIR-Chicago so they may continue to act on behalf on Muslims on the Chicagoland area and work to see justice done and Islamophobia continue to be tackled in our society. 

If you’re not in the position to donate, please reblog this message far and wide so that somebody who is capable of donating can and will. 

We have the power to end Islamophobia, and lets empower the Muslim organizations who have continually advocated on behalf of the Chicagoland Muslim community in the face of much post 9-11 adversity and are dedicated to seeing Islampohobia end. 

(via masteradept)

crankyskirt

Assaulting tolerance in Mali [Al Jazeera]

Once an example of democracy in the region, Malians have grown tired of corruption [AFP]

The nation of Mali, and much of Sahelian West Africa, has long-standing moderate Muslim practices dating back to the ninth century. This broadminded intellectual, spiritual and cultural tradition is being undermined by a new wave of religious colonialism emanating from outside of the region, an especially violent and intolerant form of fundamentalist Islam. The hijacking of a secular separatist movement in northern Mali by outside Islamist groups, and the subsequent loss of human life, restrictions on basic freedoms, and destruction of historical monuments that comprise a UNESCO world heritage site, is the latest and most egregious act of aggression-cum-religion in this embattled country.

Having had elected governments for 20 years, Mali was considered a shining light of democracy in West Africa and a darling of Western donors. This facade came crashing down with a coup d’etat on March 22, launched by a group of young military lieutenants who were frustrated with the government’s inadequate support for the army in its ongoing fight against separatist Tuareg rebels in the North, a group that had become emboldened by a recent infusion of trained Tuareg fighters and heavy arms leaving Libya after the fall of Muammar Gaddafi in late 2011.

But the flagging military fight in the North offers only a partial explanation of the Malian coup. Mali’s population had grown weary of democracy’s promises, with multi-party elections yielding limited development gains, and corruption was on rise in recent years. Absent this frustration, the Malian population may have more vigorously resisted a coup that occurred a mere month before the then president, Amadou Toumani Toure, was ready to step down and democratic elections were to be held. 

A deeper loss

Political scientists, and Western donors who have supported governance efforts in Africa, will long debate the depth (or lack thereof) of democracy in Mali and the reasons for its fragility at that moment. Unlike its tenuous tradition of multi-party democracy, Mali now risks losing a much deeper and culturally ingrained custom of moderate Islamic practice and religious tolerance. This would be a loss to the entire Muslim World and the global community.

Things have gone from bad to worse in Mali since the March coup. Seizing on the power vacuum in the South, Tuareg separatist rebels, led by the secular National Movement for the Liberation of Azawad (MNLA), quickly overran the Malian military and captured the major cities of Kidal, Gao and Timbuktu in the North, culminating in the declaration of an independent state known as Azawad on April 6. In the South, the situation started to look a little better when the putschist regime, led by Captain Amadou Sanogo, agreed to yield power to a transitional government following the squeeze put on them by sanctions imposed by the regional block known as ECOWAS (Economic Community of West African States). However, the transitional Malian president, Dioncounda Traore, has been in Paris since he was attacked and beat up by a mob on May 21 that stormed the presidential palace. Now it is even more transparent that it is the military putschists that are incompetently running the southern part of the country.

In the North, the secular MNLA has been ousted by the Islamist Ansar Dine and al-Qaeda Organisation in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM). Ansar Dine, whose sole stated aim is to impose sharia law in the North of the country, has unleashed a storm of religious intolerance on this once religiously broadminded and moderate Muslim region. Women have been whipped for not wearing the veil, music banned in this deeply lyrical society, the tombs of ancient Muslim saints destroyed, and the famous Timbuktu university and library (containing ancient manuscripts) is under threat.

What the outside world needs to understand is that Islam in Mali has long been tolerant and inflected with local traditions. Religious practices have generally not restricted women from economic and political activity, or social interaction. Until recently, very few Malian women wore veils. Not unlike most world religions which tend to absorb local practices as they spread, Islam in Mali often took on mystical elements, ancestor veneration and certain indigenous animist beliefs. Relations between the 90 per cent Muslim majority and religious minorities (mainly Christian and traditional animist) were also generally amicable. In fact, it was not unusual to find adherents to various faiths in one family or for practitioners of one religion to attend the important religious ceremonies of another, such as marriages, baptisms or funerals. 

Plenty of responsibility

It is not a stretch to suggest that Islam in Mali, and much of West Africa, had a lot to offer the rest of the Muslim world, and the global community more generally, in terms of its indigenous expression, tolerance of other religions, and freedoms accorded to women. Sadly, this rich tradition is being hijacked in the North of Mali by Ansar Dine and AQIM, groups that have significant ties to outside interests and funding. Make no doubt about it, this is not a divinely endorsed action, or the spiritual epiphany of an impoverished population, but externally financed religious colonial aggression designed to supplant and destroy local desires and practices.

In addition to the brutal dismemberment of religious tolerance and local expression in this part of world, this region is on the brink of a major famine due to turmoil created by recent power shifts in the North of Mali. 

We all have a role to play in sorting out this problem. Those foreigners with deep pockets who are financing AQIM and Ansar Dine ought to think carefully about the harm they are inflicting on innocent people in this part of the world, most of whom are Muslim. The Malian people must place increasing pressure on the current putschist military regime in Bamako to completely step aside and allow for the return of freely elected civilian rulers. The international community, including ECOWAS and the UN, must send peacekeepers to northern Mali to stop the killing of innocent people and the destruction of cultural artefacts, to make possible the delivery food aid, and to facilitate a democratic referendum on the future of this region of the country.

William G Moseley is professor and chair of geography at Macalester College in Saint Paul, Minnesota, USA. He has worked and conducted research in Mali, on and off, for the past 25 years.

The views expressed in this article are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect Al Jazeera’s editorial policy.

reversedbirth

spastasmagoria:

fishingboatproceeds:

miscellaneousandsundry:

“We’re taught that ‘our’ history is the history of Christianity in Europe, when in fact, ‘our’ history is the story of people on the planet.”

I made this video for people who don’t know much about early Islamic history. I made it because I find it weird and disconcerting that we in the so-called West spend so much time thinking and worrying about the Islamic world—but by and large we don’t spend very much time delving into the history of Islam and understanding the world from which it emerged. 

So…yeah. I really think you’re going to learn something this week.

This is awesome and you should watch it. Unless you hate learning. 

(via deducecanoe)

independent.co.uk

Keeping sane.: How Islamic inventors changed the world

velocicrafter:

arielnietzsche:

1 The story goes that an Arab named Khalid was tending his goats in the Kaffa region of southern Ethiopia, when he noticed his animals became livelier after eating a certain berry. He boiled the berries to make the first coffee. Certainly the first record of the drink is of beans exported from Ethiopia to Yemen where Sufis drank it to stay awake all night to pray on special occasions. By the late 15th century it had arrived in Mecca and Turkey from where it made its way to Venice in 1645. It was brought to England in 1650 by a Turk named Pasqua Rosee who opened the first coffee house in Lombard Street in the City of London. The Arabic qahwa became the Turkish kahve then the Italian caffé and then English coffee.

2 The ancient Greeks thought our eyes emitted rays, like a laser, which enabled us to see. The first person to realise that light enters the eye, rather than leaving it, was the 10th-century Muslim mathematician, astronomer and physicist Ibn al-Haitham. He invented the first pin-hole camera after noticing the way light came through a hole in window shutters. The smaller the hole, the better the picture, he worked out, and set up the first Camera Obscura (from the Arab word qamara for a dark or private room). He is also credited with being the first man to shift physics from a philosophical activity to an experimental one.

3 A form of chess was played in ancient India but the game was developed into the form we know it today in Persia. From there it spread westward to Europe - where it was introduced by the Moors in Spain in the 10th century - and eastward as far as Japan. The word rook comes from the Persian rukh, which means chariot.

4 A thousand years before the Wright brothers a Muslim poet, astronomer, musician and engineer named Abbas ibn Firnas made several attempts to construct a flying machine. In 852 he jumped from the minaret of the Grand Mosque in Cordoba using a loose cloak stiffened with wooden struts. He hoped to glide like a bird. He didn’t. But the cloak slowed his fall, creating what is thought to be the first parachute, and leaving him with only minor injuries. In 875, aged 70, having perfected a machine of silk and eagles’ feathers he tried again, jumping from a mountain. He flew to a significant height and stayed aloft for ten minutes but crashed on landing - concluding, correctly, that it was because he had not given his device a tail so it would stall on landing. Baghdad international airport and a crater on the Moon are named after him.

5 Washing and bathing are religious requirements for Muslims, which is perhaps why they perfected the recipe for soap which we still use today. The ancient Egyptians had soap of a kind, as did the Romans who used it more as a pomade. But it was the Arabs who combined vegetable oils with sodium hydroxide and aromatics such as thyme oil. One of the Crusaders’ most striking characteristics, to Arab nostrils, was that they did not wash. Shampoo was introduced to England by a Muslim who opened Mahomed’s Indian Vapour Baths on Brighton seafront in 1759 and was appointed Shampooing Surgeon to Kings George IV and William IV.

6 Distillation, the means of separating liquids through differences in their boiling points, was invented around the year 800 by Islam’s foremost scientist, Jabir ibn Hayyan, who transformed alchemy into chemistry, inventing many of the basic processes and apparatus still in use today - liquefaction, crystallisation, distillation, purification, oxidisation, evaporation and filtration. As well as discovering sulphuric and nitric acid, he invented the alembic still, giving the world intense rosewater and other perfumes and alcoholic spirits (although drinking them is haram, or forbidden, in Islam). Ibn Hayyan emphasised systematic experimentation and was the founder of modern chemistry.

7 The crank-shaft is a device which translates rotary into linear motion and is central to much of the machinery in the modern world, not least the internal combustion engine. One of the most important mechanical inventions in the history of humankind, it was created by an ingenious Muslim engineer called al-Jazari to raise water for irrigation. His 1206 Book of Knowledge of Ingenious Mechanical Devices shows he also invented or refined the use of valves and pistons, devised some of the first mechanical clocks driven by water and weights, and was the father of robotics. Among his 50 other inventions was the combination lock.

8 Quilting is a method of sewing or tying two layers of cloth with a layer of insulating material in between. It is not clear whether it was invented in the Muslim world or whether it was imported there from India or China. But it certainly came to the West via the Crusaders. They saw it used by Saracen warriors, who wore straw-filled quilted canvas shirts instead of armour. As well as a form of protection, it proved an effective guard against the chafing of the Crusaders’ metal armour and was an effective form of insulation - so much so that it became a cottage industry back home in colder climates such as Britain and Holland.

9 The pointed arch so characteristic of Europe’s Gothic cathedrals was an invention borrowed from Islamic architecture. It was much stronger than the rounded arch used by the Romans and Normans, thus allowing the building of bigger, higher, more complex and grander buildings. Other borrowings from Muslim genius included ribbed vaulting, rose windows and dome-building techniques. Europe’s castles were also adapted to copy the Islamic world’s - with arrow slits, battlements, a barbican and parapets. Square towers and keeps gave way to more easily defended round ones. Henry V’s castle architect was a Muslim.

10 Many modern surgical instruments are of exactly the same design as those devised in the 10th century by a Muslim surgeon called al-Zahrawi. His scalpels, bone saws, forceps, fine scissors for eye surgery and many of the 200 instruments he devised are recognisable to a modern surgeon. It was he who discovered that catgut used for internal stitches dissolves away naturally (a discovery he made when his monkey ate his lute strings) and that it can be also used to make medicine capsules. In the 13th century, another Muslim medic named Ibn Nafis described the circulation of the blood, 300 years before William Harvey discovered it. Muslims doctors also invented anaesthetics of opium and alcohol mixes and developed hollow needles to suck cataracts from eyes in a technique still used today.

11 The windmill was invented in 634 for a Persian caliph and was used to grind corn and draw up water for irrigation. In the vast deserts of Arabia, when the seasonal streams ran dry, the only source of power was the wind which blew steadily from one direction for months. Mills had six or 12 sails covered in fabric or palm leaves. It was 500 years before the first windmill was seen in Europe.

12 The technique of inoculation was not invented by Jenner and Pasteur but was devised in the Muslim world and brought to Europe from Turkey by the wife of the English ambassador to Istanbul in 1724. Children in Turkey were vaccinated with cowpox to fight the deadly smallpox at least 50 years before the West discovered it.

13 The fountain pen was invented for the Sultan of Egypt in 953 after he demanded a pen which would not stain his hands or clothes. It held ink in a reservoir and, as with modern pens, fed ink to the nib by a combination of gravity and capillary action.

14 The system of numbering in use all round the world is probably Indian in origin but the style of the numerals is Arabic and first appears in print in the work of the Muslim mathematicians al-Khwarizmi and al-Kindi around 825. Algebra was named after al-Khwarizmi’s book, Al-Jabr wa-al-Muqabilah, much of whose contents are still in use. The work of Muslim maths scholars was imported into Europe 300 years later by the Italian mathematician Fibonacci. Algorithms and much of the theory of trigonometry came from the Muslim world. And Al-Kindi’s discovery of frequency analysis rendered all the codes of the ancient world soluble and created the basis of modern cryptology.

15 Ali ibn Nafi, known by his nickname of Ziryab (Blackbird) came from Iraq to Cordoba in the 9th century and brought with him the concept of the three-course meal - soup, followed by fish or meat, then fruit and nuts. He also introduced crystal glasses (which had been invented after experiments with rock crystal by Abbas ibn Firnas - see No 4).

16 Carpets were regarded as part of Paradise by medieval Muslims, thanks to their advanced weaving techniques, new tinctures from Islamic chemistry and highly developed sense of pattern and arabesque which were the basis of Islam’s non-representational art. In contrast, Europe’s floors were distinctly earthly, not to say earthy, until Arabian and Persian carpets were introduced. In England, as Erasmus recorded, floors were “covered in rushes, occasionally renewed, but so imperfectly that the bottom layer is left undisturbed, sometimes for 20 years, harbouring expectoration, vomiting, the leakage of dogs and men, ale droppings, scraps of fish, and other abominations not fit to be mentioned”. Carpets, unsurprisingly, caught on quickly.

17 The modern cheque comes from the Arabic saqq, a written vow to pay for goods when they were delivered, to avoid money having to be transported across dangerous terrain. In the 9th century, a Muslim businessman could cash a cheque in China drawn on his bank in Baghdad.

18 By the 9th century, many Muslim scholars took it for granted that the Earth was a sphere. The proof, said astronomer Ibn Hazm, “is that the Sun is always vertical to a particular spot on Earth”. It was 500 years before that realisation dawned on Galileo. The calculations of Muslim astronomers were so accurate that in the 9th century they reckoned the Earth’s circumference to be 40,253.4km - less than 200km out. The scholar al-Idrisi took a globe depicting the world to the court of King Roger of Sicily in 1139.

19 Though the Chinese invented saltpetre gunpowder, and used it in their fireworks, it was the Arabs who worked out that it could be purified using potassium nitrate for military use. Muslim incendiary devices terrified the Crusaders. By the 15th century they had invented both a rocket, which they called a “self-moving and combusting egg”, and a torpedo - a self-propelled pear-shaped bomb with a spear at the front which impaled itself in enemy ships and then blew up.

20 Medieval Europe had kitchen and herb gardens, but it was the Arabs who developed the idea of the garden as a place of beauty and meditation. The first royal pleasure gardens in Europe were opened in 11th-century Muslim Spain. Flowers which originated in Muslim gardens include the carnation and the tulip.

I was gonna queue this for later, but it’s so relevant to that recent post from that person who thinks white men invented everything that I think it’s best shared immediately.

(via dammitcaleb-deactivated20130328)

payslipgig:

whatpath:

Yes, lets imagine a world WITHOUT MUSLIMS, shall we?
Without Muslims you wouldn’t have:
Coffee

Cameras


Experimental Physics


Chess


Soap


Shampoo


Perfume/spirits


Irrigation


Crank-shaft, internal combustion engine, valves, pistons


Combination locks


Architectural innovation (pointed arch -European Gothic cathedrals adopted this technique as it made the building much stronger, rose windows, dome buildings, round towers, etc.)


Surgical instruments


Anesthesia


Windmill


Treatment of Cowpox


Fountain pen


Numbering system


Algebra/Trigonometry


Modern Cryptology


3 course meal (soup, meat/fish, fruit/nuts)


Crystal glasses


Carpets


Checks


Gardens used for beauty and meditation instead of for herbs and kitchen.

University
Optics
Music
Toothbrush
Hospitals
Bathing
Quilting
Mariner’s Compass
Soft drinks
Pendulum
Braille
Cosmetics
Plastic surgery
Calligraphy
Manufacturing of paper and cloth
It was a Muslim who realized that light ENTERS our eyes, unlike the Greeks who thought we EMITTED rays, and so invented a camera from this discovery.
It was a Muslim who first tried to FLY in 852, even though it is the Wright Brothers who have taken the credit.
It was a Muslim by the name of Jabir ibn Hayyan who was known as the founder of modern Chemistry. He transformed alchemy into chemistry. He invented: distillation, purification, oxidation, evaporation, and filtration. He also discovered sulfuric and nitric acid.
It is a Muslim, by the name of Al-Jazari who is known as the father of robotics.
It was a Muslim who was the architect for Henry V’s castle.
It was a Muslim who invented hollow needles to suck cataracts from eyes, a technique still used today.
It was a Muslim who actually discovered inoculation, not Jenner and Pasteur to treat cowpox. The West just brought it over from Turkey
It was Muslims who contributed much to mathematics like Algebra and Trigonometry, which was imported over to Europe 300 years later to Fibonnaci and the rest.
It was Muslims who discovered that the Earth was round 500 years before Galileo did.
The list goes on………..
Just imagine a world without Muslims. Now I think you probably meant, JUST IMAGINE A WORLD WITHOUT TERRORISTS. And then I would agree, the world would definitely be a better place without those pieces of filth. But to hold a whole group responsible for the actions of a few is ignorant and racist. No one would ever expect Christians or White people to be held responsible for the acts of Timothy McVeigh (Oklahoma bombing) or Andreas Brevik (Norway killing), or the gun man that shot Congresswoman Giffords in head, wounded 12 and killed 6 people, and rightly so because they had nothing to do with those incidents! Just like the rest of the 1.5 billion Muslims have nothing to do with this incident!
Sources:
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/how-islamic-inventors-changed-the-world-469452.html
http://articles.cnn.com/2010-01-29/world/muslim.inventions_1_hassani-inventions-muslim?_s=PM:WORLD
http://www.ummahedinburgh.co.uk/radio/files/Muslim-Invention-Article.pdf

also adding all the things we have about those Greeks and Romans the west loves so much were written down and salvaged by Muslims but whatever, right?
if there hadn’t been access to Arabic translations of Greek philosophy, if would have been almost entirely lost.  deal with it.

payslipgig:

whatpath:

Yes, lets imagine a world WITHOUT MUSLIMS, shall we?

Without Muslims you wouldn’t have:

  • Coffee
  • Cameras

  • Experimental Physics

  • Chess

  • Soap

  • Shampoo

  • Perfume/spirits

  • Irrigation

  • Crank-shaft, internal combustion engine, valves, pistons

  • Combination locks

  • Architectural innovation (pointed arch -European Gothic cathedrals adopted this technique as it made the building much stronger, rose windows, dome buildings, round towers, etc.)

  • Surgical instruments

  • Anesthesia

  • Windmill

  • Treatment of Cowpox

  • Fountain pen

  • Numbering system

  • Algebra/Trigonometry

  • Modern Cryptology

  • 3 course meal (soup, meat/fish, fruit/nuts)

  • Crystal glasses

  • Carpets

  • Checks

  • Gardens used for beauty and meditation instead of for herbs and kitchen.

  • University
  • Optics
  • Music
  • Toothbrush
  • Hospitals
  • Bathing
  • Quilting
  • Mariner’s Compass
  • Soft drinks
  • Pendulum
  • Braille
  • Cosmetics
  • Plastic surgery
  • Calligraphy
  • Manufacturing of paper and cloth

It was a Muslim who realized that light ENTERS our eyes, unlike the Greeks who thought we EMITTED rays, and so invented a camera from this discovery.

It was a Muslim who first tried to FLY in 852, even though it is the Wright Brothers who have taken the credit.

It was a Muslim by the name of Jabir ibn Hayyan who was known as the founder of modern Chemistry. He transformed alchemy into chemistry. He invented: distillation, purification, oxidation, evaporation, and filtration. He also discovered sulfuric and nitric acid.

It is a Muslim, by the name of Al-Jazari who is known as the father of robotics.

It was a Muslim who was the architect for Henry V’s castle.

It was a Muslim who invented hollow needles to suck cataracts from eyes, a technique still used today.

It was a Muslim who actually discovered inoculation, not Jenner and Pasteur to treat cowpox. The West just brought it over from Turkey

It was Muslims who contributed much to mathematics like Algebra and Trigonometry, which was imported over to Europe 300 years later to Fibonnaci and the rest.

It was Muslims who discovered that the Earth was round 500 years before Galileo did.

The list goes on………..

Just imagine a world without Muslims. Now I think you probably meant, JUST IMAGINE A WORLD WITHOUT TERRORISTS. And then I would agree, the world would definitely be a better place without those pieces of filth. But to hold a whole group responsible for the actions of a few is ignorant and racist. No one would ever expect Christians or White people to be held responsible for the acts of Timothy McVeigh (Oklahoma bombing) or Andreas Brevik (Norway killing), or the gun man that shot Congresswoman Giffords in head, wounded 12 and killed 6 people, and rightly so because they had nothing to do with those incidents! Just like the rest of the 1.5 billion Muslims have nothing to do with this incident!

Sources:

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/how-islamic-inventors-changed-the-world-469452.html

http://articles.cnn.com/2010-01-29/world/muslim.inventions_1_hassani-inventions-muslim?_s=PM:WORLD

http://www.ummahedinburgh.co.uk/radio/files/Muslim-Invention-Article.pdf

also adding all the things we have about those Greeks and Romans the west loves so much were written down and salvaged by Muslims but whatever, right?

if there hadn’t been access to Arabic translations of Greek philosophy, if would have been almost entirely lost.  deal with it.