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fyeahafrica:

Nestle ‘to act over child labour in cocoa industry’
Global food giant Nestle says it has taken a major step to end child labour on cocoa farms supplying its factories.
The firm, one of the world’s largest chocolate producers, says it is going to work with the Fair Labor Association (FLA) on tackling the problem.
The FLA is set to examine Nestle’s cocoa supply chains in Ivory Coast in January, the firm said in a statement.
Critics ask why it has taken Nestle so long to act if it knew children were involved in its cocoa production.
Nestle and the world’s other biggest chocolate producers signed a cocoa protocol - an international commitment to end child labour in the cocoa industry - 10 years ago.
Earlier this year, a report commissioned by the US government found that the chocolate industry’s funding since 2001 had “not been sufficient” and it needed to do more.
Nestle, in its statement, said the “cocoa supply chain is long and complex” - making it “difficult for food companies to establish exactly where their cocoa comes from and under what conditions it was harvested”.
The firm said the FLA would send a team of independent examiners to Ivory Coast - where Nestle buys most of its cocoa - to map the supply chain.
The results of its assessment will be published next year and will guide future operations there, the firm said.
“Child labour has no place in our supply chain,” said senior Nestle executive Jose Lopez.
“We cannot solve the problem on our own, but by working with a partner like the FLA we can make sure our efforts to address it are targeted where they are needed most”.
(continue reading/picture source)

fyeahafrica:

Nestle ‘to act over child labour in cocoa industry’

Global food giant Nestle says it has taken a major step to end child labour on cocoa farms supplying its factories.

The firm, one of the world’s largest chocolate producers, says it is going to work with the Fair Labor Association (FLA) on tackling the problem.

The FLA is set to examine Nestle’s cocoa supply chains in Ivory Coast in January, the firm said in a statement.

Critics ask why it has taken Nestle so long to act if it knew children were involved in its cocoa production.

Nestle and the world’s other biggest chocolate producers signed a cocoa protocol - an international commitment to end child labour in the cocoa industry - 10 years ago.

Earlier this year, a report commissioned by the US government found that the chocolate industry’s funding since 2001 had “not been sufficient” and it needed to do more.

Nestle, in its statement, said the “cocoa supply chain is long and complex” - making it “difficult for food companies to establish exactly where their cocoa comes from and under what conditions it was harvested”.

The firm said the FLA would send a team of independent examiners to Ivory Coast - where Nestle buys most of its cocoa - to map the supply chain.

The results of its assessment will be published next year and will guide future operations there, the firm said.

“Child labour has no place in our supply chain,” said senior Nestle executive Jose Lopez.

“We cannot solve the problem on our own, but by working with a partner like the FLA we can make sure our efforts to address it are targeted where they are needed most”.

(continue reading/picture source)

tobia
tobia:

While in Berkeley for the weekend, I accompanied my dear friend Ruth to the Albany branch of the local library here. While waiting for her, I perused the graphic novel section and came across this gem by Marguerite Abouet. At first, I was simply intrigued by AYA, but about 10 minutes in and onward, I couldn’t put the book down.  Completely engrossed. The work is genuinely honest and full of humor, as well as tackling some serious issues involving women’s place and issues in the contemporary Ivory Coast. Needless to say, I fell in love instantly and have already put in an online order to get this volume. I keep finding such incredible works like this one lately that I sincerely wish I had access to as a child. If I had read AYA, with all the inspiration I’ve gathered from it just from this past day, imagine an entire childhood filled with such a gift. At the very least, having it with me, I certainly would have felt less alone.    
(File under: Sources to include in thesis.)

tobia:

While in Berkeley for the weekend, I accompanied my dear friend Ruth to the Albany branch of the local library here. While waiting for her, I perused the graphic novel section and came across this gem by Marguerite Abouet. At first, I was simply intrigued by AYA, but about 10 minutes in and onward, I couldn’t put the book down.  Completely engrossed. The work is genuinely honest and full of humor, as well as tackling some serious issues involving women’s place and issues in the contemporary Ivory Coast. Needless to say, I fell in love instantly and have already put in an online order to get this volume. I keep finding such incredible works like this one lately that I sincerely wish I had access to as a child. If I had read AYA, with all the inspiration I’ve gathered from it just from this past day, imagine an entire childhood filled with such a gift. At the very least, having it with me, I certainly would have felt less alone.    

(File under: Sources to include in thesis.)

(via )

fette

United Nations peacekeepers in Ivory Coast enticed underage girls in a poor part of the West African nation to exchange sex for food, according to a United States Embassy cable released by WikiLeaks. (...) Parents were encouraging their daughters to sleep with the peacekeepers so they would provide for them, according to the cable.

guerrillamamamedicine:

fette:

Laura Burke, Cable: UN peacekeepers traded food for sex, for The Denver Post, September 2011. Via.

this is so so common with un workers.  like, nearly every where i have gone where there is a significant un presence, there is trading basic goods for sex.  and people ask me why i never want to work for the un.  srsly.