notime4yourshit

notime4yourshit:

It’s such a different set of values (in Hollywood). Where you live, the car you drive, how you dress takes on a vast importance. It impacts on whether you work or not. If you are working or have a project then there are always people ready to cling to you in the hopes that something you’ve got going will rub off on them or to just like feed off your aura, you know dude. If you’re not working then they won’t even pretend to know you. - Don Franklin

notime4yourshit

notime4yourshit:

Hollywood is tough on those who don’t get out and take the initiative to make things happen. If you sit on your butt, waiting for your agent to make the phone ring, you’ll be waiting. You have to network. You have to produce and find new venues. I don’t stand in my own way by saying I won’t do reality or stage plays. We make that lemon into lemonade all the time. The best way to have longevity is to reinvent yourself. - Vivica A. Fox

notime4yourshit

notime4yourshit:

When I was on the road, you couldn’t live in a hotel, but you lived in certain places where Duke (Ellington) and all of you lived together, and you absorbed their greatness just from the conversations. The genius literally poured out of performers like Bill Robinson and Butterbeans and Susie. We’re in the mainstream now and that’s what it’s all about, but we’ve lost that sense of development we once had, that even Harlem gave you, because you walked up the street and you would see Ethel Waters and Josephine Baker. Whoever was great, you rubbed shoulders with them and they were part of your life. And now it’s none of that at all. - Avon Long

notime4yourshit

notime4yourshit:

I started out to be an Open Negro in the late ’50s. That meant that I wanted to reflect — in my presentation and in what I wrote — the things that I’d experienced, to be black, not incidentally but deliberately, culturally. I’d like to think I was in the wave [of Afrocentric artists]; which drop of water I turned out to be, I don’t know. - Oscar Brown Jr.

wrcsolace

notime4yourshit:

For me, as an artist, the goal is to tell a story that has multiple points of view and to, by doing so, indicate on an artistic level that the old idea of the single author, if you will, is flawed. Because it takes ultimately many people to tell the story of a community, or the story of a society. So that sense of the august author who can come in and speak for women and speak for men, I don’t believe that. Maybe your imagination is sufficient; maybe not, you know? My imagination comes into play. But before doing that, I would like to know how a man feels, or how another woman feels about something. I’m studying that because I understand that I’m one human being with a set of experiences that color my lens. And I’ve always been – since I was a little girl – very interested in how that person across the town, across the street, how they think. And understanding I could never think like they think, but wanting to try to do something about that gap. Not even in a humanistic way. It was really something that bothered me. It was really something I worried about. So first of all, I hope that by being present, as 46 people say in Twilight, the play about the [1992] Los Angeles riots, and playing a Korean woman whose store was burned to the ground by African-Americans; or playing one of the African-American kids who beat up the white man; or playing Daryl Gates, the very unpopular Chief of Police, then it suggests to an audience that they don’t have to sit in their one position. And by the way, when I come out at the end and take my curtain call, I’m still me. So did I really lose anything? No. In fact maybe I gained something. Aesthetically and artistically, what I’ve been trying to contribute is something about details that maybe there’s a wider variety of human beings than we thought about. And we can tell compelling stories without having to have those same stereotypes that we’ve been thinking about over and over again. So I’ve been trying to contribute something about variety that I had hoped – and I haven’t succeeded – would change the very nature of the way theater is produced, and who comes to the theater. Because the theater is a very segregated place. Most of the people who go to theaters in this country are white people. My generation had many promising directors, and producers, and writers. And they’re not around. They’re not making theater, and it breaks my heart. And I feel in some ways that I haven’t contributed nearly enough in terms of what my thought about that was when I first was studying acting in the theater where everybody on the stage was white, and everybody in the audience was white. And I thought, “That’s so weird!” In San Francisco there’s Asian people up the hill. There’s black people across the bay. There’s every kind of person here. There’s Latinos all over the Mission. How could this theater of this town have everybody white on the stage, unless there was a black guy bringing in a pizza – a character bringing the pizza – everybody else was white? How can that be? So I said well maybe if I figure out a way to bring in more colors of people onto the stage, more colors of people will come to the audience. That hasn’t happened. - Anna Deavere Smith

notime4yourshit

notime4yourshit:

For me, as an artist, the goal is to tell a story that has multiple points of view and to, by doing so, indicate on an artistic level that the old idea of the single author, if you will, is flawed. Because it takes ultimately many people to tell the story of a community, or the story of a society. So that sense of the august author who can come in and speak for women and speak for men, I don’t believe that. Maybe your imagination is sufficient; maybe not, you know? My imagination comes into play. But before doing that, I would like to know how a man feels, or how another woman feels about something. I’m studying that because I understand that I’m one human being with a set of experiences that color my lens. And I’ve always been – since I was a little girl – very interested in how that person across the town, across the street, how they think. And understanding I could never think like they think, but wanting to try to do something about that gap. Not even in a humanistic way. It was really something that bothered me. It was really something I worried about. So first of all, I hope that by being present, as 46 people say in Twilight, the play about the [1992] Los Angeles riots, and playing a Korean woman whose store was burned to the ground by African-Americans; or playing one of the African-American kids who beat up the white man; or playing Daryl Gates, the very unpopular Chief of Police, then it suggests to an audience that they don’t have to sit in their one position. And by the way, when I come out at the end and take my curtain call, I’m still me. So did I really lose anything? No. In fact maybe I gained something. Aesthetically and artistically, what I’ve been trying to contribute is something about details that maybe there’s a wider variety of human beings than we thought about. And we can tell compelling stories without having to have those same stereotypes that we’ve been thinking about over and over again. So I’ve been trying to contribute something about variety that I had hoped – and I haven’t succeeded – would change the very nature of the way theater is produced, and who comes to the theater. Because the theater is a very segregated place. Most of the people who go to theaters in this country are white people. My generation had many promising directors, and producers, and writers. And they’re not around. They’re not making theater, and it breaks my heart. And I feel in some ways that I haven’t contributed nearly enough in terms of what my thought about that was when I first was studying acting in the theater where everybody on the stage was white, and everybody in the audience was white. And I thought, “That’s so weird!” In San Francisco there’s Asian people up the hill. There’s black people across the bay. There’s every kind of person here. There’s Latinos all over the Mission. How could this theater of this town have everybody white on the stage, unless there was a black guy bringing in a pizza – a character bringing the pizza – everybody else was white? How can that be? So I said well maybe if I figure out a way to bring in more colors of people onto the stage, more colors of people will come to the audience. That hasn’t happened. - Anna Deavere Smith

notime4yourshit

notime4yourshit:

What drives people to become actors is not the inability to face the real world. What drives us is the necessity to express ourselves, out loud, to handle the real world. We are the storytellers. We’re really the oldest profession. We tell the love stories, the sad stories, the courageous stories, the painful stories, the funny stories. People go to the movies and theater to laugh or cry or feel deeply and it makes them feel less alone. - Gloria Gifford

notime4yourshit

notime4yourshit:

Over the years I’ve refused roles of houseboys and gardeners because I don’t want to portray Asians only in that way. I’m not putting down domestics. If it hadn’t been for our first-generation Japanese Americans, who were houseboys and gardeners, there could never have been the second-generation doctors, architects —- and actors. I just didn’t want to play domestics on a stage. - Jack Soo

notime4yourshit

notime4yourshit:

I think what’s really important for aspiring young actors to understand is that there’s lots of training that goes along with fame. I think sometimes people think ‘I’ve got talent’ and that is enough, but you’ve got to honor the training. It sustains you, because as an actor you have ups and downs, it’s not always smooth sailing. It’s the love of the craft, always challenging yourself, always expanding, and always getting stronger and stronger that keeps you going over time. - Erica Gimpel