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Esoterica

ethiopienne

ethiopienne:

Being a Black girl means having to second guess yourself when you want to speak up against dangerous Black male patriarchy because you know Black men are already viewed as violent and savage in the white supremacist social climate of the West.

Being a Black girl means being told you have to choose between your gender and your race—and not being able to explain why that’s impossible.

Being a Black girl means being told you’re simultaneously hypersexual and undesirable—and if you get assaulted, it’s because you were a ho.

Being a Black girl means being expected to explain all of this over and over and over, calmly and coolly and without blaming anyone or pointing any fingers or having the audacity to raise your voice—even though people will call you Angry(TM) regardless of your tone.

Being a Black girl means being silenced.

(via masteradept)

kaptainkooky

kaptainkooky:

I was born on a chilly Easter morning in 1986 to my mother and father at 5:45am. The doctors already knew I was going to be born with Congenital Erythropoietic Porphyria because while I was in my mothers womb I developed a form of Anemia and my mothers urine changed to a red color, which is a symptom from my disease. I was born as healthy as any child could be really. The doctors and nurses thought I was adorable. I shortly went home to my hometown in Alaska to meet my extended family. After a few weeks though my anemia was getting worse and soon I was being medevac to the closest hospital nearly every two weeks to receive a blood transfusion to help with my anemia.  It was pretty apparent after a few months that my spleen was enlarging and had to be removed. After that I no longer needed blood transfusion and I was no longer anemic. 

I grew up in a small town in Alaska, population around 600-700 people. Now it is sadly true. Small towns can have small minded people. Parents would warn their kids about me and call me a Vampire and basically tried to make me an outcast….a 4 year old child. Adults spread fear and convinced many people that if their kids played with my they would “catch” my disease. Now my disease is slightly scary for some because I’m allergic to the UV rays from the sun. When I go outside in the sun within a few moments I start to feel hot and like I am literally on fire. A week later I develop blisters where my body was exposed. It is very painful sometimes. I have many scars. Since my spleen was removed I heal slower and have a weaker immune system as well. So growing up I would get colds very easily and get sick quite often, but parents had spread the fear so badly to kids that it didn’t matter to most if I didn’t go to school. No one missed me except my very small handful of friends I did manage to have and make.

I moved to Washington with my family when I was 13. My disease continued to affect my appearance and even though I was in a bigger city I still received plenty or stares, cruel comments, and harassment. Due to how easily I scar I do not have all the hair on top of my head so when I was enrolled in public school a student found this out and enjoyed pulling whatever scarf or wrap I would have in my hair off and point it out in front of everyone. Needless to say boys never were interested in my growing up. And when I finally did have my first boyfriend he broke up with me a month later because I couldn’t go outside so dating me was as he put, “Boring.”

I dropped out of school due to the harassment and continued my education at home. I only had 1 friend from the age of 14 till I turned 17. After completing my education and receiving my GED I went into the working world……that hurt. I would get injured very easily so I would constantly be bandaging my hands, arms, face, legs, just anywhere I would manage to get a small injury. My skin is very delicate and is almost like paper sometimes when I get hurt. This of course made customers nervous around me when I was a cashier and question my manager, “What’s wrong with her?” “Why does she look like that?” “Will I catch what she has?” “How could you let her work that close to people?” “Is she a burn victim?” I knew I needed to earn money, but it made working difficult and painful when you knew people would look and treat you differently no matter how kind you were to them. 

I continued to work though and was in and out of the hospital with different illnesses I would catch and develop. My greatest time though was working for a daycare. Because I was able to teach little kids to actually care for me and help me because of my disability and not be scared of me. With a weak immune system though this job was one I could not keep so I had to leave and remained unemployed for nearly two years because people you can tell they look at you and they don’t want to hire you because of how the customers will view you.

In the year of 2010 I was rushed to the hospital. I was having difficult breathing and my chest hurt. I was in the hospital for a full week and diagnosed with a heart condition. I now have another disability known as Pulmonary Hypertension. This doesn’t my appearance or anything, but it makes me very weak. I cannot walk up hills without becoming exhausted. Stairs can i’m sorry fuck off. Running? Yea go to hell. But on the plus side I take a small dose of Viagra three times a day to treat it :D! 

So my life has been very UP and DOWN, but I keep going at it everyday not giving up because despite it all I know I have my life still and as hard as it is there is always someone with bigger problems then you. Like my mom told me when I was little, I’m a Fighter and I’m never going to forget that. And you shouldn’t either. You are strong. You are special. You are different. You are Unique. And you know what? That’s perfectly O.K. You’re a Fighter! Never let anyone tell you otherwise!

(via thestoutorialist)

black-ink-on-pink

Why Skin Color of Fictional Characters are Important

black-ink-on-pink:

Okay. I’m going on another rant here and forgive me, but I saw something that just irks me so, and I’m feeling the need to grab people and shake them and beg them to just understand please

So I’m reading various things on tumblr, related to Legend of Korra, the portrayal and representation of dark-skinned characters in fiction, and the question that comes around is: Why is this even important? 

Let me answer that for you.

—-

Okay, so I have a boyfriend. He’s black, and like me, he’s into cartoons, anime, tv shows, etc.   On his facebook, he keeps an gallery of images of dark-skinned characters. Doesn’t matter if they’re Egyptian, South American, Indian, etc. Just dark-skinned characters in general. A friend once asked him why this gallery exists in the first place, and bf answered how they were all positive portrayals of black/dark characters in anime/video games/cartoons. 

That someone, who was Caucasian, was like, oh, and simply though it was a small quirk, little hobby, something my bf does when he’s bored. 

For bf and me, who are both persons of color, that gallery means much more than a quirky hobby. I can’t explain it well, but basically, it’s a huge deal for us, particularly him. It’s a collection of the few black/dark characters in fiction, it’s representation, it’s him seeing people who look like him be scientists and geniuses, do martial arts, kick ass, look beautiful, be human; it’s people who are dark-skinned be valued and be deep, developed characters and have their own stories and desires and goals; and it’s so damn rare in fiction that he has a gallery of about only 50 characters and that’s it. Compared to, say, the hundreds of thousands of light-skinned characters. 

My bf, he’s a writer. He wants to one day make books and tv shows and movies where the main character will be anything other than a straight white male character. He’s making his life goal to do so. 

Because growing up and even now, still, he was loved seeing characters that are black like him. Loved characters that looked like him getting to be heroes, go on adventures, save the day, be cheered on and loved - showing him that little kids like him, black kids, kids of color, can do anything they want and they are just as good as the white kids who are already heroes and adventures and princes and princesses and whatever the hell there is to be. In a society where he eventually grows up to tell me, one day, when we were out for a drive, how to respond if I ever get pulled over by a cop, to be respectful and calm and make no sudden movements - he doesn’t know if it’s different for Asians but still, be safe - and he has to do all this, be extremely careful simply because he’s black…well, it’s something when black/dark characters are portrayed as anything other than dangerous or expandable or a bunch of horrid shit. 

And then there’s me, who’s Chinese and tans easily and, along with my dad, is the darkest in the family. And let me tell you how screw-up colorism, light-skin-is-better-than-dark-skin mentality is, because there’s my mom (pale) who looks down on my dad for having olive skin and would hush hush tell me when I was younger how ‘dark’ my dad was and how ‘dark’ his family was, it was such an unfortunate thing, let’s hope that I don’t turn out like them, and made it as if their being ‘dark’ (at most an olive skin tone, geez) had something to do with all their flaws and whatnot. And then she goes through the trouble of wearing gloves when driving just so her arms wouldn’t get tanned and take out an umbrella when going outside on a sunny day. And I grow up in this setting, being told how pretty I would be if only I was pale like her.

I hate it. I hate all that and love it whenever I see somehow who is olived-skinned or dark-skinned and they were beautiful - considered beautiful, are beautiful-, and I would know that I am pretty too. And I hope no kid would ever grow up in a screwed-up environment like that and they can look everywhere and see that their dark skin is beautiful, desirable as well. 

So, Korra. Dark-skinned Korra, gorgeous and headstrong and desirable and powerful and Avatar, protector of the whole world - it’s one of the first time a dark-skinned character has been portrayed as so, main character of such a beloved mainstream TV-series. (My bf loves Legend of Korra and its predecessor series before it. I do too.) And if she is in fact getting lighter, even unintentionally. Well. That would be a devastating blow. 

And that’s why skin color in fiction is important. Because of formative influences, of subtle stuff in psychology that worms its way into the mind of little kids, telling them this is how the world worked, this is how your life will eventually be, this is the way you should think. Of the simple fact of having positive role models for all types of children. 

Please try to understand. And at the very least, please don’t just brush off and scoff these concerns. 

tayraerenz

To start off, I love everyone equally.

deliciouskaek:

therhapsodyincidents:

taylorsuxx:

I have tons of African American friends and I wouldn’t change them for the world. I never once have been a person to look at someones color and judge.

Having said that, I truthfully don’t understand why we single out a particular month to celebrate their history. It should be celebrated daily. Just as any other race or culture. Face it, in our history, many different races have been mistreated. Why not have a Hebrew history month? They were enslaved for thousands of years also. I’m in no way putting African Americans down. They should be glorified as anyone else should. Without people like Martin Luther King JR and Rosa Parks we would in no way be where we are today. In the same sense Abraham Lincoln and his famous Gettysburg speech helped to bring about the abolishment of slavery. If I sat here and explained how each and every race inspired the nation and impacted history it would take up many months and not just a solitary one.

If we had a white history month, I’d make this same argument.

God created us to be equal, let us be equal.

OK, you know with a title like that it’s about to be some bullshit. 

First and foremost everyone needs to understand that,

BLACK PEOPLE ARE NOT THE ONLY PEOPLE WITH DEDICATED HISTORY MONTHS!

There is National Hispanic Heritage Month

There is Irish American Heritage Month 

There is Italian American History Month (although it’s centered around Columbus so I don’t know if you really want it)

There is Jewish American Heritage Month.

THERE ARE MONTHS, AS IN PLURAL DEDICATED TO WHITE PEOPLE! Not even including the rest of the year!

So why is it, when we finally get some recognition, during the shortest month of the year of course, somehow we’re being put on a pedestal?

We’re being unduly praised

Why does everyone come for us?!

Black History Month is bullshit anyway! NO ONE ACTUALLY LEARNS ANYTHING!

All you get is a bunch of bullshit pandering McDonald’s Commercials and 30 sec info spots on BET and shit.

Black History Month is just a method to shut Black people up for a month, and we can’t even have that?

That is some straight bullshit.

But we’re all people! We all bleed red!

:|

(via deliciouskaek)

facebook.com
rabbleprochoice:

stankdank:

A picture began circulating in November. It should be “The Picture of the Year,” or perhaps, “Picture of the Decade.” It won’t be. In fact, unless you obtained a copy of the U.S. paper which published it, you probably would never have seen it.The picture is that of a 21-week-old unborn baby named Samuel Alexander Armas, who is being operated on by surgeon named Joseph Bruner. The baby was diagnosed with spina bifida and would not survive if removed from his mother’s womb. Little Samuel’s mother, Julie Armas, is an obstetrics nurse in Atlanta. She knew of Dr. Bruner’s remarkable surgical procedure. Practicing at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, he performs these special operations while the baby is still in the womb.During the procedure, the doctor removes the uterus via C-section and makes a small incision to operate on the baby. As Dr. Bruner completed the surgery on Samuel, the little guy reached his tiny, but fully developed hand through the incision and firmly grasped the surgeon’s finger. Dr. Bruner was reported as saying that when his finger was grasped, it was the most emotional moment of his life, and that for an instant during the procedure he was just frozen, totally immobile.The photograph captures this amazing event with perfect clarity. The editors titled the picture, “Hand of Hope.” The text explaining the picture begins, “The tiny hand of 21-week-old fetus Samuel Alexander Armas emerges from the mother’s uterus to grasp the finger of Dr. Joseph Bruner as if thanking the doctor for the gift of life.”Little Samuel’s mother said they “wept for days” when they saw the picture. She said, “The photo reminds us pregnancy isn’t about disability or an illness, it’s about a little person” Samuel was born in perfect health, the operation 100 percent successful. Now see the actual picture, and it is awesome…incredible….an d hey, pass it on! The world needs to see this one! 

At the bold, yeah no.
If you know even the basics of how a surgery is performed, you would know that the fetus reaching out and touching/grabbing the surgeon’s finger would be fucking impossible.
Do you think the mother of that fetus was awake during this surgery? NO.
She was put under anesthesia. Guess what happens when you put something in a pregnant person…IT ALSO GOES TO THE FETUS.
That’s why drinking alcohol or eating soft cheese or sushi is such a “no-no” for pregnant people. 
So, the mother was put under anesthesia and couldn’t move…HER FETUS COULDN’T EITHER. That is how pregnancy and anesthesia work.
Don’t take my word for it, though, take the actual surgeon’s:

The baby did not reach out. The baby was anesthetized. It was not aware of what was going on.

The surgeon never said that it was an emotional experience for him, the pro-life photographer who took said it. The surgeon pulled the hand out himself, as the fetus was fucking paralyzed at the time.
Here, I did your research for you:
Source #1 regarding the inaccuracy of this photo.
Source #2 regarding the inaccuracy of this photo.
Source #3 regarding the inaccuracy of this photo.
Finding those took me, like, four minutes of Googling and skimming.
Love,
Rabble

rabbleprochoice:

stankdank:

A picture began circulating in November. It should be “The Picture of the Year,” or perhaps, “Picture of the Decade.” It won’t be. In fact, unless you obtained a copy of the U.S. paper which published it, you probably would never have seen it.

The picture is that of a 21-week-old unborn baby named Samuel Alexander Armas, who is being operated on by surgeon named Joseph Bruner. The baby was diagnosed with spina bifida and would not survive if removed from his mother’s womb. Little Samuel’s mother, Julie Armas, is an obstetrics nurse in Atlanta. She knew of Dr. Bruner’s remarkable surgical procedure. Practicing at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, he performs these special operations while the baby is still in the womb.

During the procedure, the doctor removes the uterus via C-section and makes a small incision to operate on the baby. As Dr. Bruner completed the surgery on Samuel, the little guy reached his tiny, but fully developed hand through the incision and firmly grasped the surgeon’s finger. Dr. Bruner was reported as saying that when his finger was grasped, it was the most emotional moment of his life, and that for an instant during the procedure he was just frozen, totally immobile.

The photograph captures this amazing event with perfect clarity. The editors titled the picture, “Hand of Hope.” The text explaining the picture begins, “The tiny hand of 21-week-old fetus Samuel Alexander Armas emerges from the mother’s uterus to grasp the finger of Dr. Joseph Bruner as if thanking the doctor for the gift of life.”

Little Samuel’s mother said they “wept for days” when they saw the picture. She said, “The photo reminds us pregnancy isn’t about disability or an illness, it’s about a little person” Samuel was born in perfect health, the operation 100 percent successful. Now see the actual picture, and it is awesome…incredible….an d hey, pass it on! The world needs to see this one! 

At the bold, yeah no.

If you know even the basics of how a surgery is performed, you would know that the fetus reaching out and touching/grabbing the surgeon’s finger would be fucking impossible.

Do you think the mother of that fetus was awake during this surgery? NO.

She was put under anesthesia. Guess what happens when you put something in a pregnant person…IT ALSO GOES TO THE FETUS.

That’s why drinking alcohol or eating soft cheese or sushi is such a “no-no” for pregnant people. 

So, the mother was put under anesthesia and couldn’t move…HER FETUS COULDN’T EITHER. That is how pregnancy and anesthesia work.

Don’t take my word for it, though, take the actual surgeon’s:

The baby did not reach out. The baby was anesthetized. It was not aware of what was going on.

The surgeon never said that it was an emotional experience for him, the pro-life photographer who took said it. The surgeon pulled the hand out himself, as the fetus was fucking paralyzed at the time.

Here, I did your research for you:

Source #1 regarding the inaccuracy of this photo.

Source #2 regarding the inaccuracy of this photo.

Source #3 regarding the inaccuracy of this photo.

Finding those took me, like, four minutes of Googling and skimming.

Love,

Rabble

(via squeetothegee-deactivated201111)

the-ill.com
the-ill:

(source: the-ill.com)

the-ill:

(source: the-ill.com)