masteradept
ladymargo:

thecivilwarparlor:

Rare Photograph Reveals Details about pre-Civil War Slave in Baltimore
Martha Ann “Patty” Atavis holds Alice Lee Whitridge, one of the children in her care. The Maryland Historical Society recently acquired the rare photograph and documents that shed light on Atavis’ life as a pre-Civil War domestic slave in Baltimore. Historians plan to use the new information to learn more about urban slavery in Baltimore and around the country. 
“Daguerreotypes of slaves by themselves are incredibly rare, let alone ones that have information as to the sitter. The auction package w/photo included documentation about Atavis, including an 1839 bill of sale that identified Atavis as a “slave for life.” Her previous owner, Ruth McCubbin, sold Atavis to Whitridge for $200. Atavis was about 23 years old when she was sold. 
The images and documentation are currently on display at the Maryland Historical Society. For more information, please call the Historical Society at 410-685-3750 orhttp://www.mdhs.org/.

The look on her face.
I mean, both of them.

ladymargo:

thecivilwarparlor:

Rare Photograph Reveals Details about pre-Civil War Slave in Baltimore

Martha Ann “Patty” Atavis holds Alice Lee Whitridge, one of the children in her care. The Maryland Historical Society recently acquired the rare photograph and documents that shed light on Atavis’ life as a pre-Civil War domestic slave in Baltimore. Historians plan to use the new information to learn more about urban slavery in Baltimore and around the country. 

“Daguerreotypes of slaves by themselves are incredibly rare, let alone ones that have information as to the sitter. The auction package w/photo included documentation about Atavis, including an 1839 bill of sale that identified Atavis as a “slave for life.” Her previous owner, Ruth McCubbin, sold Atavis to Whitridge for $200. Atavis was about 23 years old when she was sold. 

The images and documentation are currently on display at the Maryland Historical Society. For more information, please call the Historical Society at 410-685-3750 orhttp://www.mdhs.org/.

The look on her face.

I mean, both of them.

womanistgamergirl

After slavery ended, the myth of lascivious, wanton, and sexually available black women could not alone support a system of domestic labor that required proximity between black women and the white families that employed them. An insatiable breeder was profitable in agricultural slavery because children born to bondswomen became the property of the enslavers regardless of their racial composition. But after slavery’s demise, the specter of racial intermixing in a context of (nominal) legal equality became a national anxiety. Black women who labored in white homes had to be reimagined. A seductive, exotic wench would threaten the stability of white families, but an asexual, omnicompetent, devoted servant was ideal.

With the Compromise of 1877, which ended Reconstruction and withdrew federal troops from the South, white secessionists were given the power to craft segregation codes, disfranchise black voters, and revise the Confederate narrative as triumphant rather than traitorous. America’s newest citizens, meanwhile, were relegated to forced agricultural peonage through rural sharecropping, grinding urban poverty in the South’s new cities, new forms of segregation
through the imposition of Jim Crow, and racial terror meted out by the Ku Klux Klan. The white Southern imagination generated myths of black manhood and womanhood that supported these segregationist policies. Mammy was a central figure in this mythmaking. ‘‘African American women as mammies served to challenge critics who argued that slavery was harsh and demeaning. After all, [mammies] were depicted as being happy and content with their duties as servants.’’

Enslaved women working as domestic servants in Southern plantations were taken from their families and forced to nurse white babies while their own infants subsisted on sugar water. They were not voluntary members of the enslaver’s family; they were women laboring under coercion and the constant threat of physical and sexual violence. They had no enforceable authority over their white charges and could not even resist the sale and exploitation of their own children. Domestic servants often were not grandmotherly types but teenagers or very young women. It was white supremacist imaginations that remembered these powerless, coerced slave girls as
soothing, comfortable, consenting women.

Unlike the bad black woman who was aggressively sexual, Mammy had no personal needs or desires. She was a trusted adviser and confidante whose skills were used exclusively in service of the white families to which she was attached. Mammy was not a protector or defender of black children or communities. She represented a maternal ideal, but not in caring for her own children. Her love, doting, advice, correction, and supervision were reserved exclusively for white women and children. Her loyal affection to white men, women, and children was entirely devoid of sexual desire.

Melissa Harris-Perry Sister Citizen; Shame, Stereotypes and Black Women in America (via brashblacknonbeliever)
dammitcaleb-deactivated20130328

darkjez:

ETHNIC NOTIONS

Ethnic Notions is Marlon Riggs’ Emmy-winning documentary that takes viewers on a disturbing voyage through American history, tracing for the first time the deep-rooted stereotypes which have fueled anti-black prejudice. Through these images we can begin to understand the evolution of racial consciousness in America.

Loyal Toms, carefree Sambos, faithful Mammies, grinning Coons, savage Brutes, and wide-eyed Pickaninnies roll across the screen in cartoons, feature films, popular songs, minstrel shows, advertisements, folklore, household artifacts, even children’s rhymes. These dehumanizing caricatures permeated popular culture from the 1820s to the Civil Rights period and implanted themselves deep in the American psyche.

Narration by Esther Rolle and commentary by respected scholars shed light on the origins and devastating consequences of this 150 yearlong parade of bigotry.Ethnic Notions situates each stereotype historically in white society’s shifting needs to justify racist oppression from slavery to the present day. The insidious images exacted a devastating toll on black Americans and continue to undermine race relations.

Ethnic Notions has quickly become a mainstay of university, high school, and public library collections. It is a basic audio visual text for American History, Sociology, Black Studies, Anthropology, Social Psychology, Media Studies, and any training program concerned with stereotyping and cross-cultural understanding.

Approaching a complex and delicate subject with great sensitivity, Ethnic Notions equips viewers to view media and other cultural representations with a more critical eye. It’s a direct challenge to those who say, “It was just a joke.”

This is a must-watch documentary for every American & an integral resource for an anti-racist’s education.

dammitcaleb-deactivated20130328
velocicrafter:

Every once in a while, I see dolls/figurines/statues like this pop up in one of the various doll-related tags I track. I’ve known black folks who collect this sort of memorabilia in a sort of “never forget” sort of spirit. 
Sometimes, white folks collect them with intentions that are decidedly less honorable. It may be a less-savory act of remembering when times were different, or a blissful ignorance of what figures like this represent.
Either way, it all boils down to a history & a cultural tradition in which the identities of POC are created by white people for amusement, consumption, establishment & maintenance of a certain kind of ‘status quo’ & definitely for reminding everyone who’s ‘really’ in charge around here.

velocicrafter:

Every once in a while, I see dolls/figurines/statues like this pop up in one of the various doll-related tags I track. I’ve known black folks who collect this sort of memorabilia in a sort of “never forget” sort of spirit. 

Sometimes, white folks collect them with intentions that are decidedly less honorable. It may be a less-savory act of remembering when times were different, or a blissful ignorance of what figures like this represent.

Either way, it all boils down to a history & a cultural tradition in which the identities of POC are created by white people for amusement, consumption, establishment & maintenance of a certain kind of ‘status quo’ & definitely for reminding everyone who’s ‘really’ in charge around here.