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nok-ind:

YORUBA AFRICAN ORISHAS: These are the gods & goddesses of the IFA Religion which originated in Nigeria West Africa. Due to the slave trade the religion spread to Brazil, Cuba, The Caribbean and several other areas around the globe. There are over 400 Orishas however, only 20 key deities are still readily known and worshiped. 

nok-ind:

YORUBA AFRICAN ORISHAS: These are the gods & goddesses of the IFA Religion which originated in Nigeria West Africa. Due to the slave trade the religion spread to Brazil, Cuba, The Caribbean and several other areas around the globe. There are over 400 Orishas however, only 20 key deities are still readily known and worshiped. 

(via diasporicroots)

kwekudee-tripdownthememorylane.blogspot.co.uk
fyeahblackhistory:

LADY BONETTA FORBES DAVIES:An African Princess in Victorian England. (Sarah Forbes Bonetta as “The Dahomian Captive”)Sarah Forbes Bonetta was brought to England from West Africa in 1850 where she was presented to Queen Victoria who financed her education and became godmother to her daughter Victoria, born 1863. Married to West African merchant, she died in 1880.Her daughter married a Scotland-qualified doctor, the African John Randle. Living in London in the 1900s Mrs Victoria Davies Randle provided a Nigerian theme to Samuel Coleridge-Taylor who arranged it and published it (Boston, MA: Ditson, 1905).Before Sarah Bonetta’s fame she posed for this water colour by Octavius Oakley, who was known as a painter of gypsies and personalities including Joseph Paxton. The painting went on sale in London in March 2000 priced at £7,500 when the catalogue subtitled it “the Dahoman Captive”. READ MORE ON HER WITH HISTORICAL PHOTOS HERE

fyeahblackhistory:

LADY BONETTA FORBES DAVIES:An African Princess in Victorian England. (Sarah Forbes Bonetta as “The Dahomian Captive”)

Sarah Forbes Bonetta was brought to England from West Africa in 1850 where she was presented to Queen Victoria who financed her education and became godmother to her daughter Victoria, born 1863. Married to West African merchant, she died in 1880.
Her daughter married a Scotland-qualified doctor, the African John Randle. Living in London in the 1900s Mrs Victoria Davies Randle provided a Nigerian theme to Samuel Coleridge-Taylor who arranged it and published it (Boston, MA: Ditson, 1905).
Before Sarah Bonetta’s fame she posed for this water colour by Octavius Oakley, who was known as a painter of gypsies and personalities including Joseph Paxton. The painting went on sale in London in March 2000 priced at £7,500 when the catalogue subtitled it “the Dahoman Captive”.
READ MORE ON HER WITH HISTORICAL PHOTOS HERE

(via diasporicroots)

karlnova
karlnova:

Ladies from the Nigerian Olympic team making their entrance at the opening ceremony

karlnova:

Ladies from the Nigerian Olympic team making their entrance at the opening ceremony

(via thestoutorialist)

Nigeria lead poisoning 'worst in modern history': HRW

dynamicafrica:

A lead poisoning epidemic in Nigeria’s north that has killed 400 children and affected thousands is the worst in modern history, but cleanup has not even begun in many areas, Human Rights Watch said Tuesday.

“Thousands of children in northern Nigeria need immediate medical treatment and dozens of villages remain contaminated two years into the worst lead poisoning epidemic in modern history,” the US-based group said in a statement.

The group reiterated a previous official death toll of 400 children, with the poisoning having been caused by illegal gold mining in villages in northern Zamfara state.

“What is urgently needed is a cleanup of the affected villages and some four million dollars (three million euros) will be required for this purpose,” HRW researcher Jane Cohen told AFP.

She said foreign donors, Nigeria’s federal and the Zamfara state government must work together to tackle the problem.

“The Zamfara government is making some efforts, but this not enough. The Nigerian government and international community have to be involved,” she said. Clean-up efforts have taken place in some areas and charities such as Doctors Without Borders have been treating victims but more urgent work is needed, according to HRW.

A robust clean-up should begin before the rainy season starts in April, Cohen said.

“Environmental cleanup efforts have not even begun in numerous affected villages,” the group said.

“Research by Human Rights Watch in Zamfara in late 2011 found that children are exposed to this lead dust when they process ore in the mines, when their miner relatives return home covered with lead dust, and when the lead-filled ore is manually or mechanically crushed at home,” it said.

“Children can also be exposed to toxic lead in contaminated water and food.”

The extent of the poisoning began to come to light some two years ago.

Local communities had initially largely concealed or denied the fatalities and illnesses from lead poisoning for fear that authorities would ban their mining activities, a Doctors Without Borders official has said.

Illicit gold mining is more lucrative than agriculture for the impoverished farming communities.

afrikanistik.at
fyeahblackhistory:

Angelo Soliman (ca.1721-1796)
A  man of remarkable intelligence, intelligence that won his freedom.
He spoke six languages fluently and could write three of them fluently as well.
He was also a master swordsman, war hero,  chess specialist,  navigation expert, concert composer, and a tutor to royalty. 
He was may have been the subject of Mozart’s popular opera The Magic Flute. 
Soliman is considered one of the most learned people of his generation.
Angelo Soliman born in Africa in 1720/21 either to the Wandala or Mandara, a Muslim ethnic group in the Mandara Hills of Northern Cameroon but also in Bornu State Nigeria. His original name, Mmadi Make, is linked to a princely class in the Sokoto State in modern Nigeria. Around the age of 7 He was taken captive as a child and arrived in Marseilles as a slave, eventually transferring to the household of a marchioness in Messina who oversaw his education. Out of affection for another servant in the household, Angelina, he adopted the name Angelo and chose to celebrate September 11, his baptismal day, as his birthday. After repeated requests, he was given as a gift in 1734 to Prince Georg Christian, Fürst von Lobkowitz, the imperial governor of Sicily. He became the Prince’s valet and traveling companion, accompanying him on military campaigns throughout Europe and reportedly saving his life on one occasion, a pivotal event responsible for his social ascension. After the death of Prince Lobkowitz, Soliman was taken into the Vienna household of Joseph Wenzel I, Prince of Liechtenstein, eventually rising to chief servant. Later, he became royal tutor of the heir to the Prince, Aloys I.
A cultured man, Soliman was highly respected in the intellectual circles of Vienna and counted as a valued friend by Austrian Emperor Joseph II and Count Franz Moritz von Lacy. In 1783, he joined the Masonic lodge “True Harmony”, whose membership included many of Vienna’s influential artists and scholars of the time, among them the musicians Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Josef Haydn as well the Hungarian poet Ferenc Kazinczy. Lodge records indicate that Soliman and Mozart met on several occasions. It is likely that the character Bassa Selim in Mozart’s opera The Abduction from the Seraglio was based on Soliman. Eventually becoming the Grand Master of that lodge, Soliman helped change its ritual to include scholarly elements. This new Masonic direction rapidly influenced Freemasonic practice throughout Europe.
Remains dishonored in death
While Angelo was cultured and dressed in the latest European fashions in life, death was not so kind to him. Emperor Francis II, who came to power in 1792, had Angelo skinned upon his death in 1796 when he died of a stroke strolling the streets of Vienna.  His body was taken to an anatomical theater where he was skinned and his skeleton was removed. His internal organs were then interred. His skin was given to the sculptor Franz Thaller who stretched it over a wooden model and then added stuffing to fill it out. The Emperor dressed the skin in what he thought was African garb and kept him in his wonder cabinet, a curio room. Eventually, Soliman was added to a display on Africa with a little girl, some animals, and an ex-zoo keeper who was also African. The display was destroyed in 1848 when a bomb being used to quell rioters hit the building where the display was stored and the display, thankfully, burned.
A more detailed biography can be found here.

fyeahblackhistory:

Angelo Soliman (ca.1721-1796)

A  man of remarkable intelligence, intelligence that won his freedom.

  • He spoke six languages fluently and could write three of them fluently as well.
  • He was also a master swordsman, war hero,  chess specialist,  navigation expert, concert composer, and a tutor to royalty.
  • He was may have been the subject of Mozart’s popular opera The Magic Flute.
  • Soliman is considered one of the most learned people of his generation.

Angelo Soliman born in Africa in 1720/21 either to the Wandala or Mandara, a Muslim ethnic group in the Mandara Hills of Northern Cameroon but also in Bornu State Nigeria. His original name, Mmadi Make, is linked to a princely class in the Sokoto State in modern Nigeria. Around the age of 7 He was taken captive as a child and arrived in Marseilles as a slave, eventually transferring to the household of a marchioness in Messina who oversaw his education. Out of affection for another servant in the household, Angelina, he adopted the name Angelo and chose to celebrate September 11, his baptismal day, as his birthday. After repeated requests, he was given as a gift in 1734 to Prince Georg Christian, Fürst von Lobkowitz, the imperial governor of Sicily. He became the Prince’s valet and traveling companion, accompanying him on military campaigns throughout Europe and reportedly saving his life on one occasion, a pivotal event responsible for his social ascension. After the death of Prince Lobkowitz, Soliman was taken into the Vienna household of Joseph Wenzel I, Prince of Liechtenstein, eventually rising to chief servant. Later, he became royal tutor of the heir to the Prince, Aloys I.


A cultured man, Soliman was highly respected in the intellectual circles of Vienna and counted as a valued friend by Austrian Emperor Joseph II and Count Franz Moritz von Lacy. In 1783, he joined the Masonic lodge “True Harmony”, whose membership included many of Vienna’s influential artists and scholars of the time, among them the musicians Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Josef Haydn as well the Hungarian poet Ferenc Kazinczy. Lodge records indicate that Soliman and Mozart met on several occasions. It is likely that the character Bassa Selim in Mozart’s opera The Abduction from the Seraglio was based on Soliman. Eventually becoming the Grand Master of that lodge, Soliman helped change its ritual to include scholarly elements. This new Masonic direction rapidly influenced Freemasonic practice throughout Europe.

Remains dishonored in death

While Angelo was cultured and dressed in the latest European fashions in life, death was not so kind to him. Emperor Francis II, who came to power in 1792, had Angelo skinned upon his death in 1796 when he died of a stroke strolling the streets of Vienna.  His body was taken to an anatomical theater where he was skinned and his skeleton was removed. His internal organs were then interred. His skin was given to the sculptor Franz Thaller who stretched it over a wooden model and then added stuffing to fill it out. The Emperor dressed the skin in what he thought was African garb and kept him in his wonder cabinet, a curio room. Eventually, Soliman was added to a display on Africa with a little girl, some animals, and an ex-zoo keeper who was also African. The display was destroyed in 1848 when a bomb being used to quell rioters hit the building where the display was stored and the display, thankfully, burned.

A more detailed biography can be found here.

(via diasporicroots)

dynamicafrica:

Pupils take milk break at Queen’s College in Yaba, Lagos, Nigeria, a state secondary school for girls. 
(Photo by Keystone Features/Getty Images). 
June 1959

@xicacha This may be the best “This milk ain’t clean” image ever. She is looking into that cup like the contents are totally suspect.

dynamicafrica:

Pupils take milk break at Queen’s College in Yaba, Lagos, Nigeria, a state secondary school for girls.

(Photo by Keystone Features/Getty Images).

June 1959

@xicacha This may be the best “This milk ain’t clean” image ever. She is looking into that cup like the contents are totally suspect.

the-goddamazon

Legend of the Okpella People (another storytime).

thegoddamazon:

My mother’s people have a story that we tell as to why the Okpella Kingdom was never taken by slave traders. I’ll condense it.

Our symbol is the python, and has been since the Transatlantic Slave Trade for the following reason. The python is the “Mother of Okpella”, and you often find them twined in the cocoa trees during the rainy season (we have tons of cocoa, I’m still trying to convince my mom to tell the family to start a chocolate business and bring money into the tribe and stuff…I digress).

During the time slavery was still a heavy trade, and at this time Europeans were just foregoing negotiating for slaves and actively taking our folks, the neighboring tribe/nation sold us out. Okpella is nestled in a very lush valley, and it’s notoriously hard to get to (we have roads in some places, now, but my mother’s compound has to be reached by foot, as does the Old Palace). So after being sold out, someone gave warning, and the Okpella people packed up and vacated to the mountain caves, which are hidden by waterfalls.

When the Europeans got to the village, they found it deserted, and ventured into the mountains to search for them, suspecting a ploy. Of course, having not been accustomed to the wildlife of Africa, when they saw the pythons coiled in the trees by the caves, they abandoned their search, citing all kinds of wild tales. Of course, there’s probably more to this story, but the fact is, our people forever respect the python for this protection.

As for the snitches next door? We eventually reconciled around 1990 or so, and the royal family on our side (Afegbua…my mother’s family) exchanged our royal dance with the royal family from their side. I don’t know what that dance was, but the one we exchanged it for is called Ishimuvu, which is Okpella for “Dance of the Big Behind”. Or it is called Ishimavunuku which means “Dance of the Big Skirt” because the ladies wear these huge skirts with bells on them (for my Native friends, it’s similar to a jingle dress), and they carry a mirror and a fan. I love this dance, actually. The children of the village (myself included), just call it by the sound the drums make…which I can’t even write.

So that’s another story I picked up from my childhood. I love this story because it kind of justifies my adoration of serpents…and my choosing Slytherin as my house. :P

fuckyeahafricanmythology
fuckyeahafricanmythology:

Ani (Also known as Ala, Ana, Ale and Ale) 
Is the one of the Alusi deities of the Igbo people religion Odinani. She is the goddess of the earth, morality, death and fertility. She is the most importand of all the Alusi as she rules over the underworld that hold the deceased ancestors in her womb. Ani is usually depicted with a small child in her arms and a crescent moon. She was the first of the Alusi to be created by Chukwu, God Almighty she is married to Amadioha, the god of the sky and lightning.

As Goddess of morality, Ani is involved in judging human actions and goverens over Igbo law and customs known as Omenala. Ala’s messenger and living agent on Earth is a python, and is very revered in many Igbo communities. In Odinani art, Ala’s image is mostly depicted in clay Mbari temples. Ani is annual paid homage to during the Yam festival

fuckyeahafricanmythology:

Ani (Also known as Ala, Ana, Ale and Ale) 

Is the one of the Alusi deities of the Igbo people religion Odinani. She is the goddess of the earth, morality, death and fertility. She is the most importand of all the Alusi as she rules over the underworld that hold the deceased ancestors in her womb. Ani is usually depicted with a small child in her arms and a crescent moon. She was the first of the Alusi to be created by Chukwu, God Almighty she is married to Amadioha, the god of the sky and lightning.

As Goddess of morality, Ani is involved in judging human actions and goverens over Igbo law and customs known as Omenala. Ala’s messenger and living agent on Earth is a python, and is very revered in many Igbo communities. In Odinani art, Ala’s image is mostly depicted in clay Mbari temples. Ani is annual paid homage to during the Yam festival

N80bn leaves Nigeria yearly for UK universities – Mimiko

fyeahafrica:

ONDO State Governor, Dr. Olusegun Mimiko has decried the incredible volume of resources that gets out of the country daily, disclosing that N80 billion leaves Nigeria yearly for the United Kingdom (UK) Universities and another one billion naira is being spent financing rice import on a daily basis.

Mimiko who gave a keynote address during the Academy for Entrepreneurial Studies (AES) Excellence Club dinner disclosed further that N240 billion is spent yearly to import sugar, expressing disbelieve that such could happen in a country where 60 per cent of its cultivatable land is still lying fallow.

“We must pay attention to education, in UK, from records, we have about 68,300 Nigeria students, by computation what they pay for flight tickets for up keep and tuition are about 50,000 euro minimum, this goes to mean that every year, N80 billion leaves Nigeria to UK university.”

“If we must retain some aggregate of capital that is to create the jobs that will take our graduates off the street, we must do something about education, am not saying it is bad for people to get educated at all cost,” he said.

Ondo state Governor recalled a discussion with the Minister in charge of education and welfare in the Nigeria high commission in UK saying there are 71,000 Nigerian students in Ghana, a figure he termed scary to be acceptable.

(continue reading)

fyeahafrica:

Mrs. Wood in her immense restaurant, the 5 floors, 1500 seats Golden Gates of Lagos.
The senator, Anthony Mogbongubola Soetan (on the left of the Champagne bottle) has come here to celebrate his 70th birthday in the company of about 300 guests, all members of the Nigerian elite.
Nigeria, Lagos, 2007
Ph: Paolo Woods

fyeahafrica:

Mrs. Wood in her immense restaurant, the 5 floors, 1500 seats Golden Gates of Lagos.

The senator, Anthony Mogbongubola Soetan (on the left of the Champagne bottle) has come here to celebrate his 70th birthday in the company of about 300 guests, all members of the Nigerian elite.

Nigeria, Lagos, 2007

Ph: Paolo Woods