Esoterica's avatar

Esoterica

gradientlair
gradientlair:

I started reading Michelle Obama’s book American Grown this morning. I wanted something somewhat “lighter” to read since what I usually read is not…well…”light.” Even the fiction I choose isn’t.
Anyway, as I turned the pages I thought to myself, okay, wow. Here is this beautiful and brilliant Black woman, growing crops by choice, in the lawn of the White House. Gardening by choice. Not for someone’s profit. Not as an owned object of someone else. In a house that she honestly was never meant to be in, if many in history, or even in 2008 and 2012 had their way. Just because she wants to eat healthy and encourage it for others. She doesn’t have to worry about her garden and land being burned down and people reneging on her deed that she doesn’t hold. She doesn’t have to sell the crops to survive.
Now certainly, her story is exceptional. Many Black women live in food desserts today in 2012. Fresh produce is a luxury for many. Thus, I do not pretend her story is all of our stories. Her story still matters to me, so much. It has impacted our culture more than we even know at the moment. So while (as usual) some White feminists will argue about her gardening because it’s not powerful enough, or business enough or political enough, this is actually incredibly political. It’s very powerful. Though it should be quite obvious, I find myself often having to reiterate how our freedom to do things and how we define our womanhood is entangled, but has differing histories for Black and White women.
Eh. Alice already let me know what’s up. So garden away Michelle. I’m good with it.
Oh, by the way…so far it is really good reading! The photographs (I’m a photographer, so I pay attention to this) are really great. My father has a garden himself; he started it with my mom before she passed away 11 years ago. I am lucky that I get to grab some of the fresh goodies from his garden. Lemongrass. Spinach. Broccoli. Tomatoes. Scotch bonnet peppers. Callaloo. Ackee. Pineapple. Peas. Sweet potato. Sorrel. Cabbage.
Being able to have access to fresh foods is so important.
One thing I do want to note is that as she and others focus on obesity in children, it has to involve environmental justice and food justice. It cannot solely be “they play X-Box too much” because that is not the whole story. For adults, I DO want the culture of “X weight = lazy, bad person” to end. This is inherently biased against Black women who deal with so much already. Look how healthy Michelle appears to be and her arms are objectified while her hips are insulted….hips that many Black women have, and yet are the beacons of health. We have to focus on unhealthiness as class-related and racialized and gendered, and deconstruct those myths and lies, but still focus on changes we can make in our own lives. It’s not an either/or thing. It’s both.

gradientlair:

I started reading Michelle Obama’s book American Grown this morning. I wanted something somewhat “lighter” to read since what I usually read is not…well…”light.” Even the fiction I choose isn’t.

Anyway, as I turned the pages I thought to myself, okay, wow. Here is this beautiful and brilliant Black woman, growing crops by choice, in the lawn of the White House. Gardening by choice. Not for someone’s profit. Not as an owned object of someone else. In a house that she honestly was never meant to be in, if many in history, or even in 2008 and 2012 had their way. Just because she wants to eat healthy and encourage it for others. She doesn’t have to worry about her garden and land being burned down and people reneging on her deed that she doesn’t hold. She doesn’t have to sell the crops to survive.

Now certainly, her story is exceptional. Many Black women live in food desserts today in 2012. Fresh produce is a luxury for many. Thus, I do not pretend her story is all of our stories. Her story still matters to me, so much. It has impacted our culture more than we even know at the moment. So while (as usual) some White feminists will argue about her gardening because it’s not powerful enough, or business enough or political enough, this is actually incredibly political. It’s very powerful. Though it should be quite obvious, I find myself often having to reiterate how our freedom to do things and how we define our womanhood is entangled, but has differing histories for Black and White women.

Eh. Alice already let me know what’s up. So garden away Michelle. I’m good with it.

Oh, by the way…so far it is really good reading! The photographs (I’m a photographer, so I pay attention to this) are really great. My father has a garden himself; he started it with my mom before she passed away 11 years ago. I am lucky that I get to grab some of the fresh goodies from his garden. Lemongrass. Spinach. Broccoli. Tomatoes. Scotch bonnet peppers. Callaloo. Ackee. Pineapple. Peas. Sweet potato. Sorrel. Cabbage.

Being able to have access to fresh foods is so important.

One thing I do want to note is that as she and others focus on obesity in children, it has to involve environmental justice and food justice. It cannot solely be “they play X-Box too much” because that is not the whole story. For adults, I DO want the culture of “X weight = lazy, bad person” to end. This is inherently biased against Black women who deal with so much already. Look how healthy Michelle appears to be and her arms are objectified while her hips are insulted….hips that many Black women have, and yet are the beacons of health. We have to focus on unhealthiness as class-related and racialized and gendered, and deconstruct those myths and lies, but still focus on changes we can make in our own lives. It’s not an either/or thing. It’s both.

(via witchsistah)

Napturalgirl

napturalgirl:

Fashion in Africa.

(via strugglingtobeheard)

thisiscolossal.com

gracy:

Using fake fingernails, nail polish, barrettes, false eyelashes, jewelry and Swarovski crystals, Laurel Roth assembles these amazing peacocks.

(via ktempest)

tergiverso
tergiverso:

Ah Weh Eyu (Pretty Flower) Seneca 1908

tergiverso:

Ah Weh Eyu (Pretty Flower) Seneca 1908

(via youlikemealready)

Black Paddy, 1885 by Black History Album on Flickr.

Black Paddy, 1885 by Black History Album on Flickr.

National Geographic
nationalgeographicmagazine:

Boy With Balloons, India Photograph by Kamala Kannan, My ShotBy photographing the shadow of the child running with balloons rather than the actual child, the photographer captured an image that immediately stops us in our tracks. Though the shadow is flat, it has so much movement and life. What is most surprising is how vibrant the colors are, and this is because the background is white/off-white.
Download Wallpaper (1600 x 1200 pixels)

nationalgeographicmagazine:

Boy With Balloons, India
Photograph by Kamala Kannan, My Shot
By photographing the shadow of the child running with balloons rather than the actual child, the photographer captured an image that immediately stops us in our tracks. Though the shadow is flat, it has so much movement and life. What is most surprising is how vibrant the colors are, and this is because the background is white/off-white.

Download Wallpaper (1600 x 1200 pixels)

(via oh-whiskers)

tergiverso
tergiverso:

Ah Weh Eyu (Pretty Flower) Seneca 1908

tergiverso:

Ah Weh Eyu (Pretty Flower) Seneca 1908

The Denver Post
denverpost:

Captured: America in Color from 1939-1943
These images, by photographers of the Farm Security  Administration/Office of War Information, are some of the only color  photographs taken of the effects of the Depression on America’s rural  and small town populations. The photographs and captions are the  property of the Library of Congress and were included in a 2006 exhibit  Bound for Glory: America in Color.
View the complete gallery of 70 striking historic photos
This blog entry is from last year, but it’s enjoying a resurgence we thought we would share.

denverpost:

Captured: America in Color from 1939-1943

These images, by photographers of the Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information, are some of the only color photographs taken of the effects of the Depression on America’s rural and small town populations. The photographs and captions are the property of the Library of Congress and were included in a 2006 exhibit Bound for Glory: America in Color.

View the complete gallery of 70 striking historic photos

This blog entry is from last year, but it’s enjoying a resurgence we thought we would share.

(via creolesoul)

Flickr / beboflickr
kilele:

Nungwi Beach in Zanzibar
Photo by Beboflickr

kilele:

Nungwi Beach in Zanzibar

Photo by Beboflickr

(via so-treu)

jamesnord
jamesnord:

gotham, i’ll never leave you. 

jamesnord:

gotham, i’ll never leave you.