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Esoterica

accras
big-wired:

eshusplayground:

southernbellechelle:

gradientlair:

accras:

Congrats baby girl! Quvenzhane Wallis, age 9 is the youngest actress in history to be nominated for Best Actress.

This is wonderful. I can’t wait to see the film. I’m proud of her. From the clips I’ve seen and the articles I’ve read, I’ve heard so many good things about her powerful performance.

Gorgeous! Talented young actress.

“A Little ‘Beast’”? What the shit? That’s right up there with Barbara Walters calling Monique’s kids “creatures.” If I didn’t know the context of that tagline, I woulda side-eyed this shit for life.
Come to think of it, I still might.

So… no one thought it  in bad taste, offensive, stupid, or all three in calling a 9 year old black girl ‘a little beast’? Especially after hundreds of years of referring to black people animals in an effort to dehuamnize them?
Anyone? Anyone?
Bueller?
Bueller?
No?
*sigh*

big-wired:

eshusplayground:

southernbellechelle:

gradientlair:

accras:

Congrats baby girl! Quvenzhane Wallis, age 9 is the youngest actress in history to be nominated for Best Actress.

This is wonderful. I can’t wait to see the film. I’m proud of her. From the clips I’ve seen and the articles I’ve read, I’ve heard so many good things about her powerful performance.

Gorgeous! Talented young actress.

“A Little ‘Beast’”? What the shit? That’s right up there with Barbara Walters calling Monique’s kids “creatures.” If I didn’t know the context of that tagline, I woulda side-eyed this shit for life.

Come to think of it, I still might.

So… no one thought it  in bad taste, offensive, stupid, or all three in calling a 9 year old black girl ‘a little beast’? Especially after hundreds of years of referring to black people animals in an effort to dehuamnize them?

Anyone? Anyone?

Bueller?

Bueller?

No?

*sigh*

(via witchsistah)

all-about-male-privilege

moniquill:

thisiswealthyprivilege:

This Is Wealthy Privilege: samanthahughes11: This Is Wealthy Privilege: if you’re a racist, don’t…

exaktscience:

thisiswealthyprivilege:

exaktscience:

thisiswealthyprivilege:

samanthahughes11:

samanthahughes11:

This Is Wealthy Privilege: if you’re a racist, don’t eat chocolate

aboutmaleprivilege:

Mexicans discovered it, before the word “Mexico” existed, between 1000-400 bc. Also, don’t drink tea or coffee. And don’t eat potatoes. Or put pepper, or, you know, any…

I’m well aware that white people didn’t come from the US, and I feel a bit dense because I don’t know how that ties into my comment on this thread. On potatoes- I must be remembering an article I read on where various vegetables come from wrong, sorry about that.

How it ties into your comment is that whether or not potatoes came from the US—white people who are racist really shouldn’t use them. Because the US is part of the American continent. White people came from the other end of the earth on boats. White people are not true “Americans” in that ancestral sense, while Mexicans and Nicaraguans and the Hopi and Cherokee and Wampanoag all are, although “America” is also not the ancestral name of the continent.

When white people received potatoes, there were instances of British chefs cooking the leaves and throwing away the tubers.

Bear in mind that potatoes are nightshades. The flowers, leaves, stems, and fruits of the plants are all highly toxic, and can cause serious nerve damage and death when consumed. Great job, white people!

how are we all still alive

Maybe by having ancestors who were too poor to afford potatoes before white people figured out how they work.

I don’t think we figured it out. I’m pretty sure people had to show us how to do it. “Cut the potato into piece—DO NOT STAB YOUR FAMILY MEMBERS—STOP DOING THAT—okay well we’ll just skip that and put it into the boiling water—”

It’s funny how we think the United States is really ours. No. We sneaked onto it and burned a lot of villages instead of openly fighting and spread diseases.

Can we also talk about how white people took corn back to Europe but didn’t take back Nixtamalization and ended up with widespread pellagra as a result?

vintageblack2
vintageblack2:

THE SCOTTSBORO BOYS In the 1930s, two white prostitutes falsely accused nine black men of gang-rape, in order to avoid facing other police charges. Click the link to read more about the Scottsboro trials.

vintageblack2:

THE SCOTTSBORO BOYS In the 1930s, two white prostitutes falsely accused nine black men of gang-rape, in order to avoid facing other police charges. Click the link to read more about the Scottsboro trials.


(via snarkbender)

In South Africa, jealous white women decided that freed women, by their dress and manner, had become “unseemly and vexing to the public” and in 1765 they were forbidden to wear “colored silk clothing, hoopskirts, fine laces, adorned bonnets, curled hair or earrings.” One can understand the vexation over silks, but forbidding a mulatto to walk in public with her hair in curls a hundred fifty years before the invention of the straightening iron was an early and ominous indication of the white South African talent for fine-tuned racial sadism.

orlando patterson, “slavery and social death” (via ourcatastrophe)

(via educationforliberation)

gradientlair

7 Things To STOP Saying To Black Women About Beauty

gradientlair:

1) Stop calling our natural hair ugly.

2) Stop approaching our natural hair with a hierarchy than reinforces colourism.

3) Stop using placement in the natural hair community to bully Black women who may still have relaxed hair or weaves.

4) Stop saying “she’s pretty…for a dark-skinned woman.”

5) Stop saying “she’s pretty…for a big/fat woman.”

6) Stop implying that any biracial women who identify as Black or any light skinned Black women are the only ones that are attractive, and stop acting like any Black woman who deviates from this appearance should be “lucky” to have a man, regardless of how utterly lousy that man might be. Love is not something to be rationed out like a commodity only for those who are closest to appearing White.

7) Stop saying “you’re too pretty to be single.” Attraction to someone has NOTHING to do with THEIR choice to pursue a relationship or not. This is inherently patriarchal and in fact not even a logical thing to say.

Who should stop this? ANYONE who does it (that’s you White and people of colour), INCLUDING other Black men and Black women. Reject White supremacist, Eurocentric and patriarchal thoughts about beauty.

(via witchsistah)

darkjez

Remember that time when some bitches who ain’t know me decided that I’m white-passing & “look Italian on a regular basis”

darkjez:

I tried to pick my (white) nephew up from daycare the other day &, despite the fact that I’m listed in his file as one of the people allowed to pick him up, the lil becky that was watching him that afternoon refused to release him to me. She called his mom (my sister) & I overheard her saying that “some black chick showed up to get him & I wasn’t sure…”

remind me again why I’m the only black person that’s somehow not allowed to use the n-word

(via deliciouskaek)

alexandraerin:

artist-confessions:

That’s right. I don’t want to draw people of colour. Why? I don’t find them aesthetically pleasing. And no, that doesn’t make me racist. I have nothing against people of colour. I don’t have a problem with them. Some of my best friends are people of colour, and I don’t think any less of them for that.
I just don’t find poc attractive. Kinda like I don’t find big noses or buck teeth attractive. Or curly hair, or bushy eyebrows, or super thin lips, or certain face shapes. Or a lot of Freckles. Or really huge butts. Or ginormous boobs.
I like to draw things that I find attractive or interesting, so that’s what I’ll draw. If it doesn’t fit into what I think is attractive or interesting, I tend not to draw it.
And I don’t have to. So all you “BAH YOU DON’T DRAW POC! YOU RACIST!” people need to stfu. People can draw whatever the fuck they want, and you can’t force them to draw something they don’t want to. They might be racist, they might not. But it doesn’t matter. We all have free will.
submitted by -belle-of-ponderosa

Try saying this out loud:
“I’m not racist, I just don’t find people of other races very attractive or interesting.”
Do you see the problem there?
Imagine someone you think of as definitely, inarguably racist. Think of something they would say about people of color. Now imagine them saying, “I’m not racist, I just think [this thing].”
You see how that doesn’t work?
Yes, everyone has free will, but I don’t see what you think that has to do with it. During the days of open segregation, people of their own free will decided to restrict their businesses and neighborhoods to white people only. Did the fact that they chose to do this based on their preferences make it “not racist”? No. That’s… that’s pretty much what racism is, on the individual level. You, of your own free will, deciding to do this.

alexandraerin:

artist-confessions:

That’s right. I don’t want to draw people of colour. Why? I don’t find them aesthetically pleasing. And no, that doesn’t make me racist. I have nothing against people of colour. I don’t have a problem with them. Some of my best friends are people of colour, and I don’t think any less of them for that.

I just don’t find poc attractive. Kinda like I don’t find big noses or buck teeth attractive. Or curly hair, or bushy eyebrows, or super thin lips, or certain face shapes. Or a lot of Freckles. Or really huge butts. Or ginormous boobs.

I like to draw things that I find attractive or interesting, so that’s what I’ll draw. If it doesn’t fit into what I think is attractive or interesting, I tend not to draw it.

And I don’t have to. So all you “BAH YOU DON’T DRAW POC! YOU RACIST!” people need to stfu. People can draw whatever the fuck they want, and you can’t force them to draw something they don’t want to. They might be racist, they might not. But it doesn’t matter. We all have free will.

submitted by -belle-of-ponderosa

Try saying this out loud:

“I’m not racist, I just don’t find people of other races very attractive or interesting.”

Do you see the problem there?

Imagine someone you think of as definitely, inarguably racist. Think of something they would say about people of color. Now imagine them saying, “I’m not racist, I just think [this thing].”

You see how that doesn’t work?

Yes, everyone has free will, but I don’t see what you think that has to do with it. During the days of open segregation, people of their own free will decided to restrict their businesses and neighborhoods to white people only. Did the fact that they chose to do this based on their preferences make it “not racist”? No. That’s… that’s pretty much what racism is, on the individual level. You, of your own free will, deciding to do this.

(via deliciouskaek)

pushinghoopswithsticks
velocicrafter:

pushinghoopswithsticks:


“I’m tired of people asking me to smooth my name out for them. They want me to bury it in English so they can understand. I will not accommodate the word for mouth. I will not break my name so your lazy English can sleep its tongue on top. Fix your lips around them. No you can’t give me a stupid nickname so that you can replace this gift of five letters.” - Hiwot Adilow (linked above, performing the quoted piece)
“Give your daughters difficult names. Give your daughters names that command the full use of tongue. My name makes you want to tell me the truth. My name doesn’t allow me to trust anyone that cannot pronounce it right.” - Warsan Shire
pictured above: Entitled white woman Jenny Johnson in all her ethnocentricity. I grew up with women like her, they were my teachers, classmates. They resent any self-possessed “other” as “arrogant” for attempting to access the same common courtesy and respect they might allow those as vanilla as themselves. These women view it as their birthright to decide what is “weird” and “obscure” from within a niche limited to “white women named Jenny.” They blame their linguistic inadequacy on our parentage while resting on the privileges of their own. These women never amount to anything beyond an ignorant bully forever isolating themselves from incredible people with spectacular names.

our insistence that you pronounce our names correctly = “arrogance”
your insistence that our names are too difficult for you & that we should just deal w/the way you mangle them = ????? (the answer is white supremacy)

velocicrafter:

pushinghoopswithsticks:

“I’m tired of people asking me to smooth my name out for them. They want me to bury it in English so they can understand. I will not accommodate the word for mouth. I will not break my name so your lazy English can sleep its tongue on top. Fix your lips around them. No you can’t give me a stupid nickname so that you can replace this gift of five letters.” - Hiwot Adilow (linked above, performing the quoted piece)

“Give your daughters difficult names. Give your daughters names that command the full use of tongue. My name makes you want to tell me the truth. My name doesn’t allow me to trust anyone that cannot pronounce it right.” - Warsan Shire


pictured above: Entitled white woman Jenny Johnson in all her ethnocentricity. I grew up with women like her, they were my teachers, classmates. They resent any self-possessed “other” as “arrogant” for attempting to access the same common courtesy and respect they might allow those as vanilla as themselves. These women view it as their birthright to decide what is “weird” and “obscure” from within a niche limited to “white women named Jenny.” They blame their linguistic inadequacy on our parentage while resting on the privileges of their own. These women never amount to anything beyond an ignorant bully forever isolating themselves from incredible people with spectacular names.

our insistence that you pronounce our names correctly = “arrogance”

your insistence that our names are too difficult for you & that we should just deal w/the way you mangle them = ????? (the answer is white supremacy)

(via snarkbender)

pearlsandsweatpants

My White Neighbors

thewhitemankilledthetruth:

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

pearlsandsweatpants:

Last week I moved into a new house. My brother-in law helped me move. There were children (4 & 8 niece/nephew) retrieving things from my trunk. 

Cautiously, my new White neighbors pulled into their driveway. 

Stare.

They go inside.

We go inside. 

Police show up.

“Concerned neighbor” calls to alert authorities that we may be stealing copper and or any valuables (sink, tub, countertop, idk) from vacant house next door..

We show our moving boxes AND Occupancy Permit. The TWO cop cars that were sent out, say “Oh ok” and leave..

Dis shit right here

image

I’d set their backyard on fire

(via hamburgerjack)

girljanitor
cabell:

[snipped, not because it’s not a great original post—it is; will reblog separately—or because there aren’t great responses in here—there are; click through to read—but because this is probably on a lot of dashes already and also it was getting to the point of being so deeply threaded that it was becoming impossible to read]
purpletomahawk:


You know, I kinda have a problem with this, as well. I’m white, but one thing I’ve made a major point in my life is to never see skin color. If you had told me this book was part of a wonderful fantasy series that would have been fine. If you had told me the protagonists were people of color and the antagonists where white: still fine. But you had to drive home the thought that it’s so superior just for those reasons, and that’s unsettling. Racism does work both ways. Someone else expressed disinterest in the book and you jumped down her throat because she was white and expressed an opinion. She doesn’t have to like this book. That doesn’t make her any less of a bad person, nor does it make me one (although I do still plan on reading them, despite the racist review). Think before you type, because you can spew just as much ignorant bullshit as the people you are calling racist.


A few notes on the bolded, working backwards:
1) “Racism” is a complex interweaving of various institutional structures, supported and reinforced by individual attitudes and behaviors but not reducible solely to those attitudes and behaviors, that grants power and privilege to some people based on group membership (the dominant group) while denying power and privilege to other people based on group membership (marginalized groups).  In the West, White people are the dominant group.
The review is not “racist” because regardless of what it says about White people, it does not—it cannot—turn that entire hierarchy upside down.  White people are still dominant, as numerous other posters have pointed out; 99.99% of the stories that will ever cross your path will still treat White people as individuals and people of color (POC) as stereotypes, tokens, somehow less-than-humans.
2) “Color blindness” is not a worthy goal to which to aspire.  There is a reason that race scholars and activists refer to “color-blind racism”: When people say they don’t see color, what they ultimately mean is, they don’t see POC as legitimately human.  They may not understand that this is what necessarily underlies their fantasy of a world without color, but studies demonstrate that in fact, they see everyone as potentially White or White-like until those people somehow fail to live up to their standards of Whiteness, and then they see those people as deficient, wrong, and deserving of worse outcomes than “good” (White, or as White-like as possible) people.
If you do not see color, then how do you explain persistent gaps in education, income, wealth, and incarceration between White people and POC (particularly Black people)?  You blame the victims, because you have purposely erased the single most important demographic characteristic for explaining those disparities.  Without that demographic, their outcomes must be the result of personal character flaws.
But of course, since you don’t REALLY “not see color,” over time, you end up ascribing those outcomes to flaws in the group: “Black people go to prison  more than White people because they are naturally disposed toward criminality,” rather than “Black people go to prison more than White people because police look for crime in Black neighborhoods and are more likely to stop Black people and charge Black people, who are are more likely to be convicted and sentenced in mainly White courts.”  The second explanation is more complex; it is also an accurate representation of the world we live in.
POC cannot “not see color” because such a strategy would be, for them, suicidal.  For White people, “color blindness” is a comforting lie that allows us to ignore our complicity in the systems that generally reward us for our efforts and treat us generously when we fall, while ignoring the efforts of POC and destroying them if they so much as falter.
Large parts of Eduardo Bonilla-Silva’s Racism Without Racists: Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in the United States are available as a preview on Google books.  I highly recommend that you check it out.  I’ve assigned chapter 3, “The Style of Color-Blind Racism: How to Talk Nasty about Minorities without Sounding Racist” in courses on race & ethnicity mainly because it uses some concrete interview data that may make the arguments more accessible to you.
Finally, please note that I, as a White person, have the luxury of thinking about this in an academic framework and responding to you in a somewhat measured fashion, with all the cultural trappings of dominance (both race and class) in our culture.  Do not mistake that for validity.
The anger of POC in response to your posts upholding the racist status quo is valid.  They do not owe you anything and you do not have any special right not to be yelled at for hurting people.  I want you to learn so that you do not hurt people.  But if you can’t do that, I do at least suggest that you stay out of conversations that for once are not about you.

cabell:

[snipped, not because it’s not a great original post—it is; will reblog separately—or because there aren’t great responses in here—there are; click through to read—but because this is probably on a lot of dashes already and also it was getting to the point of being so deeply threaded that it was becoming impossible to read]

purpletomahawk:

You know, I kinda have a problem with this, as well. I’m white, but one thing I’ve made a major point in my life is to never see skin color. If you had told me this book was part of a wonderful fantasy series that would have been fine. If you had told me the protagonists were people of color and the antagonists where white: still fine. But you had to drive home the thought that it’s so superior just for those reasons, and that’s unsettling. Racism does work both ways. Someone else expressed disinterest in the book and you jumped down her throat because she was white and expressed an opinion. She doesn’t have to like this book. That doesn’t make her any less of a bad person, nor does it make me one (although I do still plan on reading them, despite the racist review). Think before you type, because you can spew just as much ignorant bullshit as the people you are calling racist.

A few notes on the bolded, working backwards:

1) “Racism” is a complex interweaving of various institutional structures, supported and reinforced by individual attitudes and behaviors but not reducible solely to those attitudes and behaviors, that grants power and privilege to some people based on group membership (the dominant group) while denying power and privilege to other people based on group membership (marginalized groups).  In the West, White people are the dominant group.

The review is not “racist” because regardless of what it says about White people, it does not—it cannot—turn that entire hierarchy upside down.  White people are still dominant, as numerous other posters have pointed out; 99.99% of the stories that will ever cross your path will still treat White people as individuals and people of color (POC) as stereotypes, tokens, somehow less-than-humans.

2) “Color blindness” is not a worthy goal to which to aspire.  There is a reason that race scholars and activists refer to “color-blind racism”: When people say they don’t see color, what they ultimately mean is, they don’t see POC as legitimately human.  They may not understand that this is what necessarily underlies their fantasy of a world without color, but studies demonstrate that in fact, they see everyone as potentially White or White-like until those people somehow fail to live up to their standards of Whiteness, and then they see those people as deficient, wrong, and deserving of worse outcomes than “good” (White, or as White-like as possible) people.

If you do not see color, then how do you explain persistent gaps in education, income, wealth, and incarceration between White people and POC (particularly Black people)?  You blame the victims, because you have purposely erased the single most important demographic characteristic for explaining those disparities.  Without that demographic, their outcomes must be the result of personal character flaws.

But of course, since you don’t REALLY “not see color,” over time, you end up ascribing those outcomes to flaws in the group: “Black people go to prison  more than White people because they are naturally disposed toward criminality,” rather than “Black people go to prison more than White people because police look for crime in Black neighborhoods and are more likely to stop Black people and charge Black people, who are are more likely to be convicted and sentenced in mainly White courts.”  The second explanation is more complex; it is also an accurate representation of the world we live in.

POC cannot “not see color” because such a strategy would be, for them, suicidal.  For White people, “color blindness” is a comforting lie that allows us to ignore our complicity in the systems that generally reward us for our efforts and treat us generously when we fall, while ignoring the efforts of POC and destroying them if they so much as falter.

Large parts of Eduardo Bonilla-Silva’s Racism Without Racists: Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in the United States are available as a preview on Google books.  I highly recommend that you check it out.  I’ve assigned chapter 3, “The Style of Color-Blind Racism: How to Talk Nasty about Minorities without Sounding Racist” in courses on race & ethnicity mainly because it uses some concrete interview data that may make the arguments more accessible to you.

Finally, please note that I, as a White person, have the luxury of thinking about this in an academic framework and responding to you in a somewhat measured fashion, with all the cultural trappings of dominance (both race and class) in our culture.  Do not mistake that for validity.

The anger of POC in response to your posts upholding the racist status quo is valid.  They do not owe you anything and you do not have any special right not to be yelled at for hurting people.  I want you to learn so that you do not hurt people.  But if you can’t do that, I do at least suggest that you stay out of conversations that for once are not about you.