womanistgamergirl

“My Ancestors were Slaves Too”

thegoddamazon:

racismschool:

The above statement seems to be one of the favorite sayings of the racist. Let’s take a closer look at what it really meant to be a “Slave.”

Roman Slaves:

  • Slaves were clothed and fed well, often better than poor free Romans
  • “Some” slave owners forced their female slaves into prostitution to earn more money
  • When slaves had children, they were often thought to be treated better than their parents because the Masters saw them grow up and “Had a soft spot” for them
  • “Some” slave owners turned some of their slaves into “Gladiators” and forced them to fight wild animals in an arena for the amusement of the masses
  • “Some slave masters showed their loyalty and how much they cared for their slaves by giving nearly complete charge of their money and business affairs to the slaves without interfering.” (WAIT! WHAT?)
  • Saturnalia-A traditional celebration like Christmas in which slaves and masters switched places. In this celebration, the master became the slave and performed all the tasks of the slave, and the slaves did the opposite. (WHAT IS THIS? WHAT THE FUCK IS THIS?) Let’s move on…

Greek Slaves:

  • If a slave talked back they could be whipped or arrested
  • Slaves were thought of as property, no human
  • They could not use their own names, were assigned names by their master
  • There were three ways a Greek slave could “Escape” slavery
  • The Government could free them (Huh?)
  • Their Master could free them 
  • Eranoi-A club that LENT MONEY TO SLAVES to buy their freedom. (UM? WHAT IS THIS SHIT?) 

Jewish Slaves:

  • In the early stage, it was perfectly acceptable to rape a female slave
  • If a child was conceived between a master and a female slave, the child would be accepted into the master’s home and raised as his own (I’M SORRY, WHAT?)
  • Later, sex with a slave was illegal (THE FUCK?) and if you were caught, you were publicly flogged and temporarily excommunicated 
  • The law stated that Jewish slaves were to be treated better than non-Jewish slaves. This was not always practiced but it was the law.
  • Because of this law, Jewish slaves were supposed to be granted similar food, drink, lodging and bedding as their masters (UM?)
  • During the Talmudic Era, a Jewish slave was set free after seven years of service (DONE! FUCKING DONE!)

American Black Slaves:

  • Tell me, do you really want to see the comparisons on this?

The next time some racist piece of shit tells you that their “Ancestors were slaves too” smile, tilt your head to the side and ask them if they’d like to compare.

Reblogging because too many white people I know try and use this as a “get out of racist discussion free” card.

deliciouskaek

Can i just say something?

deliciouskaek:

thisshitisallracist:

triumphandstruggle:

This will probably piss someone off but this ancestry.com commercial pisses me off. 

african american man saying how he knew his family had probably been slaves and acting like victim etc. 

It pisses me off when african americans these days make such a big deal that there great great great great great great even sometimes great grandparents were slaves(alittle dramatic) seriously i understand it was a terrible thing but honestly dont play victim when you were not a slave, not even close. yes people are still racist and there assholes but your not even CLOSE to a slave. 

You don’t see a Jew on there talking about the holocaust and how there great great grandparents were victim to that etc. no people don’t say stuff about that.

Im sorry but it pisses me off, i completely understand how terrible it was but honestly. is this wrong?

Um…yeah…yeah that’s…really wrong actually. 

Um, yeah, that’s pretty damn wrong.

And frankly, yes, I do hear Jewish people talking about the Holocaust, and how terrible it was. I do hear it. And I don’t think that’s a terrible thing, because the Holocaust was fucking horrible.

But why do you think it’s so awful for Black folks to talk about slavery? I bet I know…

[[ Slavery, btw, was also fucking horrible. ]]

What math is this dumb motherfucker doing? Two of my great grandparents were slaves. There is no 15 generation gap between the descendants of black American slaves and slavery. 1865 is not that long ago folks. And that’s before we get into Reconstruction & Jim Crow and the horrors that followed the end of legalized slavery.

hamburgerjack
hamburgerjack:

vintageblackbeauty:

Aunt Betty.  She was the slave of Mr. Walker, at Faunsdale, and was the  cook for Rev. Mr. Harrison, Rector of St. Michael’s.  The picture, taken  in Aunt Betty’s home, shows a typical cabin interior.
circa 1915

One of the comments in the notes made me realize, a few of the other captions too (not done by the blog owner), that many of these captions, the way they describe us…
She’s not your Aunt. She was your slave. And she may have been free when this picture was taken… but she was never ya’ll’s Aunt.

hamburgerjack:

vintageblackbeauty:

Aunt Betty. She was the slave of Mr. Walker, at Faunsdale, and was the cook for Rev. Mr. Harrison, Rector of St. Michael’s. The picture, taken in Aunt Betty’s home, shows a typical cabin interior.

circa 1915

One of the comments in the notes made me realize, a few of the other captions too (not done by the blog owner), that many of these captions, the way they describe us…

She’s not your Aunt. She was your slave. And she may have been free when this picture was taken… but she was never ya’ll’s Aunt.

rematiration-deactivated2013111
adailyriot:

Diana Fletcher
Diana Fletcher was born about 1838 in Indian Territory (now Oklahoma); her death date and place are unknown. Diana’s  father was born in Virginia; his parents were born in Africa and  brought to America as slaves. While still a young child he was sold to a  man who lived in Florida, ran away, and lived with the Seminole  Indians. He married a Seminole woman who died on “The Trail of Tears”  (the forced relocation of Indians to Oklahoma). Diana learned  traditional Kiowa crafts from her step-mother: sewing, cooking, tanning  buffalo hides, making teepees, and basketweaving. Some sources say Diana  taught fellow Native Americans. When the members of the tribe  raised enough money, they built a small school and hired a teacher. The  Black Indian schools were operated by what are known as ‘The Five  Civilized Tribes’: the Creek, Chicasaw, Cherokee, Choctaw, and Seminole.  Diana valued and preserved her family’s history, culture and  values, while, at the same time, learning to adjust and adapt to white  American society. Because of ignorance, prejudice and racial  hostility, the U.S. government attempted to force Black Indians, as well  as all Native Americans, to reject their heritage. Because people  like Diana maintained their traditions, we can now learn about their  important contributions to the history of America.Some sources say  Diana attended the Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute in Virginia  (later called the Hampton Institute), although listings of students do  not reflect this. The Hampton government boarding school was opened for  Black students in 1868, with the intent of educating by training “the  head, the hand, and the heart” so pupils could return to their  communities as leaders and professionals among their people. In  1878, the institute opened its doors to Indians. The following year, in a  grand experiment led by Capt. Richard Henry Pratt, the Carlisle Indian  Industrial School in Carlisle, Pennsylvannia, was opened as a way to  assimilate Indians into “civilized” society, although without the intent  of returning graduates to their communities. Kiowa Indians, as well as thousands of Native Americans from many other tribes, attended these schools.

adailyriot:

Diana Fletcher

Diana Fletcher was born about 1838 in Indian Territory (now Oklahoma); her death date and place are unknown.
Diana’s father was born in Virginia; his parents were born in Africa and brought to America as slaves. While still a young child he was sold to a man who lived in Florida, ran away, and lived with the Seminole Indians. He married a Seminole woman who died on “The Trail of Tears” (the forced relocation of Indians to Oklahoma).
Diana learned traditional Kiowa crafts from her step-mother: sewing, cooking, tanning buffalo hides, making teepees, and basketweaving. Some sources say Diana taught fellow Native Americans.
When the members of the tribe raised enough money, they built a small school and hired a teacher. The Black Indian schools were operated by what are known as ‘The Five Civilized Tribes’: the Creek, Chicasaw, Cherokee, Choctaw, and Seminole.
Diana valued and preserved her family’s history, culture and values, while, at the same time, learning to adjust and adapt to white American society.
Because of ignorance, prejudice and racial hostility, the U.S. government attempted to force Black Indians, as well as all Native Americans, to reject their heritage.
Because people like Diana maintained their traditions, we can now learn about their important contributions to the history of America.
Some sources say Diana attended the Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute in Virginia (later called the Hampton Institute), although listings of students do not reflect this. The Hampton government boarding school was opened for Black students in 1868, with the intent of educating by training “the head, the hand, and the heart” so pupils could return to their communities as leaders and professionals among their people.
In 1878, the institute opened its doors to Indians. The following year, in a grand experiment led by Capt. Richard Henry Pratt, the Carlisle Indian Industrial School in Carlisle, Pennsylvannia, was opened as a way to assimilate Indians into “civilized” society, although without the intent of returning graduates to their communities.
Kiowa Indians, as well as thousands of Native Americans from many other tribes, attended these schools.