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Peru defies UN breakthrough on uncontacted tribes© Survival International
Peru’s government is ignoring new UN guidelines on the protection of uncontacted Indians in the Amazon.
Instead of backing the UN’s landmark report, which supports the tribes’ right to be left alone, Peru is allowing the country’s largest gas project to expand further into indigenous territories known to house numerous uncontacted Indians.
The new UN guidance makes clear that uncontacted tribes’ land should be untouchable, and that ‘no rights should be granted that involve the use of natural resources’.
The expansion plan adds to existing controversies around Argentine gas giant Pluspetrol and its notorious Camisea project in southeast Peru.
Past oil and gas exploration in Peru has resulted in violent and disastrous contact with isolated Indians.
In the early 1980s, Shell workers opened up paths into the uncontacted Nahua Indians’ land. Diseases soon wiped out half the tribe.
One surviving Nahua who lives close to Camisea’s developments said, ‘The company should not be here. All the time we hear helicopters. Our animals have left, there are no fish. For this, I don’t want the company. No! No company.’
Despite an electoral campaign that promised to respect indigenous rights, Peru’s President Ollanta Humala has done little to guarantee the survival of indigenous peoples.
The Camisea consortium includes US-based Hunt Oil and Spain’s Repsol. Both have been accused of violating tribal peoples’ rights.
Survival’s Director Stephen Corry said today, ‘The UN’s breakthrough report at last recognises the rights of uncontacted Indians. Peru needs to read it and respect those who wish to be left alone before entire tribes are lost forever.’

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Peru defies UN breakthrough on uncontacted tribes
© Survival International

Peru’s government is ignoring new UN guidelines on the protection of uncontacted Indians in the Amazon.

Instead of backing the UN’s landmark report, which supports the tribes’ right to be left alone, Peru is allowing the country’s largest gas project to expand further into indigenous territories known to house numerous uncontacted Indians.

The new UN guidance makes clear that uncontacted tribes’ land should be untouchable, and that ‘no rights should be granted that involve the use of natural resources’.

The expansion plan adds to existing controversies around Argentine gas giant Pluspetrol and its notorious Camisea project in southeast Peru.

Past oil and gas exploration in Peru has resulted in violent and disastrous contact with isolated Indians.

In the early 1980s, Shell workers opened up paths into the uncontacted Nahua Indians’ land. Diseases soon wiped out half the tribe.

One surviving Nahua who lives close to Camisea’s developments said, ‘The company should not be here. All the time we hear helicopters. Our animals have left, there are no fish. For this, I don’t want the company. No! No company.’

Despite an electoral campaign that promised to respect indigenous rights, Peru’s President Ollanta Humala has done little to guarantee the survival of indigenous peoples.

The Camisea consortium includes US-based Hunt Oil and Spain’s Repsol. Both have been accused of violating tribal peoples’ rights.

Survival’s Director Stephen Corry said today, ‘The UN’s breakthrough report at last recognises the rights of uncontacted Indians. Peru needs to read it and respect those who wish to be left alone before entire tribes are lost forever.’

(via ihavethisblog)

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I just downloaded this book from this page.
Some things that are mentioned in the book;
‘Minority and indigenous women are in particularly vulnerable positions because they often come from poor socio-economic backgrounds and live in remote areas. They have little access to justice and in many cases face discrimination from the police and the judicial system because of their minority status and because of their gender.’
100% of all Batwa women, an indigenous people in Uganda have experienced physical violence and in many cases these abuses are still going on.
When indigenous women report rape, their reports are treated as less serious than they would have been treated, had the women not been indigenous.
‘Much has been achieved over the last decade to highlight the scourge of violence against women around the world. But development agencies, governments and human rights activists need to realise that not all women face the same obstacles, and that violence against women often has a particular ethnic or religious dimension’

selchieproductions:

I just downloaded this book from this page.

Some things that are mentioned in the book;

  • ‘Minority and indigenous women are in particularly vulnerable positions because they often come from poor socio-economic backgrounds and live in remote areas. They have little access to justice and in many cases face discrimination from the police and the judicial system because of their minority status and because of their gender.’

  • 100% of all Batwa women, an indigenous people in Uganda have experienced physical violence and in many cases these abuses are still going on.

  • When indigenous women report rape, their reports are treated as less serious than they would have been treated, had the women not been indigenous.
  • ‘Much has been achieved over the last decade to highlight the scourge of violence against women around the world. But development agencies, governments and human rights activists need to realise that not all women face the same obstacles, and that violence against women often has a particular ethnic or religious dimension’

(via yakuntiklaylie)

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© Survival International
Paraguay to hand over indigenous land
The Paraguayan government has this week signed an agreement with Enxet Indians to hand back 1,000 hectares of their ancestral land.
The decision comes after a long legal battle between the indigenous people and state before the Inter-American Court of Human Rights (IACHR).
The Enxet community of Kelyenmagategma in northern Paraguay has been fighting for its land for over a decade and has been subjected to a barrage of forced evictions, intimidation and violent threats.
After the case was brought before the IACHR the Enxet received 8,748 hectares of their ancestral land in August this year.
Under this week’s agreement the government should provide the community with new homes, health posts, schools and up to $500,000 for community projects.
Enxet leader Celso Benítez Zavala has welcomed the decision but warned he would remain vigilant to ensure the government keeps its promises, after ‘years of the state’s profound disinterest’.

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© Survival International

Paraguay to hand over indigenous land

The Paraguayan government has this week signed an agreement with Enxet Indians to hand back 1,000 hectares of their ancestral land.

The decision comes after a long legal battle between the indigenous people and state before the Inter-American Court of Human Rights (IACHR).

The Enxet community of Kelyenmagategma in northern Paraguay has been fighting for its land for over a decade and has been subjected to a barrage of forced evictions, intimidation and violent threats.

After the case was brought before the IACHR the Enxet received 8,748 hectares of their ancestral land in August this year.

Under this week’s agreement the government should provide the community with new homes, health posts, schools and up to $500,000 for community projects.

Enxet leader Celso Benítez Zavala has welcomed the decision but warned he would remain vigilant to ensure the government keeps its promises, after ‘years of the state’s profound disinterest’.

(via dammitcaleb-deactivated20130328)